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Thread: Tying them down...

  1. #1
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Default Tying them down...

    I have seen a LOT of different ways people tie their rigs to the trailers and have heard a LOT of different reasons why (some are better than others ). Lets put up some pics and pointers on securing ATVs for trailering.

    I have found that tying ratchet straps to the undercarriage or axles seem to be the most secure for me. I have had a few straps come loose when I strapped them to the racks due to the suspension flexing on the machine bouncing over frost heaves and bumps. If you tie directly to the frame or axle of the machine, there is no bounce.

    Any other pointers?
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    Left tire tie down to right of center, right tire tie down to left of center. Does that make sence?

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    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKmud View Post
    I have seen a LOT of different ways people tie their rigs to the trailers and have heard a LOT of different reasons why (some are better than others ).
    You're not talking about somone I know are you ..

    On a two-place tilt trailer, we got two big eye-bolts to thread into where the ski-bars would thread into. We winch the fronts of both bikes down on the bolts and then a strap around each ball on the rear to the trailer.

    Definitely go with straps for each wheeler. If a strap breaks (yeah, its happened to us), you might only lose one instead of both...

    Oh, BTW, parking brake on and in gear also....

  4. #4

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    I've only seen one atv fall off the front of a trailer, the rest have fallen off the rear. What I do is first pull out my winch cable and secure it to the front of the trailer and take up the slack, but don't crank it down. I use that more as a safety strap than anything. Then a rachet strap securing the front and a strap securing the rear. I put the rachet straps as low on the frame as possible and crank them puppies down.

    The key is quality straps. I bought two straps from AIH that are 3" wide and 6' long. Perfect for straping down an atv.

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    Member IceColdak's Avatar
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    I use ratchet straps for both my ATV's they each get 4 of them

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    Member akjw7's Avatar
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    I just rebuilt a warn A2000 and when I ordered the parts the guy told me they sell a ton of the plastic end housing gears (the piece with the freespool/engaged lever) and shock loads on the winch is the reason. He said not to use it as a tie down or tow strap because the jerk that happens is what strips that weak point. (by design i think)

    anyone use the wheel type basket straps? those guard dog things look pretty trick but not quite as flexible or cheap as straps!

    One other thing and as kind of an aside - why do people make trailers with completely boxed steel frames without adding something that you can hook a strap hook around??? Drives me nuts to have to punch holes in a trailer and put big eye bolts or something in just to be able to strap down.

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  8. #8

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    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I just rebuilt a warn A2000 and when I ordered the parts the guy told me they sell a ton of the plastic end housing gears (the piece with the freespool/engaged lever) and shock loads on the winch is the reason. He said not to use it as a tie down or tow strap because the jerk that happens is what strips that weak point. (by design i think)
    I would agree with ya there. I put no more pressure on the winch cable when I snap it to the trailer than as if it was pulled up to the fairlead. I anchor my atv with the straps pretty dang good, to the point it hardly moves. The winch cable just gives me a bit more piece of mind.

  9. #9
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akjw7 View Post
    I just rebuilt a warn A2000 and when I ordered the parts the guy told me they sell a ton of the plastic end housing gears (the piece with the freespool/engaged lever) and shock loads on the winch is the reason. He said not to use it as a tie down or tow strap because the jerk that happens is what strips that weak point. (by design i think)
    Thanks for the heads up....

  10. #10
    Member akjw7's Avatar
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    it was news to me too - I'd guess you're ok if you do it like gremlin said and just don't get it tight and having something else (strap) that is tighter than the winch cable - if a strap breaks and it does jerk on the winch who cares if you have to replace a $100 of winch parts (it wasn't even that much - I needed a couple other things for mine) or buy a new winch for that matter...still much better than watching your wheeler do cartwheels down the highway!

    Also I really don't know if all atv winches are built this way...this was a warn specific place telling me this - montanna jacks - by the way if you ever need winch parts they were absolutely top notch - very knowledgeable, quick shipping, and they were happy to take the box to the post office for me instead of the typical "we only ship UPS" load that we always get. Thumbs up.

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    The tire bonnets and/or wheel chocks I've seen look slick and fast. Cabela's sells a bracket that allows a tongue to engage the trailer ball (don't remember the brand), but I'm not sure it is ideal- seems like if you had a sideways slide it would torque the bracket pretty fierce. And if you need to use straps in addition to the bracket- then it seems redundant (not bad I guess$$$). Which brand of ATV will survive being ejected in a crash best? Most I see aren't tied down at all (in the back of p/u's).

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    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    I am a tiedown super freak! I put a minimum of 4 per ATV and then usually 2 more per ATV pulling towards each other, and one more that hooks thru the rear racks of both ATV's and ties into the back of the trailer...... excessive I know, but it only takes a few extra minutes.

    My biggest fear is not loosing an ATV, but killing some poor ******* behind me on a motorcycle by loosing an ATV. I could get over wrecking a $9000 machine, but I would hate to live life knowing I killed or hurt somebody because I was in too big of a hury to properly secure my stuff.

    So..... now that you know that, you will be able to identify my rig with ease! 2 ATV's and a quartermillion straps!
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

  13. #13

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    I got pulled over by the police who were checking for booze and for stolen Atv. I passed both but the cop gives me crap for the way I had my Atv strapped down. He made me get out of the truck, so he could show me what he said was the proper way to strap down an Atv (the way the cops do it).

    I was using 4 straps and as far as I was concerned they were secured and had not moved for 300 miles.

    He said that the proper way to secure them was to have a person (me) sit on the Atv and using my weight bounce hard down to compress the shocks, while he pulled the straps tight.

    I must admit that the ATV was really really solid but there was one problem, in that unless your buddy is there to help you off load (compress the shocks), there is no way on gods little green earth that I was going to release those straps myself, without cutting them

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alangaq View Post
    I am a tiedown super freak! I put a minimum of 4 per ATV and then usually 2 more per ATV pulling towards each other, and one more that hooks thru the rear racks of both ATV's and ties into the back of the trailer...... excessive I know, but it only takes a few extra minutes.

    My biggest fear is not loosing an ATV, but killing some poor ******* behind me on a motorcycle by loosing an ATV. I could get over wrecking a $9000 machine, but I would hate to live life knowing I killed or hurt somebody because I was in too big of a hury to properly secure my stuff.

    So..... now that you know that, you will be able to identify my rig with ease! 2 ATV's and a quartermillion straps!
    I use lots of straps also. My buddies rib me for it. But then again they have "lost" ATV's and sleds out of the back of P/U's. A Honda they lost out of a pickup had its rear axle bent.

  15. #15

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    I installed 4 D-rings on my trailer and will be putting 2 more on this summer. I haven't had any issues with straps coming off the rack bars since I did this.

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    I had a rack stay weld pop last season under moderate load. I assume it might have been defective, as its a 2003 utility that hasn't seen much outdoor storage. All the same it makes me wonder how reliable the racks are for extreme service (e.g. trailering w/straps)

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    With ATV suspension bounce, straps momentarily loose their tension, allowing tie-down straps to come unhooked. One solution to this problem is to replace your hooks with shackles or mountain-climbing carabiners--which will remain in place whether the strap is tight or not.

  18. #18
    Member E-K-C's Avatar
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    Default Tie downs

    I have a ring welded to front of machine and on front of trailer--quality strap and for back 2 straps in a X pattern from the frame --to eye bolts that go through my trailer on plates.......
    I have used winch and it will come loose or move in this method at some given time.
    E-K-C ----------------ERIC

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