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Thread: Weight for big Rainbows?

  1. #1
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Default Weight for big Rainbows?

    What weight set up is most appropriate for the big Rainbows you folks get?
    I have a 9 weight that i use for Silvers, but it seems to me i might like to get down to a 7 or 8 weight for the Rainbows. Planning a trip this fall don't want to be either over or under geared.
    Cheers

  2. #2
    Member bigcox's Avatar
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    I would say a nice 7 weight will be just right. I hooked into some pretty big bows last year with my 6 weight and they got in the current and just schooled me, the fun is in the fight though. Some people use as light as 5 weights even.

    Fish On!
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    Guess it depends if your going to be fishing in the lakes or rivers or both? I like my 8 weight on the rivers just in case something other then a trout hits.

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    Member ptarmigan's Avatar
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    4-6 wt north of Anchorage, 7-8 wt on the Kenai for me. Playing a fish is fun but I try to get them in quick so not to overtire them. I like the take and the first run best anyways. If you are on a gravel bar on the Kenai and you hook into a 20lb bow you will appreciate a little backbone in your rod.

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    Member Sockeye Scott's Avatar
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    Default 7 or 8 weight is good

    I use a seven weight on the Kenai, but I also have a six weight for my backup rod. It is a little too light for big bows. The next rod I buy will be an eight weight.

    Scott

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    Quote Originally Posted by ptarmigan View Post
    4-6 wt north of Anchorage, 7-8 wt on the Kenai for me. Playing a fish is fun but I try to get them in quick so not to overtire them. I like the take and the first run best anyways. If you are on a gravel bar on the Kenai and you hook into a 20lb bow you will appreciate a little backbone in your rod.

    Twenty pounds eh....I know we're all fishermen here but come on now...

  7. #7
    Member BlueMoose's Avatar
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    Default Lot's of factors however

    A lot of the choice will have to do with what area of the state your fishing as stated Kenia 7-8W for bigger bows. That being said you might find your-self with the same issue in Bristol bay if that is your destination.

    If your fishing the Parks systems then a 5-6W will do you fine or a quality 4W depending on the stream and flow.

    You should not be under-gunned with a 7/8W no matter what system your fishing for Trout and if you are please call me I would be willing to assist in your catching. I think the general rule of thumb comes down to averages vesres the what-ifs. If the place your fishing the average bow is 20-26 inches with the occasional 30 your in there with the 7/8W

    Tight Lines and Best Wishes!

    Blue Moose

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    I agree with the weight class (7wt in particular).. you may also want a longer 10' rod to better cast large flies and to mend the line more easily. Good luck!

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    Member Wyatt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptarmigan View Post
    4-6 wt north of Anchorage, 7-8 wt on the Kenai for me. Playing a fish is fun but I try to get them in quick so not to overtire them. I like the take and the first run best anyways. If you are on a gravel bar on the Kenai and you hook into a 20lb bow you will appreciate a little backbone in your rod.
    Even an honest 20# steelhead is rare!

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    I second the 10 ft. 7 wght.

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    33 1/2 x 22 in my avatar. L x G2 / 800 = 20.2675 lbs. No I dont throw em on a boga or another scale but thats close enough for me. 8wt sage TCR feels about right for those trout. Like I said you can use smaller but I want my fish to swim away right side up. Yes it is true that 20lb Steelhead are hard to come by, we taped AND weighed 3-39" fish last week that came in at 18lbs, not the same girth as Kenai bows. I do have a pic of me with a 42" steelhead that I am sure hits the mark. Most people dont believe they are there because they never get to handle one, thats OK with me as that leaves more fight in them for our group. Again, go heavy and save the long fight for the salmon you want to take home.

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    Member ptarmigan's Avatar
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    Sage TCR 890, check, Ross evolution 3.5, check, Rio Clouser WFF, check, 12lb test tippet, check, 20lb bow, check.




  13. #13

    Angry Kasilof steelhead?

    That steelie looks like you hooked it at the Kasilof River and it is clearly has been removed from the water. VERY BAD IF IT IS. The Situk steelies will at some point will also have to left in the water.

  14. #14

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    Awesome fish Ptarmigan. And according to your post on how you prefer a heavier rod as to not wear your fish out, I'm sure those fish swam away in prime condition. And It looks like you handled and supported those fish well when taking the pics so as to not injure them. Good Job! I hope I get into some monsters like that on my trip up this fall.

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    Member ptarmigan's Avatar
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    Not Kasilof, and before the spawn starts. Only steelhead on the Kasilof for me is incidental while king fishing, and after looking at the marks on their mouths from all the king gear I feel real bad about hooking one. I try to treat trout with like I would my kid, with the exception of a sharp hook in the mouth.

  16. #16
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Default Wow!

    Nice fish!
    Thanks for the great info gents.
    I use a 5 wght in a Scott/Hardy combo for most of my Grayling/Trout, and a 10'6 9 weight HMG for silvers and Sockeye, but feel the 9 is overkill.
    Sounds like a good excuse for a 10' 7 wght.
    Cheers

  17. #17

    Default EL' Porko

    NOT you, the FISH. Anyone fishing waters in Alaska with less than a an 7 wt. with the intent of catch and release, is an axxhat. And yes AXXhat is a misspelled. Don't kill your dance partners.

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    Wow what pigs!! I WANT ONE!!

    Thanks for helping, I was planning on bringing my 5wt, but now maybe I think I'll bring and use my 8wt instead just in case. Just wow!


    Quote Originally Posted by ptarmigan View Post
    Sage TCR 890, check, Ross evolution 3.5, check, Rio Clouser WFF, check, 12lb test tippet, check, 20lb bow, check.




  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tailingloop View Post
    NOT you, the FISH. Anyone fishing waters in Alaska with less than a an 7 wt. with the intent of catch and release, is an axxhat. And yes AXXhat is a misspelled. Don't kill your dance partners.

    I'll give you the benefit of the doubt that maybe you left a few words out. If not, I'll just continue to be the rebel that I am and keep using much, much lighter gear for my grayling fishing, and maybe a lot of the lake fishing too. If you're referring to fishing in trophy rainbow waters (which includes the Parks Hwy streams)... I'd be really close to agreeing with you except that I don't like to use less than a 6 wt., although I prefer a 7 or 8 on the Kenai.

    And if you stand by what you said completely, I'm okay with being an axxhat in your eyes.

  20. #20
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    Default Something else that needs said....

    regarding the weight of what you use. I often run 10 to 12 pound Maxima for my rainbow leaders....that's not too far off of weed wacker chord, and takes a lot of the responsibility in how fast I can retrieve a fish. If that sucker is trying to school me and I can't turn him with the rod.....POINT IT AT HIM (her)...if you break off...so what, you're in AK and there are more....if not, you will spin them on a dime and then you are in control once again.

    I watch lots of guys with six weights fish out in Bristol Bay...heck, I'm one of em...but, if you have 6-8 pound flourocarbon...you have no control and they often play the bijeezes out of the fish because they are so undergunned. But, if they had proper leader material, they could finish things off much more cleanly despite the small rods.

    For me, it takes a pretty mighty fish to (I'd say at 28 inches plus) to leave me in the screwed category when it comes to rainbows with my 6 wt. Often when I'm throwing the eight wt, it's so I can huck the big furry flies better or farther.

    All this said, a seven or eight weight on decen rainbow waters is a good safe bet all the way around.

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