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Thread: BFR-How hard?

  1. #1

    Default BFR-How hard?

    On Thursday at Merrill. How serious is this one hour ground? I lost my wizz wheel years ago along with my plotter when I bought a GPS.

  2. #2

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    I think if you study up on Parts 61, and 91 you would be fine. VFR weather and fuel minimums, recency requirements, airspace and associated equipment requirements, and also airport signage...the FAA really has a thing for runway incursions.

    Those are just off the top of my head...standard stuff really.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by ajbart76 View Post
    I think if you study up on Parts 61, and 91 you would be fine. VFR weather and fuel minimums, recency requirements, airspace and associated equipment requirements, and also airport signage...the FAA really has a thing for runway incursions.

    Those are just off the top of my head...standard stuff really.
    Thanks for the reminder on the FAA runway incursions. I had forgotten about that. I used to get a brochure or a dvd once a week on that subject in the mail. On flight planning why is the FAA so against GPS for VFR? How many of you still use VOR or ADF?

  4. #4
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    A BFR is not a test, it's a review. Take the opportunity to improve your skills. It should be more of an advanced lesson than an examination.

  5. #5

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    Just seems like the FAA is behind the times doesn't it!?!

    ADF? Really? I've been flying since 2002...a short time compared to some people, but somehow I've managed to go this whole time without having to demonstrate an ADF approach, either in my initial training (airplane or helicopter), checkrides with an FAA examiner, or in any subsequent part 135 checkride. Could I do it? YES. Would it be pretty? Probably not! For VFR flying, given only an ADF and a sectional, I would depend on the sectional chart first, and the ADF for verification/double check. There's a reason the ADF's are being decomissioned at a rapid pace.

    VOR? Still a viable navigation tool, but for VFR flight, really just a way to confirm where you think you are on the chart...a little easier with DME. Even the most basic GPS unit will give you the same information, with greater accuracy and dependability...no limitation on distance from the station and altitude when the clouds are low through the passes!

    Modern moving map GPS "handheld" units are relatively cheap, and a terrific aid to situational awareness. Mount them in a "heads up" area of the cockpit, with a good view of the sky for the antenna, and you have yourself a wealth of information at your fingertips! A WAC, Sectional, and an AFD all rolled into one. Not to mention instant calculations of ETE, ETA, Groundspeed and even wind direction and velocity given a reliable compass and ASI. Very easy to calculate wether or not you will make it to your destination with a fuel reserve, and if something goes wrong, the "Nearest" function is invaluable!

    I think a flight instructor or examiner should allow any tools available to complete a flight safely and efficiently, as long as the pilot has a good working knowledge of the equipment. Of course you'll always have the latest chart available for the inevitable GPS failure during the BFR or checkride.

    But I'm probably preaching to the choir, aren't I?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by ajbart76 View Post
    Just seems like the FAA is behind the times doesn't it!?!

    ADF? Really? I've been flying since 2002...a short time compared to some people, but somehow I've managed to go this whole time without having to demonstrate an ADF approach, either in my initial training (airplane or helicopter), checkrides with an FAA examiner, or in any subsequent part 135 checkride. Could I do it? YES. Would it be pretty? Probably not! For VFR flying, given only an ADF and a sectional, I would depend on the sectional chart first, and the ADF for verification/double check. There's a reason the ADF's are being decomissioned at a rapid pace.

    VOR? Still a viable navigation tool, but for VFR flight, really just a way to confirm where you think you are on the chart...a little easier with DME. Even the most basic GPS unit will give you the same information, with greater accuracy and dependability...no limitation on distance from the station and altitude when the clouds are low through the passes!

    Modern moving map GPS "handheld" units are relatively cheap, and a terrific aid to situational awareness. Mount them in a "heads up" area of the cockpit, with a good view of the sky for the antenna, and you have yourself a wealth of information at your fingertips! A WAC, Sectional, and an AFD all rolled into one. Not to mention instant calculations of ETE, ETA, Groundspeed and even wind direction and velocity given a reliable compass and ASI. Very easy to calculate wether or not you will make it to your destination with a fuel reserve, and if something goes wrong, the "Nearest" function is invaluable!

    I think a flight instructor or examiner should allow any tools available to complete a flight safely and efficiently, as long as the pilot has a good working knowledge of the equipment. Of course you'll always have the latest chart available for the inevitable GPS failure during the BFR or checkride.

    But I'm probably preaching to the choir, aren't I?
    Good post. The 296 is amazing. If I ever get in trouble with it,it will be because I get such a charge out of flying next to a wall, and seeng the screen on that side go red, I may forget I still need to fly the plane!

