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Thread: The biggest brown bears?

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    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    Question The biggest brown bears?

    Where do the biggest brown bears come from in terms of skull and hide size?Is it Kodiak island or the Alaska peninsula?.I know there are different opinions on this subject
    What do you think?


    Good hunting

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    i'll go out on a limb here...
    big hides come from the ak peninsula, more common there anyway. dont' get me wrong they are not running everywhere, but you hear about more 11 footers being taken down that way, earlier season and just as many fish.
    Kodiak seems to have the ak pen on the skull size though, big bears have big heads, pretty straight forward, but i've taken nine plus bears off kodiak that were nearly 28" and i've seen 10 footers off the ak pen that were barely 27", same goes in most situations i'd guess though.
    Gotta remember that the peninsula has alot more bears harvested than kodiak too...kodiaks only around 150-180 bears per year, thats for a spring and fall season.
    Big bears are like everything else, they are where you find, them,you'll get big skulls off the mainland as well. some dude in port moller shot on in 1954 that was 14 foot with i think a 33" skull...never entered it.
    i like the pen in the fall and kodiak in the spring...if i was to hunt them.

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    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    14 ft hide!,33 inch skull! omg that bear must have been so huge...:O

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    Largest three bears I ever seen were on Unimak Island. We did not get any of the three. Settled for the 10' variety.

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    Wink very large bears

    Quote Originally Posted by Akres View Post
    Largest three bears I ever seen were on Unimak Island.

    akres;
    can you tell us about the 3 that got away?

    thanks.

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    World Record Brown Bear.


    SCORE: 30 12/16 LOCATION: Kodiak Island, AK HUNTER: Roy Lindsley OWNER: Los Angeles Co. Mus. DATE: 1952 KEY MEASUREMENTS:
    Greatest length of skull without lower jaw: 17 15/16
    Greatest width of skull: 12 13/16


    I have the last edition of the Alaska Big Game Recoeds that used to be printed by The Alaska Big Game Records Club that was published in 1971. About 70% of the Brown Bears listed were taken on Kodiak. There was a total of 94 bears listed up to the last publishing of this book.

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    Default Big Bears

    Quote Originally Posted by cold zero View Post
    akres;
    can you tell us about the 3 that got away?

    thanks.
    Oh yeh! It was an October hunt, and no doubt that helped atribute to their size, lots of fat. We were hunting Urilia Bay, on the north shore of the Island. Salmon were still coming into the creeks and there were lots of feed on the beaches. Two whales, seals etc. Weather dictated the hunt. Just as we had the really big bears figured out, a monster storm hit us. It lasted about 8 days. The big bears vanished. All three were an honest 11'. Finally settled on a 10'2" boar and a 9'11' boar. Lots of wolves and foxes as well as caribou on the island. The big bears went up into the volcanoes when the storm hit. We did not try to hunt up there, as it was just to far to reasonably expect to carry them out. Anyone wanting a remote hunt, with a good chance of getting a good bear, should consider Unimak.

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    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    Wow to see 3 11 ft bears at the same time must be very rare,i bet it was exciting!

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlleninAlaska View Post
    World Record Brown Bear.


    SCORE: 30 12/16 LOCATION: Kodiak Island, AK HUNTER: Roy Lindsley OWNER: Los Angeles Co. Mus. DATE: 1952 KEY MEASUREMENTS:
    Greatest length of skull without lower jaw: 17 15/16
    Greatest width of skull: 12 13/16


    I have the last edition of the Alaska Big Game Recoeds that used to be printed by The Alaska Big Game Records Club that was published in 1971. About 70% of the Brown Bears listed were taken on Kodiak. There was a total of 94 bears listed up to the last publishing of this book.
    This might be a pic of the bear Allen is talking about, although this one is from 1948 supposedly.



    MM

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    in the book "some Bears Kill" by kanuit or however you spell it. there is a pic of the bear that squared almost 14 foot and has some other measurments with it, if anyone has that book, would be cool to get the stats on here for comparision..?

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    Wow that cold bay bear is huge!Thank you so much for sharing this info

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    Default Urilia Bay

    I've spent quite a bit of time there. Setnetting off the beach for 3 summers. Quite a place. Lots of bears, wolves, foxes and caribou.

    And some of the worst weather possible. And that was in the summer. I can only imagine what it was like in Oct. During one storm we saw a huge waterspout, as large as any tornado.

    Lots of cool experiences there.

