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Thread: How to shower?

  1. #1
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    Default How to shower?

    Our trailer does not have a shower. My wife would like to bathe every other day or so while camping if possible. I've heard about some small portable units that can heat the water using propane only... has any one ever seen or used these?

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    I just use one of the solar bags, if the sun is'nt out heat the water on your stove and pour it into the bag. They make cheap shower surounds, hang the bag, there you go. They have a clamp that you can shut the water off while you lather yorself up, and then rince away. I think they hold about 5 gallons.

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Another way for a remote shower that works good...get a 12v RV pump some garden hose and and a 5 gallon bucket. put alligator clips on the pump wires and pull your truck up to where the shower is to hook up to. Drop the suction hose in 5 gallon bucket of heated water and go to it. BTW 5 gal is enough water for a short but decent shower and the pump gives you good pressure.

    Sorry, I know that wasnt your question....we just heated the water in a big tea kettle and poured boiling water into the water in the bucket to heat it up.

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    Member power drifter's Avatar
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    Default 12 volt shower

    Years ago I lived over 14 years without power. With out power water doesn't run very well. When I finally got a well put in it wasn't the clear alaska water you think of. It had lots of iron in it.
    My wife and I used those solar shower bags but she got tired of it and wanted more. So we had a big 18 gal muck bucket filled it with water and some boiling hot to make it just right. The heat made the iron drop to the bottom. Floating on the top I had 2in blue foam in that I cut a hole and mounted a 12 volt boat sump pump. Well that wants to pump like 900 gals a hr so at that rate it would be a short one. I added a valve and opened it up to let it flush back into the bucket so the rate was very nice and long and we could both have a great shower in the sauna and without the iron as we would stop pumping when the level got low. Drawing only the clean water off the top. This really works great and in some ways I miss those days. Andrew

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    At camp we used a 5 gallon bucket, nailed the handle to a tree so bottom is at shower head height. then drilled a hole in side of bucket near the bottom and fasten a water spicket to the bucket. Then you can buy a cheap shower head that threads on the spicket.

  7. #7

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    Find a 5 gallon gas can new if you can get one. Break off the chain on the lid drill a hole to put a hose bib and a hose barb(barb goes inside) put enough hose on barb to reach close to the bottom.

    Drill a hole just outside of the cap for a Mag wheel air stem.

    Fill with water place by fire until warm, attach hose to hose bib and use a tire pump to give you pressure.

    If you use a bike/foot pump you can take it with you anywhere and have a great shower.

  8. #8
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    The shower you are talking about works great they sell them at sportsmans wherehouse. they burn on propane. it works just like a hot water on demand system You can fill a five gallon bucket with water start up the unit and it has a pump that you put in the bucket it runs on d cell batterys it pumps water thue the coils and heats it gose thue the coils then its pumped up to your shower head. It dose a good job... If the water you are useing is real cold they recomend that you run it thrue the unit back into the bucket and then take your shower.

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    Default

    The otherthing is they make a great little shower tent. They carry them at sportsmans wherehouse.

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    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    Default

    Before we had water at our property, we had one of those little propane heater showers and they worked terrible. I wouldn't suggest it. I know that it's better than nothing, but holding the 5 gallon bucket to be able to suck in enough pressure for the water to take a shower... ugh. No water pressure. It stinks.

    Although I hate to admit this and this is coming from another woman, okay... tell your wife the best thing that she can do is use wipes to wipe off her body, braid her hair, put it in a bun or a hat, wash her face, brush her teeth, and just rough it. Camping isn't camping if she has to have a shower.

    Trust me. I get what she's saying. There are just some things that women need to have done. I am sure that's she's not high maint. She is probably like me and prefers good hygiene. It's important to her.. I completely get that, but what I also get is whether or not it's reasonable to have a shower while out and about in the wilderness.

    Maybe as a suggestion, you can find somewhere that has a hot springs that would make her feel a little better getting into some kind of water. Do you think that would suffice rather than carrying and lugging around an extra propane tank (even if they are the smaller ones... they are still heavy) as well as a bulky shower set?
    Lurker.

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    Talking Shower...

    Pulling this off in Alaska would be tuff, but I like the above mentioned 5 gallon bucket,with a custom hose and a push button shower head like we have in the vacation trailer.The tuff part in Alaska would be finding a branch to shove a rope over and hoist up the full 5 gallon bucket,then tie it off.I remember all the articles I read about putting your food up in a tree when hunting in Alaska, and the first time I stood at the base of a spruce thinking...how do they do that.lol So on that note,as Co mentioned...best to use baby wipes for a few days and can always heat enough water to wash your hair.

  12. #12
    Member SuYentna Dave's Avatar
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    Default ATV Sprayer

    What I did at my place was get a 16 gal sprayer that fits on a ATV, ( I got my from Cabela's).

    I heat my water on the stove and pour in the water. It is fairly easy to pour due to the oversize lid on the tank. I changed the spray nozzle to one that has an off switch and since the 12v pump has a pressure switch it sprays when you open the valve and stops when you close it. I have use this system for 6 years now with out problems. I had apx. $150 in to it when all done.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...039&hasJS=true

  13. #13
    Member Michael's Avatar
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    Default

    We started out using a Mil surplus portable eyewash station. Fill it with water, pump it up and away you go. To go lighter we started using a garden sprayer like you would use for insecticides or herbicides. Again, fill it up, pump to pressure and your good to go. It is also handy to have near the campfire for that errant spark and to put your fire out before retiring for the evening.

