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Thread: Water between tube and innertube

  1. #1
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    Default Water between tube and innertube

    I had some water sneak in (though the zipper) and form ice inside my cat tubes this winter- is it vital to get all moisture out? Seems like it will sneak in during regular use anyway. Other than a potential for a mold/mildew- can any damage occur to either the PVC outer or urethane inner?

  2. #2
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default No Worries

    Quote Originally Posted by Porterwagner View Post
    I had some water sneak in (though the zipper) and form ice inside my cat tubes this winter- is it vital to get all moisture out? Seems like it will sneak in during regular use anyway. Other than a potential for a mold/mildew- can any damage occur to either the PVC outer or urethane inner?
    Porter,

    The only real concern with this is handling / moving the tubes with ice inside, as the sharp edges of the ice could lacerate your inner bladder or the tubes themselves. It is unlikely that this will happen though, because the ice has formed in creases where the bladder does not totally fill the void between itself and the shell. It becomes an issue if you deflate and roll the tubes.

    Generally I would not worry about it.

    As a regular maintenance practice it's a good idea to open the tubes at least once a year, just to ensure the zipper still works if nothing else. There are reports of folks being unable to operate the zipper, which becomes clogged with glacial silt and other material over time.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  3. #3
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    Default

    Thanks Mike, that advice is what I figured. As this is my first raft and others I've known were very cautious of drying out their boats after use I thought it prudent to check.

  4. #4
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default damage

    I have not observed mold/mildew, or damage, due to water within the outer tube of an AIRE raft. I only open up the zippers every 3 or 4 years, during the winter, if I think about it. Again, I have not saw any mold/mildew or damage. In the winter my three boats are deflated on the trailer and in the garage. But I see rafts all over Anchorage that are left inflated on trailers all winter and all year long, outside and exposed to the elements.

    When repairing bear bites in the field, it generally takes several minutes and a pair of fishing pliars to unzip the zipper. Then it takes seconds or a minute to repair the tooth holes. AIRS rafts fix easy, usually.

    Dennis
    AK TAGS

  5. #5
    Member BlueMoose's Avatar
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    Default Smell / Mold / Mildew

    Every once in a while an older model of cataraft will come into the shop fior repair that has water between the Bladder and the Tube and yes they do have slime, mold build up and yes it does smell however I have never notice damage in any way shape or form and it cleans up with ease. We wipe them dry and treat them with 303 zip them back up after the repair and they are GTG.

    As Mike stated it is a none issue concerning damage IMO.

    Blue Moose

  6. #6
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    Default this should be of titanic consideration....

    Most boat owners recognize that when we maintain our equipment the best we can... the better it will likely work as well as a probable extend life and possibly a reduced amount of servicing.

    Leaving your inflatable raft outside all the time in Alaska is never the best option, nevertheless some people do not have or consider an alternative for doesn't matter what the reason.

    So if the boat stays outside all the time… anticipate your investment loosing its “newness” (if you will) much sooner with both dependability and fix-ability being compromised at a much greater pace.

    With AIRE you get the 10 YEAR NO FAULT!!! So this should be of titanic consideration for those knowing ahead of time that they will stockpile their rafts outdoors in Alaska throughout the calendar year. Let’s face it tho’ an AIRE properly maintained should go well more than 20 years without a hickup!!!!!

    As others stated the icing build-up in between your outer skin and inner bladder is not such a big deal.

    The worst thing however you can do is move around and fold up an AIRE when temps dip well below freezing… in this case let ‘em be and treat ‘em super easy in these conditions. You can crack the outer fabric and pinch bladders.

    Dealing with mold & mildew is not of big concern to the urethane bladders… but it can be to the outer skin, base fabrics, and zipper fabrications. Clean up, Remediation, and Drying is a good practice.

    The best things to do now prior to season start-up:

    1.) Make sure to remove condensation build-up from inside the bladders
    (sometimes quite a bit of water!)

    2.) Inflate the raft evenly (all chambers)
    A. Soap check all your valves... look for bubbling that shows leaking
    B. Clean-up and soap check boat... look for bubbling that shows leaking... eyes & ears!
    C. Inspect zippers, stitching, and hardware
    (clean zippers with low pressure power-washer and use alpine ski-wax or leave soap-film on zippers)

    3.) Check and update your repair kit… (some stuff in there has a shelf life or should not be left out all year in the cold)
    4.) Finally go over the rest of your gear and make sure it’s all in good working condition.


    On a side note: I'd make every effort to deal with any volcanic ash in the zippers by cleaning and waxing ‘em up in addition to scrubbing between the rowing frame and boat fabric … that kinda stuff can make for a lot longer repair time if ever needed.

    Enjoy a great summer, & if at all feasible… endeavor to store stuff inside after the season.

  7. #7

    Default zipper

    ZIPPERS -- BLADDERS??? Why so many moving parts? Just look around and find a strong boat and stop
    your worries?? Good rafts just dont break much any more.
    SAFE BOATING!!!

  8. #8
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goeaux View Post
    ZIPPERS -- BLADDERS??? Why so many moving parts? Just look around and find a strong boat and stop
    your worries?? Good rafts just dont break much any more.
    SAFE BOATING!!!
    Who let that Cajun in here agin? Last time we heard from you, you were supposed to post a picture of that fat little round boat of yours... well?

    :-D

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  9. #9

    Default photos

    Thanks for reminding me bro- I really am down in Louisiana visiting my folks- just stiring the gumbo a bit on my post-talk later
    Goo

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