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Thread: Survival gear: 5 things

  1. #1
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Survival gear: 5 things

    There is already a long running (2006!), very informative thread on survival kits:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ead.php?t=3664

    And a couple of other threads on the subject too:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ead.php?t=3839
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=19414
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=29798
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=29798
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=20031
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ead.php?t=5510
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...d.php?p=472433


    but - if I had to limit the stuff in my pockets to five essential items that I might really always carry:

    1. Water purification tabs
    2. Stormproof matches (or other firemaking item)
    3. A strong knife
    4. Signal mirror
    5. Water bottle...big pocket? Useful enough item to figure out some way.

    I'm sure everyone will agree .

    Several years ago, in a story ya never think will happen to you, a buddy and I hiked way up a small creek fishing. As the deadfalls got too thick, we figured to shortcut across a ridge to the headwaters/lake. Well, flat-light gray skies (featureless sky) set in, we got into some flat woods (featureless terrain), got further from the stream -which started on our left, but ended up on our right (a bad sign BTW) and realized when we finally found the lake, that we weren't positive WHICH lake it was. And all I had with me (besides flyfish gear) was a knife, one granola bar, water bottle and water purification tabs. (The knife being useful for defending my granola bar from Steve) No matches. No mirror or other signaling device.

    I guess the bottom line is - take this stuff seriously.
    But, anything different in your "fave five"? Or what would be your item #6?
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    I think for most places I'd go with:
    1) leatherman
    2) Box of Good matches
    3) Spool of twine, rope, or sturdy fishing line
    4) water container Preferably one of those steel canteens(which should be full at the start of the trip)
    5)Map of the area

    My item #6 to your list would be the my # 3.
    My item #6 to my list would probably be a box of fishing hooks.

  3. #3
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    Im my pack i have a cheap 8x8 poly tarp. It weighs almost nothing and its an emergency shelter if need be. It will keep you dry and out of the wind.

  4. #4

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    My list is pretty much made up of what I consider to be essentials and not including your attire...I'm going under the assumption you are dressed correctly for the area/weather. Otherwise the whole dynamic is changed.

    1) my U.S. Marine Ka-bar knife
    2) FireSteel firestarter
    3) Water bottle (full before you leave)
    4) Some polycord or parachute cord
    5) Water purification tablets

  5. #5
    Member akjw7's Avatar
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    In the back of my mind is always the idea that if it's not on your body you have to plan to not have it in an emergency (plane crash, snow machine through the ice, sunk boat, etc). I have a lot of gear in my pack or mode of transport, but I always have a few key items that would help me survive an unexpected situation.

    This is what is in my pockets when out in the field - changes some based on season or terrain (i.e., in the mountains where no wood or shelter is available I have a couple space blankets and a couple tea candles - etc) I know the pocket kit is cheating, but I really carry it in my pocket so it's on the list!

    1. leatherman wave
    2. lifeboat waterproof matches in a brass match safe with a brunton compass on one end
    3. small pocket survival kit (sparklight and wet fire tinder, waterproof matches, freznel lens, length of mono line, sinkers, hooks, razor blade, water tablets, signal mirror, and a few other little things I can't remember)
    4. long life flashlight or headlamp (except in the height of summer) and extra AAs for flashlight or #5
    5. SPOT
    I guess fire is kind of my priority as I always have at least three different methods of starting a fire along with some tinder that will go easily even wet.

    (my #6 that is always there is a windproof butane lighter...more fire!)

    A better knife for pocket carry is the only thing I ever feel like I'm missing.

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    Default Spot!!

    I Had to use mine this past weekend to get rescued, it worked flawlesly, I recommend that all people should carry this unit....

  7. #7
    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    I've been thinking of getting a SPOT but had heard that some of the Alaska wilderness races banned them because they didn't want people depending on a rescue because they were concerned that people might get complacent or call in a rescue too early. There also was a concern that family members might get concerned if for some reason the reception was lost for a time and no check in occurred, thus initiating a rescue when one wasn't needed.

    I'm on the fence. I think it would be a great "last resort" tool. I definitely would continue to use my normal judgment and would only call for a rescue in the event of an injury or inability to get out on my own.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    Default Spot

    Quote Originally Posted by EagleRiverDee View Post
    I've been thinking of getting a SPOT but had heard that some of the Alaska wilderness races banned them because they didn't want people depending on a rescue because they were concerned that people might get complacent or call in a rescue too early. There also was a concern that family members might get concerned if for some reason the reception was lost for a time and no check in occurred, thus initiating a rescue when one wasn't needed.

    I'm on the fence. I think it would be a great "last resort" tool. I definitely would continue to use my normal judgment and would only call for a rescue in the event of an injury or inability to get out on my own.

    It was definately a last ditch effort before I pushed the button....

  9. #9
    Member akjw7's Avatar
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    I really didn't intend to cause another spot thread by listing mine as one of my 5 carry items...

  10. #10
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    Umm, compass anyone?


    First off I'm dressed for the weather:
    Then:
    I'd start with a compass
    Fire making stuff ( including bottle of ronsonol aka liquid kindling)
    High energy food
    Leatherman
    Mirror or signalling device
    Exstream water purifying bottle.

    and a pocket full of luck

  11. #11
    Member akjw7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akjw7 View Post
    1. lifeboat waterproof matches in a brass match safe with a brunton compass on one end
    umm...yes! It's not a full size compas, but it will do the job in a pinch.

  12. #12
    Member Tolman24's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruger357 View Post
    I Had to use mine this past weekend to get rescued, it worked flawlesly, I recommend that all people should carry this unit....
    Do you feel like elaborating? I have one and try and carry it. Just curious .

  13. #13
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    Talking Maybe a good topo map too?

    Without a map, the only thing a compass will do on an drizzly overcast day is keep you from going in circles.

  14. #14
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    1. Gerber multi tool
    2. Space blanket
    3. Water bottle that also purifies
    4. Signal mirror
    5. Waterproof matches with firestarter (I use vaseline saturated cottonballs)

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rovingarcher View Post
    Without a map, the only thing a compass will do on an drizzly overcast day is keep you from going in circles.
    that depends on whether or not you took a heading when you left your vehicle or camp....if not...it still helps when dead reckoning, and doesn't run out of batteries like the (cough cough) crutch we call a gps.

  16. #16
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    Talking So you took a heading....

    and head out of camp north,and travel 2 miles,then head south to get home....Think you'll hit your camp?I've found a couple guys who thought that would work.Maybe that's something we could have at our seminars on Saturday at the AK Bowhunters Banquet next March...An Outdoor Navigation class.

  17. #17
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    Default bugs?

    I did not see anybody mention bug stuff, either repellant or a head net. Now that it is spring, and we seem to be talking about walking, no way am I leaving the house without one or the other, amongst other things noted.
    My list:
    Fire starter (maintaining body heat is imperative)
    light weight space blanket (helps maintain heat and provides signal)
    compass (A way out if sitting put is not an option)
    bug protectant (AGGGGGGHHHHHH)
    #5 for me depends on where I am going or what I am doing.

  18. #18
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    I don't want to sound flippant here but what about a SPOT and Sat Phone?

    Ron

  19. #19
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrassLakeRon View Post

    I don't want to sound flippant here ...

    Ron
    Flippant??

    Good word man

    I had to look it up.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  20. #20
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    I don't really consider a head net, gloves and bug dope as survival stuff, more like absolute necessity. They are always in my pocket. Like American Express, never leave home with out them.

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