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    This is the world record brown bear taken by Roy Lindsley in 1952 on Kodiak island...
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Quote Originally Posted by martyv View Post
    I've spent quite a bit of time there. Setnetting off the beach for 3 summers. Quite a place. Lots of bears, wolves, foxes and caribou.

    And some of the worst weather possible. And that was in the summer. I can only imagine what it was like in Oct. During one storm we saw a huge waterspout, as large as any tornado.

    Lots of cool experiences there.
    I used to set net there as well (out of Sand Pt.), and I agree, one of THE neatest spots in SW AK. I remember watching Buck (From False Pass, forget his boats name then -Lucky Dove-? or some such) and his deckhand trying to pick a beach set that was 1/2 dry at low tide...heheh..Bears on the beach end and a BIG old sea lion on the wet end...The ran out of seal bombs and flares real quick...

    TONS of bears on that beach when the sockeye run into the lagoon...And some REAL bruisers mixed in amongst 'em....Never did like riding out storms in there tho'....got caught in some real nasty stuff back in '92 in there...no real decent anchorage with an onshore wind/swell....sucked...

    Also a fair run of steelhead in that delta if yer willing to dance with the bears for a few casts.....
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

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    I have a buddy thats on Kodiak right now hunting browns. He has been doing sat phone updates every day and he has seen like 10 bears, none bigger than 8 ft so he is still looking for a biggin.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaCub View Post
    I have a buddy thats on Kodiak right now hunting browns. He has been doing sat phone updates every day and he has seen like 10 bears, none bigger than 8 ft so he is still looking for a biggin.
    Well you have to look to find the big ones,so keep on looking!

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    This is an interesting topic...

    I live year-around in Brown/Grizzly Bear country, guide & outfit Bear hunts every year Spring & Fall, and have been around MANY Bears immediate after the kill, after the intial field-skinning of the hide, and final fleshing of the hide. I have personally ground checked MANY Bears, and have measured their hide after different time periods after the kill at different stages of the fleshing process, and with different amounts of pressure (stretching) applied to the hide.

    An issue that I see more and more is folks stretching, or exagrating, the hide size. You can relate this to a "fish story".

    In general I don't have any problems with these "fish stories" (or bear stretching) and accept them as part of hunting & fishing.
    You know the scenerio,.... a bunch of guys standing around talking, shooting the bull, cutting-up and having a good time....fun loving & joking. By the time that Bear gets back to the lower-48, and the story of the hunt, its going to 12 feet and was charging the guide when the client shot it to save the guides life! A good "story" to be told....that only gets better with time.

    Where I take issue with the entire notion of Bear stretching is that it seems that these "stories", pictures, exagrating claims, magizine articles, and some guide/outfitters are educating common hunters to think that if they come to Alaska for a Brown/Grizzly Bear hunt and don't harvest a 10 foot Bear they have taken a small one. This is non-sence!
    Educating folks to believe that they need to harvest a 10 foot Bear, other wise its not a "trophy" is un-realist and sets the stage for disapointment. I see picutres on websites, magazines, and promotions material that shows picutres of 10 foot Bears that look a LOT like an 8+ foot Bear to me.

    If every Bear hunter already knew & understood the "fish story" mentality of Bear stretching, and accepted it for what it really is, there would be no problems. However most Brown/Grizzly Bear hunters only harvest one in thier lifetime, so most don't have a lot of Bear hunting, or Bear size judging, experince prior to the hunt.

    Kindly keep in mind that the recording clubs only measure the skull for this very reason. Measuring the skull can be duplicated at any time, by anyone qualified, using the same method, and the net result will be the same size skull. Skulls measured 60 days after the date of kill, or 10 years later will rarley have a difference of more than about 1, 2, 3, or 4 (1/16 ths") of an inch.

    Different people measure hide sizes differently. Plus is interesting to note that you'll get a substaniel different measurment of the hide at different times.
    For example if you measure a "green" (fresh) Bear hide right after you get done fleshing it, presumably in the field at camp, maybe measuring by the guide; you will get the largest measurment ever. Measure that same hide a couple of days later, after it has been salted, and it will be smaller. Then measure it again after the taxidermy work is done and it will be smaller yet again. I'm not talking about an inch or two, I've seen a couple of feet difference; espesially if the first time the hide was measured it was pulled on, strecthed, to the maximum tape measure reading.

    Bottom line, at the end of the day, Alaska Brown/Grizzly Bears are awsome animals that deserve great respect. In my opinion, regardless of what the tape measure reads on the hide size they are all nice trophies!

  18. #18
    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    I could not agree more Byron,at the end of the day is not about the skull or hide size its about the experience in the field and the memories...

    Good hunting

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