  7. #7
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    When I do BFRs, I try to help remind the clients what they may have forgotten and maybe slide in a few new things for them to think about. I always try to make them infomative and fun. My job is to help promote safe general aviation, not complicate it.

    dragonfly@alaska.net
    907-226-2899
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  8. #8
    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    Default BFR

    When I give a BFR I like to do the review of 61 and 91 Then point the rest of the grn work towards real world safe flying and as above try to introduce some new food for thought.
    As far as GPS etc. I'm more concerned that a pilot know how to read a map and can follow it . I find when a pilot has a pice of equipment like a GPS they know how to use it so I just make sure they can still fly if it quits on them. The whole point of a BFR is to tune up a pilot that has already had a checkride and proven he is capible of performing the operation allowed by his lic. Go forth and learn (have fun also) Tom

  9. #9

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    OK BFR done. Piece of cake except for my walking into the wing and cutting my nose open. See you at Valdez. 172 hawk,N172W.

  10. #10
    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim in anchorage View Post
    OK BFR done. Piece of cake except for my walking into the wing and cutting my nose open. See you at Valdez. 172 hawk,N172W.
    I'd be rolling on the floor laughing, except I walked into thw wing tonight too . . . bloody nose, and I couldn't see straight for a few minutes, but no cut. . . .

    SH

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sierra Hotel View Post
    I'd be rolling on the floor laughing, except I walked into thw wing tonight too . . . bloody nose, and I couldn't see straight for a few minutes, but no cut. . . .

    SH
    Well of couse I walked into the ailerons rather then the leading edge. Quite embarrassing on a BFR. Uh do you have a band aid? Oh well a new story to add to the list

  12. #12
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default glad for you

    Quote Originally Posted by jim in anchorage View Post
    Well of couse I walked into the ailerons rather then the leading edge. Quite embarrassing on a BFR. Uh do you have a band aid? Oh well a new story to add to the list

    Glad to hear that things went well for you and I hear that chicks dig guys with scars!! I guess that it's ok to laugh about it now. You should have taken a picture with the instructor shaking your hand and giving you your logbook and blood running down.

  13. #13
    Member ocnfish's Avatar
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    Default BFR be careful

    Did you hear about the Comanche 180 that crashed on a power off aproach on runway 1 at Birchwood. Could not get the engine to power up when it looked like they were going to be short of the runway. It happened about two weeks ago. Instructor and student were ok but it looked like the airplane was totaled. When doing the performance part of the BFR remember you know what your plane will do and if the instructor wants to push a little beyond those limits, just say no.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by tboehm View Post
    Glad to hear that things went well for you and I hear that chicks dig guys with scars!! I guess that it's ok to laugh about it now. You should have taken a picture with the instructor shaking your hand and giving you your logbook and blood running down.
    Well I was back today at the FBO where "the incident" [or"accident"] occurred[refer to NTSB part 830] and it turned into a contest over who had done the most damage to themselves walking into a wing. The winner? A old hand who walked into a pitot tube and had the paper punch scar to prove it. I hope you're right about the chicks-I look like I lost a knife fight.

  15. #15
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    Default BFRs

    ok, I am laughing my butt off with these stories of running into the parts of the airplane. I would have a wise remark, like " hope your situational awareness gets a little better!!"

    Honestly when I give a BFR it's just like what Float Pilot said. I tailor it to what the type of flying they do and introduce a few things. It's a tune up more than anything. I try to make it a fun learning expierence. I WANT them to come back, everyone needs a refresher every once in awhile.

  16. #16
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    Anyone in the vally giving bfr's

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by TBLOOMA View Post
    ok, I am laughing my butt off with these stories of running into the parts of the airplane. I would have a wise remark, like " hope your situational awareness gets a little better!!"

    Honestly when I give a BFR it's just like what Float Pilot said. I tailor it to what the type of flying they do and introduce a few things. It's a tune up more than anything. I try to make it a fun learning expierence. I WANT them to come back, everyone needs a refresher every once in awhile.
    the CFI was pretty good on that. I said I would like to work on cross wind landings so thats what 80% of it was.[being a non professional if the wind looks bad I just don't go] It was a little new to me because my old CFI is no longer in Anchorage,and I wondered if I was going to get a hard nose. [Well I may after the skin grafts are done]

  18. #18

    Default Suggestion

    I need to get mine done. Can you recommend an instructor in Anchorage? PM if you prefer.
    Thanks!

  19. #19

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    I just did mine with Land and Sea aviation in the hanger dot net building in thier little 7eca. Was a good guy, thourough and treated it very much like a learning excercise. 1 hour groud and 1 hour flight.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by bjb View Post
    I need to get mine done. Can you recommend an instructor in Anchorage? PM if you prefer.
    Thanks!
    Tom Myer at Aero tech. I may not be spelling the last name right[I only have a signature to look at],just ask for Tom. He has been around, not a 251 hour CFI. Just say Jim with the bloody nose referred you I knew him when he first started,it was all about building hours[his] but at this stage he seems more concerned with the needs of the customers.

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