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Thread: tree stand which style

  1. #1
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    Default tree stand which style

    which style of tree stand work best a hang or a self climber
    Last edited by Daveinthebush; 04-22-2009 at 23:31.

  2. #2
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Default ?

    For what? I own both and have used both extensively. They both have advantages and disadvantages. It depends on a lot of factors and we know none of them. Please elaborate.

    Brett

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    Default sorry

    well its going to be used for bear baiting. the types of trees are birch and spurce. the climbing stand would work fine on the birch and would work on some spruce dependend on amount of limbs. the hang on would do it all be but would have to carey the climbing steps. this is what i see but i dont realy know anything about tree stands.
    thanks

  4. #4
    Member BearSlayer's Avatar
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    Default Stand

    I would use a hang on stand with screw in steps. Going up and down with a climber would get old. I like to be able to just climb up to my stands. Since you are new to stands. Make sure you get enough steps that you can step on to your stand and not be hanging like a monkey off of some branches. Good luck.

  5. #5

    Default Hanger

    I would pass on the self climber. Not to many trees that are just limbless poles out in the woods. Plus I like a bit of cover that a spruce offers. Big boars don't get big by being stupid. You might be amazed at just how often they do pick you out. Some sense a threat & bolt, while others may just keep stuffen there face. The other thing is climbers are all nice & padded: seat, rails, etc. If you put it out "they" will come & tear the crap out of it. That is unless you plan on hauling it out every night. I just run hangers on my baits. They are not as comfy but it is nice having it all set up n ready so all I do is climb up, put down my butt pad, hook in, & wait for the show to start. I never leave my seat pad when I leave. I just have a few so each site has one. If for some reason we need two on one spot we pull one off a less productive bait.

    If you go with a hanger a foot rail is a nice feature. That way you can shift your legs from time to time while you wait. I also think they are cheaper. If you are a bit older the nice "Lazy Boy Climber" is way nice though? Good luck w/ your choice.

  6. #6
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Lots of variables

    There are lots of variables in tree stand selection. I have climbers, light weight strap-on, heavy chain-on, permanent, and double ladder stands.

    The lightweight goes for scouting distant areas and weighs about 11 pounds. The chain on is heavy at 22 and is for when I find a spot that demands comfort and does not need to be moved all season. The ladder comes in handy when the trees can not hold any other type and I can even pull several small tres together to support it.

    Much of your choice is going to be dependent upon the trees in the area. If spruce I would opt for a chain on. Many of the climbers may not fit around the spruce we have around PWS. Up in Unit 13 where the trees are smaller I would rather have the ladder stand. Like I stated - it depends on the trees. You might consider owning all three. Before I came up here I had about 12 - 15 stands of various types at certain times.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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  7. #7
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Default

    Fixed postitions are the most versitile for almost any tree size, shape, or type. I HATE HATE to put them up. A good way to fall and get hurt if you ask me. They aren't that much fun to take down either, but not as bad as putting them up. Just put the fixed stand up from the prevailing wind from the bait. They reduce noise because you don't have to go up or down the tree with the stand every time. If you get one buy one with a good seat and hand rails. A hanging seat is preferable to a fixed seat for comfort and definitely when bow hunting as it can be pushed back to accomadate more room for standing. The hand rails are for comfort, but more importantly for safety to have a barier on the sides of you (if you fall asleep and lean to the side). The platform is usually jointed to the main part. This can rust and squeek over time. Keep it lubed. If bow hunting I would not recommend a shooting rail. It gets in the way. The hand rails can get in the way too, but it's easy to work arround them. I've shot a number of deer with my bow over the hand rail. One literally bellow the side of my stand. When gun hunting the hand rail is up to you. If you where expecting longer shots it would be good. On short shots over a bait it wouldn't be necessary. It would be helpful to have to rest the gun on while waiting for the bear, so the gun is up and pointing in the general direction to minimize movement necesary to shoot. There are many models to choose from. Look for a sturdy model with the features you want.

    Climbers are easier to relocate if necesary. Not as much of an issue if you are on a bait. Wind is right hunt it. Wind isn't right don't. I think they are safer to use. They do require some physical strength to use, but some models of stands and different climbing techniques can minimize strength needed. (Then again hanging off the side of a tree with one hand or no hands at the same time you are using one hand or both hands to hang a fixed stand requires strength too and balls I might add.) The same applies to hand rails and the shooting rail. A decent sized platform is nice period for any stand type and especially when bow hunting. If you carry them in and out every time it makes noise when the metal hits twigs and such. Some models can be assembled into back packs for easy carrying. You can leave them at the base of the tree, but that leaves scent and allows a bear a possible chew toy if wanted. Another option is to stash it along the trail on the way in close to the stand, but not in the imediate area. Look for a climber with a flexible cord or bike chain type rap around the tree. The metal v type is noisy. It acts as an amplifier for sound and is not ideal. the flexible type rap around should be coated with a rubber gaurd to minimize noise. API grand slam is a nice climbing stand. Certainly not the only one though.

    Ladder stands might be another option to consider. They have the benefits of a fixed possition without the danger associated with putting up and taking down a fixed position stand. Warning: Bears have been known to climb ladder stands from time to time even when hunter occupied! Then again they've been know to climb trees with hunters ocupying the same tree in a fixed position or climber. They aren't as easy to relocate as a climber, but more so than a fixed postion. They are bulkier and more awkward to carry in.

    Thoughts on stand placement. Sun in your eyes sucks. Bears are likely to come when the sun is low, so having it at your back makes it harder for game to see you and doesn't blind you when you look at the bait. Of course that's assuming you are hunting a place open enough to see the sun. Put the stand in a tree with cover arround it to bread up your outline. A tree with a wide trunk removes your outline when viewed straight on. Extra cover from branches on the same tree in front of you and behind you can help to bread up your outline especially when viewed from the side. Being just under a pine tree canopy can help even if the trunk is bear. Don't go crazy trimming up the bait area. Create shooting lanes. This minimizes disturbance to the area and keeps some cover between you and the bear the break up your outline, but know your shooting lanes because they seem to multiply as the sun sets and twigs get harder to see.

    Be sure to buy a safety harness, learn how to use it (ie. practice ahead), take it with you, and then ALWAYS use it! 1 of 4 tree stand hunters fall out of there stand at some point. I know people who have and have been seriously injured. Nothing to take a chance on. Many stands come with safety systems. I like the vests the best. I forget who makes them.

    If you have questions feel free to PM or call.

    Brett

    330-429-2762

    PS I grew up hunting whitetails so this may be way more in depth than is necessary for baiting black bears, but being meticulous can't hurt.

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