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Thread: Ok i need help

  1. #1
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    Default Ok i need help

    Hello, Im not huge into muzzleloading (besides my .32 cal hawken that i shoot for fun) and a guy from my church gave me a build it yourself muzzleloader kit from CVA that has barrels for .50 and .54 caliber. ive never built a rifle let alone a muzzleloader and ive read the manual but it seems like its going to be really confusing. Is there any advice out there for making it so that it doesnt look REALLY bad. I'd hate to waste such a nice present

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    Default another question

    I'm thinking i want to build the .54 cal barrel but ive been reading this thread and it sounds like .50's with NO EXCUSE bullets do really well. But with this rifle the twist rate is 1:66'' and i dont know if i could use a conical affectively with it. PLEASE answer my questions (if you have time)

  3. #3
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    Default

    i am not an experienced builder, but a 1:66 twist is a round ball barrel.
    there are a couple very knowledgeable folks kicking around here (rimfire matt and brwnbear) and i am sure they will chime in... don't feel ignored, our winter just ended and folks are outside as much as possible, and not here as often as in the winter.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
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    Default

    That CVA kit should be a good start. I recently put one of their pistol kits together. Fpr the most part I was able to assemble it right out of the box.

    Now one thing you can do is just put all the parts (dont screw or do anything though) together or at least as together as they go. And just visualize what you need to do to get them all to fit.

    Maybe order your self a book like "the art of the penssylvania Longrifle" And get used to what the parts are called.

    You can always ask us a question on here or go over to the traditional muzzle loader forum.

    I think you will find it to be pretty intuitive and fun. Get started and ask questions wnhen you need to.

    Dont rush or get into a hurry, if in doubt ask questions, and listen to a couple different answers before deciding wich is the best one to follow!

    AIH has pretty good wood vices for about 50 bucks I think, youll need one of those and a couple of (small) chisels. A good work bench and your set.

  5. #5

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    My advice is this, while you build your rifle take your time and not too force any pieces into the stock, the lock with hammer should be a tight fit as is the case with other pieces which are inlaid. You should fit everything together and check for fit, disassemble and reassemble. I mentioned not forcing things, this is especially true when you have put the barrel on the stock and are inserting the wedge pin through the escutcheons, the wedge should be pushed through with your thumb and not hammered into place as this could split the stock. You might need to bend or arch the wedge pin a bit to get the right fit. Be careful here. I would finish both barrels. There is tons of information available on the INTERNET to help with your project, I'll look forward to photo's when you're finished. Good luck!

  6. #6

    Default Twist

    Don't let the rifles twist deter you from building the rifle you want. You'll find shooting PRBs fun and they are capable of taking many small and large game animals, up to and including Black Bear.
    So take your time and build yourself a good-looking, accurate shooting smokepole.
    Good Luck !!
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

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    Default FINALLY gettin there!

    Took me over a year to get to this point, mainly didnt have time But Finally got her ready to be finished. Gonna use Birchwood Casey Plum Brown Barrel Finish and Birchwood Casey stock finish. .54 Caliber CVA hawken with parts older than me getting New life.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8

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    You're doing great work and making fine progress.

    I've got one question to ask before you start using the BC Plum Brown: How big is your oven? That's because the only time I've seen it turn out well is when you have really uniform heat along the whole barrel for application, something that's just not possible with a torch. If the barrels won't fit in your oven (along with a good oven thermometer), I'd have serious second thoughts about using it.

    I've had really good results using Laurel Mountain Forge Barrel Brown and Degreaser. No heat required. Click on the page for directions on how to use it, just to see how easy it is. In Estes Park I suspect you'll need to have some arrangement for high humidity to make it work faster. I've hung the stuff in a shower and put a crockpot of water on high to achieve this, but folks also make "sweat boxes" of plywood heated by a lightbulb with the humidity provided by a damp rag.

    While you're at the LMF site, look over their finishes, and especially their stains. Maple and other hardwoods can be tough to stain, but the LMF stains work wonders.

    Again, contratulations, and keep up the good work. You're really going to like shooting that great rifle.

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    I second the recommendation for the Laurel Mountain Forge products. The stains are outstanding, and the barrel brown works fine if you follow the instructions. Just don't try to put on too much at a time, and never rub it in. I have used both it and the BC Plum Brown. I used a torch to heat the parts when I used the Plum Brown, and it worked ok. You will have to use three to four applications to get an even finish, and even then it won't look very good until you oil it. It looks from the pictures you might want to remove a little wood on the forend so the wood flows into the metal.

  10. #10
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    Yeah, i took the picture before all of the sanding was complete and now that it is finished the entire look is much better. My dad is pretty dead-set on the BC finish for the barrel, so even when used in the oven is it best to put on several coats? And thanks for all the help guys, it's really making this an easier project to complete.

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    You will probably need at least 2, possibly 3 applications of the Plum Brown in order to get good results. Make sure you do it somewhere with good ventillation. I did it outside in the driveway. The solution sizzles when you swab it onto the hot metal and the fumes are very caustic. For applicators I wrapped some steel wire around cotton balls and left a short length of wire for a handle. That worked pretty good. You want the metal to be 250-275 degrees when you put the Plum Brown on. If you are using an oven to heat the barrel, I suggest heating it up to 300. by the time you get it to where you are going to apply the Plum Brown, it probably will have cooled down into that range. I made a rack out of scrap lumber that I could hang my barrel and other parts from using steel wire while applying the solution. That worked pretty good. Congratulations on finishing your project, and have fun.

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    Default Might get LMF

    I've somewhat convinced my dad to help me use the Laurel Mountain Forge Browning Solution, but he's not sold because he think's we're going to need to use the quart sized solution. Somebody tell me that its not going to take a quart of that solution to brown the barrel and a few steel parts! Even two of those 2.5 oz containers should be enough shouldnt they??????????

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    Quote Originally Posted by YoungGunner View Post
    I've somewhat convinced my dad to help me use the Laurel Mountain Forge Browning Solution, but he's not sold because he think's we're going to need to use the quart sized solution. Somebody tell me that its not going to take a quart of that solution to brown the barrel and a few steel parts! Even two of those 2.5 oz containers should be enough shouldnt they??????????
    ONE of the 2.5 oz bottles is enough for at least TWO guns!

  14. #14

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    Way more than enough to do the job, probably enough to do two rifles. If you follow the advice from Brown Bear you'll be more than pleased with the results.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by YoungGunner View Post
    I've somewhat convinced my dad to help me use the Laurel Mountain Forge Browning Solution, but he's not sold because he think's we're going to need to use the quart sized solution. Somebody tell me that its not going to take a quart of that solution to brown the barrel and a few steel parts! Even two of those 2.5 oz containers should be enough shouldnt they??????????
    The others said it, but I'll add to the chorus. I got three guns out of one of those small bottles. No kidding! You just barely dampen the metal with it on each application, and the less you use, the better it works. Here is the instruction sheet for it. It's not as fast as Plum Brown, but the results are lots more authentic to my eye. Best of all, it's easy. It will be kinda disappointing after doing the first treatment because so little happens, but it comes on fast with each successive treatment. The more humid the place you hang your metal the faster it works, bot "fast" is a relative term. I figure on 3-5 days. Just don't sand the metal too fine (I prefer no finer than 220 grit sandpaper) and don't rub or "card" it much between treatments.

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