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Thread: 38-55 vs. .35 Rem

  1. #1

    Default 38-55 vs. .35 Rem

    Need a little feed back, please.

    How does the 38-55 compare to the .35 Rem caliber as a moose/deer cartridge?

    Opinions? Experiences?

    Open to all.

    Thanks, JWB

  2. #2
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Bullet Selection

    Although hunting with a classic like the 38-55 sounds like a neat idea, I think the bullet selection of the .35 Remy is much better as is the avialability of brass. The 38-55 is a little larger, a little slower, but probably just as capable. The 38-55 is seeing a comback in cowboy action shooting and some more modern firearms are being created for the once almost obsolete round. A reloader might be able to up velocity a tad to approach the .35 Remy.

    That said, I go with the 38-55 in a classic lever gun and hunt accordingly just for fun.
    "Never again shall one generation of Veterans abandon another".
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  3. #3

    Default

    If you hand load, they are about the same. If not, then use the .35R. Buffalo Bore uses a 220gr. Speer booolet (just getting into the spirit for tuesday) at about 2300fps out of a 20" bbl. That's what I use and it really dumps the Moose and Black Bears, but it's a little stiff for Deer.

    Dan

  4. #4
    Member alaska bush man's Avatar
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    Default 38-55 vs 375 Win

    The 38-55 is very close to the 375 Win...........
    Alaska

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default 38-55

    The Winchester & Ballard 38-55 was first chambered in the 1881 Marlin levergun and later their 1893. Winchester later chambered it in the 1894 Winchester lever action.
    The older guns like a bullet of .377 to .380 in diameter and they can be a bi$&^th to load into the brass unless you have an oversized expander plug.

    Lyman list loads for a 255 grain .376 jacketed bullet and a 249 grain cast lead bullet.
    With 30 grains of RL-7 they claim 1543 fps for the jacketed bullet from a 26 inch barreled Winchester M-94.
    They also claim the same velocity for the 249 grain cast bullet using 21.0 grains of IMR 4227.

    I have chronoed the newer Winchester factory ammo and it throws a 255 grain slug at 1,120 fps and had a pretty big group in an old M-94. (the size of a salad plate)

    34 grains of IMR 3031 will lauch a jacketed bullet to 1650fps, if you can find a good slug for your barrel diameter.

    44 grains BY VOLUME of Pyrodex will give you around 1250fps with a cast 255-265 grain slug if you want to make some smoke. (RCBS #38-255FN)
    I used SPG lube.

    The older Winchesters had a 1 in 18 twist and I think the old Marlins were slower, like one in 20...

    I just found this after I posted. It looks like they load some pretty zippy ammo for modern guns only.

    http://www.cpcartridge.com/3855win-P.htm


    The 35 Remington on the other hand, came out in 1908 as a rimless cartridge for use in the Remington Model 8 semi auto rifle.
    There are several loads for a 35 Rem using a 200 grain .358 diameter jacketed soft point.
    2000 fps seems to be the realistic top velocity for that bullet.
    39 grain of 4064, ww-748, or 4895 all sem to give about 2000fps out of a 20 inch Marlin.
    Lyman list a cast load for a 206 grain cast lead slug at 2000fps using 3031.
    You can also load .357 pistol type bullets into 35 Remington brass for chuckles and grins. I have not tried it. I did try it with a 358 Norma and they REALLY went fast. But they were so inaccurate that I shot my chronograph right off the tripod.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Personally I would go with the larger diameter bullet of the 38-55 and find a good hard cast bullet in the 250-270 grain range.

  7. #7
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default me too

    I am with Allen big time on this. I like old classic cartridges anyway.

    Lyman makes a flat point 264 grain #2660449. Mould

    RCBS makes the 37-250FN # 82225. Mould

    The 38-55 in a Highwall Winchester or Ballard single shot rifle can use the much longer (and pointed) 312 grain slugs. That caliber makes a very accurate shooter in a single shot.

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