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Thread: 96" vs 84" wide boat bottom, is it worth it?

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    Member Maast's Avatar
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    Default 96" vs 84" wide boat bottom, is it worth it?

    The 26 foot boat I'm ordering has an option for a 96 inch wide bottom instead of the standard 84" bottom.

    It costs about 4K more, it would make the interior bigger (cuddy, etc) which would be more comfortable, it'd also be more stable, however I can also see a wee bit more drag.
    The big attraction for me is the bigger cuddy.

    So, in your opinion is it worth it?

  2. #2

    Talking

    BIGGER IS BETTER! Drag is irrelavent you can afford it, speed of a boat is limited by the length of the hull. Width of the boat is a comfort factor regarding interior space and rocking and rolling in the rough. No one ever drowned wishing there boat was narrower.

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    Member Ellamar's Avatar
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    Go wide...will get up on plane faster as well and the motor won't be working so hard to keep it up on step.

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    Default too wide means permits

    I don't know how wide your boat is on the trailer but I think you need permits for oversize vehicle @ 9'. ( I think) Maybe a consideration if you trailer alot.

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    Wider is better. More room and less rocking and rolling. You will be over 8.5' and need an over size permit. It really is not a big deal. You can purchase a season permit and the only real limitations are that you cannot trailer on the big weekends: Memorial Day, the 4th of July and Labor Day weekends.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    Go wide ! Stability is nice not to mention extra room. You won't regret it.
    Actually 96" comes out to 8 feet, shoot i would go 8.5 (102" ) if you can and your trailer is also under 8.5'
    when i was doing wide load there also was restriction with 1/2 hr before and after sunset ( only daylight travel) with 96" not an issue. It has been a few years so maybe that has changed. Or maybe changes with season permit?????
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
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    Member Maast's Avatar
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    Default 96 inches wide it is then

    I was leaning towards that anyway, I went and looked up the regs too and the max is 102".

    With the sides slanting outwards just a bit it'll probably end up 102" anyway but there won't be any restrictions on towing.

    Which leads me to the next question surge or electric brakes (new thread)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maast View Post
    I was leaning towards that anyway, I went and looked up the regs too and the max is 102".

    With the sides slanting outwards just a bit it'll probably end up 102" anyway but there won't be any restrictions on towing.

    Which leads me to the next question surge or electric brakes (new thread)
    With a 96" bottom I suspect you will be wider than 8.5'. Most sides slant out a bit more than you think. I suspect your beam will be 9'+. I just measured my boat's bottom at 102" and I have a 10' beam for comparison. What boat are you getting?

    I would go electric on the brakes. I wish I would have. The electric sure would be nice when you are backing a load that is twice that of your truck down the ramp. They are also handy if/when you start to fish tail. Just tap the actuator and the trailer comes back to where you want it.
    Last edited by spoiled one; 05-05-2009 at 20:29. Reason: forgot something
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  9. #9

    Smile

    Spoiled One said " I would go electric on the brakes."

    I sure hope you mean ELECTRIC OVER HYDRAULIC! While I have heard of a few folks trying pure electric brakes, like those used on a travel trailer, they are not recommended for boats, especially in salt water.

    SB

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    Electric over hydraulic is the way I'll go, the suburban 2500 already has a electric brake controller.

    I'm getting a Sea Raider by Raider boats, initially I was going to go with Silverstreak of Canada, but their final quote was a heck of a lot higher than the inital quote - turns out they charge through the nose to deviate from their base boat model.

    The more I looked into it the Raiders appear to have the best "bang-for-buck" value, they also have a really deep V bottom, which'll give a better ride - my fishing buddy and I can take a bumpy ride, the wife... not so much, she's not really a fan of boating anyway.

    Hmm so the side slants add about a foot to the width, I'll have to see what the boat papers say, I'd like to avoid towing restrictions.

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    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    Shark Bait,

    I put the Fulton Performance electric brakes on my boat trailer.

    LINK

    These electric brakes are specifically made for saltwater use. The metal is coated and all the electronics are sealed in an epoxy "puck". The electrical connections are greased and have very tight fitting rubber boots.

    I'm not a fan of surge brakes. The Fulton electrics are significantly cheaper than an electric-over-hydraulic system, so I figured I'd give them a go. I'll see how they work this season, and report my experiences in the fall.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maast View Post
    I was leaning towards that anyway, I went and looked up the regs too and the max is 102".

    With the sides slanting outwards just a bit it'll probably end up 102" anyway but there won't be any restrictions on towing.

    Which leads me to the next question surge or electric brakes (new thread)

    Looking at the Raider site http://www.raiderboats.com/modspec.html

    and 84" bottom is a 100' beam, while a 96" bottom is a 110" beam. Hope this helps.

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    Member Maast's Avatar
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    Ah, didnt see that, oh well, thanks for pointing that out

    I guess I'll be getting an oversize permit after all and stage the boat down in Whittier prior to the big weekends:


    PERMITTED
    oversize vehicles or vehicles with load that exceed 8’6in width, 16’0” in height (17’ in height from Fox Weight Station to Prudhoe Bay), front overhangs over 10’0”, rear overhangs over 4’0” and 75’0”(45’/single units) in overall length are PROHIBITED from moving during the following holiday periods unless so allowed on the face of the permit:


    May 25, 2009................ MEMORIAL DAY...................... from 12 noon Friday, 5-22-09 until daylight hours Tuesday, 5-26-09
    July 4, 2009.................. INDEPENDENCE DAY............. from 12 noon Thursday, 7-2-09 until daylight hours Monday 7-6-09
    Sept. 7, 2009................ LABOR DAY............................. from 12 noon Friday, 09-04-09 until daylight hours Tuesday, 09-08-09
    May 31, 2010................ MEMORIAL DAY...................... from 12 noon Friday, 05-28-10 until daylight hours Tuesday, 06-01-10
    July 4, 2010.................. INDEPENDENCE DAY............. from 12 noon Friday, 07-02-10 until daylight hours Monday, 07-05-10
    Sept. 6, 2010................ LABOR DAY............................. from 12 noon Friday, 09-03-10 until daylight hours Tuesday, 09-07-10


    On permits endorsed with Hours of Darkness operation, moves may start at 12:01 A.M. rather than daylight hours on the dates indicated after a holiday. This includes Kenai Special Permits

  14. #14

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    I would be wanting a full 102 inches. Don't worry about drag, there probably isn't any difference, but the ride and room are worth every penny. You won't even remember the extra cost a couple of years from now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Wheels View Post
    I don't know how wide your boat is on the trailer but I think you need permits for oversize vehicle @ 9'. ( I think) Maybe a consideration if you trailer alot.
    102 inches and wider you need permits

  16. #16

    Post New Pilot Car Requirements

    For those who don't yet know, the pilot car requirements have recently changed to require a pilot car for towed loads exceeding 10 ft. 6 in. in width now. Oversize permits can be obtained by calling the Commercial Vehicle Customer Service Center at 365-1200 or 800-478-7636. The Service Center is online through Alaska DOT&PF.

  17. #17

    Default bigger/better!

    My 26' boat has a 8.5 foot beam because I can't afford a 10.5 inch beam. If I could I would.

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