    On the plus side, someone has to hold the nozzle and the bar of soap.

  14. #14

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    Hygiene is important, but one can get by with a spit bath using a pot of hot water and a wash cloth, followed by a brisk rub down with a good towel on a daily basis.

    I worked on a boat as a kid, hardly any water, we used wintergreen rubbing alcohol and a wash cloth daily. On my desert excursions, we used a qt water bottle and a wash cloth. The youngsters were complaining about the lack of baby wipes, I had to give them some OJT about the wash cloth and water bottle, male and female alike.

    I was hunting the Sheenjek River basin and ran intoa guy that just got in the river every day with a wash cloth. That is dedicated!

    The good thing about all that is that I really enjoyed the long hot shower when I finally got one!

    Thanks!

  15. #15

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    Gee, I am so wondering how the old timers figured out how to keep clean?
    the rest of my thoughts I will keep to myself. I am amazed that I have lived to be my age with out asking all of this internet help ROFLMAO

  16. #16
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    Default along the same line

    as the sprayer, but different. They sell different ones but this is the one I found quickly.


    abouthttp://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200314138_200314138


    Fill with warm water, after mounting at height desired. After pumping tie the trigger down and enjoy.

  17. #17
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    Default

    I 2nd SusitnaAK's recommendation.

    I purchased one of these Zodi X-40 units ( purchased at Sportsmans Warehouse ) for our cabin at Lake Louise, after the women ( wife and daughter ) were insisting I make better use of the shower enclosure that prior owners had installed in our Cabin.
    The prior owners had used a standing reseviour type of set up that others have recommended here, which I found rather limiting. I like this unit because all I need is a 12V deep cycle battery and a 20# ( 5 gal ) propane cylinder to operate. ( Along with water, of course ).

    This propane unit works very well, almost too well , at heating water. I chose this one over the much-less expensive ones that use the small LP gas canisters, as I wanted something more stable with a larger footprint.

    I place the unit outside the cabin by the shower room, so it vents outdoors naturally, and I can asure there is sufficient clearance to combustibles. I pump water from the lake up into a 30 gal storage tank outside the cabin wall, by the heater. I insert the intake hose/pump assy into the 30gal storage tank, fire the unit off, and presto- instant hot shower.

    I ran the discharge/ hot water supply hose from the unit thru the wall and used the shower head provided with the unit in the shower where a standard shower head would mount. I installed the hoses thru holes drilled in the wall, sealed the gaps, and leave the hose permanently installed there- coiled up ouside with end caps when not in use. I cut the provided hoses, and utilize barbed union push-on connector fittings , so that I can easily connect/disconnect the unit and store it away when not in use. As I stated above, the hoses to the inside stay connected to the shower and stub-out to just outside the wall. The rest of the hose assy stays connected to the Zodi unit. The push-on barb connectors make for easy reconnection and hookup. Worm-drive hose clamps keep the connections from leaking. It all disassembles in less than a minute.

    The idea was to pump water from the lake, allow it to come up to ambient temperature in my storage tank, then use the heater to heat it & pump it up to the shower. The unit works so well its actually difficult to set the temp thermostat low enough to keep the water from becoming too hot.
    Cold lake water actually works best, as it allows me to set the t-stat setting more in the mid-level position. I eventually ended up hooking up a 12V transfer pump, which provides more pressure and moves the water thru the heating coils faster, and thus reduces the heat transfer, which allows me to set the temp adjust knob at a postion more in the mid-range again.

    We all love it-- it works great. I'm not concerned with conserving water, so going with a tank larger than 5-gal assures me I won't run the thing dry before turning off the gas to the burner. If you run these with no water going thru them, you will melt the heating coils and wreck the unit.

  18. #18
    Member atvalaska's Avatar
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    Default coleman

    coleman makes a water heat with a hose... i use it all the time ...cooking bbq any where ,a shower at the cabin
    WHEN IN DOUBT> THROTTLE OUT.......

  19. #19
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    Default Portable Shower Trailers

    I've found that the demand for fresh water and hygiene solutions for remote work sites in Alaska is rather high....people can only handle so much ruggedness....check out these portable shower trailers... I've called around...AK has hardly any of em...

  20. #20
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    Default

    We've evolved over the years from melting snow in winter and a sand point/pitcher pump in summer to having a year-round well with a submersible pump, but we never installed the water system into the cabin. Instead, we take water from the wellhead and heat a large pot of water on the wood stove or cook stove and transfer it into a small holding tank above the shower. The transfer pump is cheap and simple from AIH and the tank is a small fish/utility tote also from AIH. I fitted a flange to the bottom of the holding tank and a ball valve to that, then a standard shower nozzle. After we pump warm water up we take conventional showers through the shower head via gravity. Two adults and a teenager can easily take a conservative but comfortable shower with less than 5 gallons. We use a standard shower stall and drain the gray water onto the ground with no problems. It's worked so well I never hooked up the storage tank and Paloma water heater that I've had for many years. Simple is hard to beat.

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