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Thread: for all you electrical experts... battery switch question

  1. #1
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    Default for all you electrical experts... battery switch question

    Ok, I'm the first to admit that I am no electrician but it seems pretty straight forward. Apparently I'm missing something. I was attempting to replace my battery isolator switch. I connected all positives to the common post then proceeded to connect one battery to post 1 and the second battery to post 2. I connected them just the way the other switch was wired. That said, I switch on to #1 and it works fine. I switch to #2 and nothing. I put the volt meter on the #2 post and it reads 12.6 volts, but when I switch it on it does not charge the common. Could it be that a new switch is bad? It get better, this is why I replaced the original switch it was doing the same thing. I find it hard to believe that both switches would have the same problem. It must be me. Help!!!!!! Weather like this we should all be fishing...

  2. #2

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    Could be a bad #2 cable or clamp. If the cable is shot you could still show a voltage, but corrosion could be bad enough not to allow current to flow. A digital volt meter will show voltage when there is no available power sometimes. An anolog meter has enough built-in impedence so it doesn't show the "false" voltage. Where are you located?

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    Default wiring diagram?

    I am adding a gps / radar, and pot puller, and want to make sure my 3-way switch is wired correctly. Currently batt. 1 post on the switch has a lead that goes to the battery terminal and one that goes to the windlass, and batt. 2 has a lead the the second battery, this sounds different than the earlier post? Does anyone know a link to a wiring diagram for proper installation, or know a good procedure to test the system to assure the pos. 1 switch does the house and pos. 2 does the motor?

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    Member SusitnaAk's Avatar
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    http://forums.iboats.com/Marine-Electronics/Perko Maybe could find answer here? secound one, has a photo, hopes this helps!http://bluewatermarinesvc.com/html/bat_switch.html
    Last edited by SusitnaAk; 05-03-2009 at 10:13. Reason: more

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    Ok I looked at mine in the yard, The common goes to starter of motor, Batt 1 pos, of batt goes to postion one on swicth, Same for batt 2 pos, of batt goes to postion 2 on switch, neg,s are grounded on motor and boat, Now than any aux stuff i put on the batt, pos, so have two wires to connect, the main cable and the item i want to run. with neg grounded same place, from the item, Hard to explain, Like my Auto bilg. pump, it is, Hot all the time, to the no#,2 batt on my boat. Keep switch set on two when parked or off it only can kill batt, 2 still leaves batt 1 to start. hoping this, make sense, lets know what you come up with. Also when i fire up i move the switch to both, charges both when driving back.

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    I found what I needed to on the link, thank you!
    I am going to rewire all power leads to the common, using the switch as designed. I can't find any reason why a aux power would be dedicated to one battery, as long as the switch is in the correct position Thank you for the help

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    Smile

    Good deal,! Mine is set up, like the one in the secound link. With the common goin to the starter. pump hot, Batt #2 And the Aux stuff, on Batt#2 Also,I guess i just don,t want to forget the switch end up with two dead Batt,s Or be playing with the GPS in the yard and leave it on, I added 84hr,s to my boat when i first bought it Didn,t even touch the water.

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    We must have been replying at the same time. I think I get what you are saying and it makes a little more sense to me than going with all leads off the common. If I understand right, with all aux leads connected straight to the battery terminal (deep cycle) the switch would have turned to that battery for the systems to run, and the starting battery (cranking) would be totally isolated and safe.
    Basicly, start engine on pos 1 (cranking batt.) move to both for charging while running out, at the hole switch to deep cycle on pos 2 to use house power on 2 only, and the starting battery is isolated from draw while anchored.
    I borrowed a meter to test the amp draw on each batt. as I turn everything off and on, hopefully that will assure it works right.
    Thank you again for the help!

  9. #9
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    Default While you're disconnecting things, test the switch

    While you're in the mood to change wires, take a bit more time, remove all the wiring on your switch, and test it with your volt meter on the Ohm scale ( or a continuity test setting, if you have one ) to verify the switch works correctly. Once you accomplish this, you'll know if the switch is defective, or not, and you can illiminate the switch as a potential problem, and focus on your wiring setup.

    I'm assuming your switch is probably set up as : Off- Bat 1 - Bat 2 - Both.

    Take you meter, put it on the Ohm scale, and touch your two meter needles together. Notice what this reads out on your meter--- this represents a "closed" or "made" curcuit. This is what we refer to as Continuity.

    With one meter needle on the Common terminal, set the switch to Bat1 and check for continuity between Common & Bat1 terminal. Then set it to Bat2, and check continuity between Common and Bat2. Then while still on this setting, check between Common and Bat1 and make sure it's dead ( open circuit ). Next, set switch to "Both", and verify continuity between Common and Bat1 and Bat2, respectively. Set switch to "Off", and verify you have no continuity between Common and Bat1 or Bat2, or Both.

    You do all these tests with NO VOLTAGE applied to switch. You're simply checking the operation of the manual switching of the various contacts on your switch. If the switch responds as stated above-- you have a perfectly good switch. In fact, you could also check your old switch, and you may find you now have the additional benefit of a perfectly good Backup switch...

    Bill

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