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Thread: Halibut line

  1. #1
    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    Default Halibut line

    I picked up a halibut pole recently and looked at the rating. The pole is rated for over 100 lb line. It seems like it would be tough to hold a pole with more then 100lbs pulling down on it. So is there a point in getting line heavier then 100 lbs.

  2. #2
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    What exactly is the line rating printed on the rod?
    Usually the ratings cover a range such as 60-100#, 8-12# etc.
    The best course of action is to get a line in the middle of the range it is rated for, this way you don't over stress the rod or break off constantly if the line is below the rating. For the two examples above figure on 80# and 10# as the line I would put on those rods.
    Clear as mud?

  3. #3
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    People can get a bit carried away with rods and lines when fishing halibut. You'll find that not many folks run more than 20-30#'s of drag on their reels, so you aren't pulling anywhere neer 100#'s with the rod, though it might feel like it. Just tie a 30# dumbell on your rod and try and lift it. The advantage of the heavier lines is they can take a bit more abrasion before you have to replace them, which is good if you're running a charter and don't want to be respooling your reels every week or two. So long as you aren't continually tangling lines and abraiding them you can get by with lighter lines.

    The downside of heavy lines is multiple. You have to run heavier weights or jigs in a tide, as the larger dia line "catches" more of the tide, and you need more weight to hold bottom. With more weight you wear yourself out right quick and spend less time fishing. With larger line people typically upsize their reels, which adds more weight to the rig, and wears you out quicker. The downside of the some of the smaller reels is that while they can hold plenty of braid, the drags aren't up to abuse, so you need to balance that out when choosing a reel.

    The heaviest line I run is 80#, but I've pretty much moved to 50 and 65#. The line ratings to me are pretty much meaningless as it's the flex curve of the rod I'm concerned with. I have 50# braid on a nominal 40# rod, and 65# on a 50-100# rod.

    If you're planning to catch sharks, I can see 130# braid, but I can't see it for day in day out halibut and ling fishing.

  4. #4
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    I run 80# power pro. I like how small dia it is. I can get away with using less weight on ripping tides
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    Default

    Ok, that makes sence. I just couldn't imagine holding 100lbs on the end of a rod.

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    Daiwa (if I remember right) has a new braid that is color coded for depth and is the thinnest braid I have ever seen. Got it at B&J's when I bought a new Avet 6/3 there. It appears to be amost half the diameter of PLine Spectrex (which I use on all my other reels). A couple of weekends ago I was jigging for butt's out of Homer in 150' of water with a 5 oz jig and my line was straight down ALL the time. Granted the tides were pretty mellow but that really is impressive.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by bushboy View Post
    Daiwa (if I remember right) has a new braid that is color coded for depth and is the thinnest braid I have ever seen. Got it at B&J's when I bought a new Avet 6/3 there. It appears to be amost half the diameter of PLine Spectrex (which I use on all my other reels). A couple of weekends ago I was jigging for butt's out of Homer in 150' of water with a 5 oz jig and my line was straight down ALL the time. Granted the tides were pretty mellow but that really is impressive.
    I use this line in 100# test. It has proven to be very good line, very abrasion resistant, and the color markings are nice as you can see what depth you are at a glance. I have been using this stuff for 2 yrs. now.

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    I use 100 lb powerpro, usually if I get hung up on the bottom and I cant get it free I cleat that sucker off and pull it off with the boat. 75% of the time I get it back.

  9. #9

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    if you fish alot 100+ lb if you are just a weekend fisherman go smaller. guiding i wont use less than 100 lb just for durabuility.

  10. #10
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Gray View Post
    I run 80# power pro. I like how small dia it is. I can get away with using less weight on ripping tides
    Yup, 80# Power Pro works for me too.
    Now what ?

  11. #11
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default best buy

    So where is the best place in Anchorage to pickup the power pro 80? Looks like it runs about 150$ for 1500 yards.

    How much line to you spool up on each reel?

    Do you start with any mono backing to keep it from spinning loose - or some rubber on the reel or straight up PP?

    Might have to call trustworthy in slowdotna for pricing too.....

  12. #12
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The best deals on PP are off of e-bay.

    Personally I back my reels with dacron ~ 50 yds of 80# on a 4/0 reel works well and top them off with 200-300 yds of braid. Using braid as backing is expensive, and seems like a waste.

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    I fish Power Pro and i love it. On charters on the Great Lakes they get 2-3 years out of it. After that they reverse it on their reel and get a few more years out of it.

  14. #14

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    Ygk jigman is the best power pro is way behind the power curve in spectra research..............
    BONEYARDBAITS THE BEST HALIBUT, ROCKFISH GRUBS ON THE PLANET....''06'' WORLD RECORD LINGCOD ''08'' HOMER HALIBUT DERBY WINNER''. BOTH FISH CAUGHT WITH BONEYARDBAIT GRUBS WWW.BONEYARDBAITS.COM

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    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    80# Power Pro is the stuff for sure. Most charters use good ole' fashioned 80# Dacron though and it works fine.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  16. #16

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    power pro is the best stuff. 100 is just really tough with a pretty small dia. Thats what I use on all of my halibut gear. Like half 80 pound Dacron for backing(depending on the real size, half for Penn Senators cause thats what I have), then the rest with Moss Green Power Pro. Can't go wrong with it.

  17. #17
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default Pp 80

    I picked up a spool of 1500 yards at Trustworthy for 119 plus tax so it was 126$.

    What are the tricks for spooling it up nice and tight on reels without a guide?

    Do you use some mono or dacron for backing to use up some of the space? I was thinking of just using the 50 pound mono that I alredy have on my reels as backing......really shouldn't get into the backing if I spool up with 250 yards or so.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    I picked up a spool of 1500 yards at Trustworthy for 119 plus tax so it was 126$.

    What are the tricks for spooling it up nice and tight on reels without a guide?

    Do you use some mono or dacron for backing to use up some of the space? I was thinking of just using the 50 pound mono that I alredy have on my reels as backing......really shouldn't get into the backing if I spool up with 250 yards or so.
    The best trick know of is to have the store do it for you on their machine. If you get a halfway comptetent person they'll get it on nice and tight.

    I use dacron as a backing and then spool up 200-250 yards of braid. he dacron is heavier than my braid, and I trust it not to break if i ever get spooled down that far into the reel.

  19. #19

    Default Best line at the best price

    Go to B&J's in Anchorage and ask for Fonzo and tell him that David sent you in and he will hook you up with what you want and or need. I had him put new line on 8 of my reels.


    Later
    Moose

  20. #20
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    300 yards 130# Tuf line Plus, 100# dacron braid backing, Shimano TLD 30, Shimano Trevala XXH rod. Light, strong, responsive.
    Matt Drayton, Chef de Cuisine
    Captain Steve's Fishing Lodge
    www.captainstevesfishinglodge.com

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