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Thread: Anyone help teach me flyfishing?

  1. #1

    Default Anyone help teach me flyfishing?

    I'll be moving up to Nancy Lake area for 3 months this summer and have always wanted to learn to fly-fish but never gotten a chance. I thought about buying some gear and trying to learn while I'm up there but was wondering if anyone might not mind teaching me the basics and/or fishing with me at some point.

  2. #2
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    Default Have your cake and eat it, too...

    Book a short trip with Richard of Blue Moose Rafting and float the upper Gulkana. The trip is reasonable, the waters are so full of grayling and rainbow they smell of fish, and the Moose is an Orvis endorsed fly instructor.

    What he did for me, he can do for you.

    You'll love it...

    Rosenberg/Florida
    "Two decades researching and defining fishing opportunities in the Last Frontier!"


  3. #3
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    That's a good idea Bernie shared with you, if you want to go a different route I believe the University has a flyfishing course this summer also.

  4. #4
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Rick P on this forum does some private instructing too.
    he is in the valley.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

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    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    When are you coming up? The wife and I do spring pike fishing there. I can bring my fly rod and we can throw some lines out.

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Go out in the driveway and give it a few casts, ( without the hook ) Learn how to lay it down where you want it to land. Self taught myself pretty quick. Once you get the hang of laying out 30-40 feet of line where you want it, start crowding in closer to some brush. Learn how to bring it in from the side without catching yourself. The brush ( or the people ) behind you is your biggest challange.

  7. #7

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    Thanks for the suggestion Bernie...I'll definitely look into it.

    Quote Originally Posted by big_dog60 View Post
    When are you coming up? The wife and I do spring pike fishing there. I can bring my fly rod and we can throw some lines out.
    I'll be up on Sunday night (May 10th) and will be there until mid-August.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rock_skipper View Post
    Go out in the driveway and give it a few casts, ( without the hook ) Learn how to lay it down where you want it to land. Self taught myself pretty quick. Once you get the hang of laying out 30-40 feet of line where you want it, start crowding in closer to some brush. Learn how to bring it in from the side without catching yourself. The brush ( or the people ) behind you is your biggest challange.
    My biggest thing is just wanting to learn the basics from someone who knows what they are doing so that I don't develop any bad habits that are hard to overcome later.

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    Mountain View Sports in Anchorage used to have instructors.....not sure if they still do as it has been a few years since I worked with them. I'm sure they have a website. Kenai River Fishing Academy, at the Kenai Peninsula College campus, is a week long fishing exposition teaching casting, the most effective use of flys, spinners, and boat trolled lures. I've heard a lot of good comments from people who have attended.

  9. #9
    Member NickofTime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twist View Post
    I'll be moving up to Nancy Lake area for 3 months this summer and have always wanted to learn to fly-fish but never gotten a chance. I thought about buying some gear and trying to learn while I'm up there but was wondering if anyone might not mind teaching me the basics and/or fishing with me at some point.
    Only if you're hot, blonde, Swedish, female, and at least 18!

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by NickofTime View Post
    Only if you're hot, blonde, Swedish, female, and at least 18!
    If I ever run into what you just described, I'm pretty sure I won't be worrying about fishing!

  11. #11
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Buy this video...

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...set=ISO-8859-1

    It is by Lefty Kreh, fly fishing legend, and is a great intro to fly casting. He makes it easy to understand and it is not as boring as most instructional dvds I have seen. This is one thing I did when I got started and it made things click very well. Well worth the money.

    For a beginner, it would be hard to go wrong with one of the kits from Cabelas. My suggestion would be a 4 piece rod in the 5 wt or 6 wt range. That would be a pretty good place to start. This video and the rod/reel/line combo would set you back $200. Not bad for a complete set up with instructions.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...457&hasJS=true




    .
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  12. #12
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    Talking or you can

    watch "North to Alaska". Larry & Audry do lots of fly fishing.
    try to imitate Audry's casting, not Larry's. Larry could do a whole series on how not to cast a fly.
    Gary

  13. #13
    Member fishnngrinn's Avatar
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    Try public Library for videos on fly fishing. The Lousac library in Anchorage has a good selection.
    NRA Lifetime Member

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    Just buy a cheapo $30 dollar combo from walmart, they come as 7 weight rods most times. I've caught some of my biggest trout on a shakespeare walmart combo, casted some of my smallest most delicate flies, etc. There is a difference once you spend cash to get a higher end rod, but for starters, it'll work no problem.

    There are a few things that can be difficult to explain, but if you look up these terms, you'll be well on your way....."dead drift" and "mending fly line" are two that are extremely important. Experience will help you recognize these and correct any problems you are having with them, but you need to know what they are first.

    Once you have that, just head on out and learn to cast and fish with it. It's just fishing, remember that. Don't think too much, don't try too hard, just do it and let it come naturally. You don't need to cast like anyone other than you, so let yourself be your teacher. Just start flailing it around, I think you'll find that it's not as hard as you might think.

    Start out with dry flies, you get to practice more of your cast and get used to working the line out while casting. Then move onto other things like streamers, and nymphs.

    Hope this helps. I taught myself how to fly fish, grew up spin fishing. I didn't think casting was hard at all, but mending and dead drifting were totally new to me and took longer to feel comfortable with.

    Also, hope you've hit the lottery, cause you'll have enough fly gear for 10 people sooner than you think

  15. #15
    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Iagree with Phil except this statement. I catch a lot more fish sub surface.
    Start out with dry flies, you get to practice more of your cast and get used to working the line out while casting. Then move onto other things like streamers, and nymphs.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  16. #16
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Agree with Garnede 110%.

    Subsurface is where it is at. The WF (floating) line is fine, use a 7.5' or 9' leader and a split shot or two. Get the fly down where the fish are. Beadhead woolly buggers in black or olive size #4 are a great all around fly. Hit a local fly shop and they will tell you plenty. But definately don't think of flyfishing as using dry flies only. That is just the tip of the iceberg. Especially when fishing in Alaska.

    A great book...

    "Topwater, Flyfishing Alaska..." by Troy Letherman and Tony Weaver

    It is on the forum store in the fishing section. Fantastic book.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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