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Thread: Most Important piece of equipment.

  1. #1

    Default Most Important piece of equipment.

    Fly rods

    Fly fishing Reels

    Flyfishing Lines

    Other

  2. #2
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    I think I would like a fly on the end of the tippet.

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    Member bigcox's Avatar
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    I would have to agree and say the fly, fish do not know what kind of rod or reel you are using.

    Fish On!
    You know your not catching any fish when you start talking about the weather...


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    1) Confidence
    2) Leader/Tippet that's good. Doesn't matter if you have all the awesome flies int he world if every hit you get breaks off
    3) The right fly or flies


    I've caught some of my biggest trout on a shakespeare $30 walmart rod/reel setup. I admit my Sage casts like a dream, still shows me the rod and reel does not matter much.

  5. #5

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    Other:

    I'd say the person fishing on the other end of the pole. I'm not bragging when I say I can catch fish in my favorite waters with crap for equipment. Okay, so maybe I'm bragging a little.

    Actually the right fly is pretty important. Plus I don't like crappy equipment, the good stuff just makes it a more of a pleasure.

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    I feel the fly is important....but as I have recently suffered leaky waders (cloudveils....and BOTH feet) for about two months of steelhead season (brrrr) I think good wading equipment and proper boots....cuz if I'm uncomfortable...I will not fish well.

    But great question....I'll think more on it.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Hey catch it send your waders back to cloudveil they will replace them for free.

    If I had to pick one piece of equipment I couldn't live without considering I had terminal tackle I would pick some sort of fly drying patch, I can't tell you how many flies I've lost trying to dry them in my hat or sweatshirt
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    Hey catch it send your waders back to cloudveil they will replace them for free.

    If I had to pick one piece of equipment I couldn't live without considering I had terminal tackle I would pick some sort of fly drying patch, I can't tell you how many flies I've lost trying to dry them in my hat or sweatshirt
    Really?, I didn't know that....

    But being WITHOUT waders for two months during steelhead season is even worse than being wet IN waders and getting to fish.....They are in the mail.

    But thanks for the tip....so wise....I'd never imagine that a 400 dollar pair of waders would have a warranty. You must think all around you are idiots...(they were in the mail the day the Skagit closed.)

  9. #9
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default rod, reel, line, flies, bourbon,...

    After the obvious stuff

    A pair of high quality polarized glasses and my nail knot tool. I would be lost if I had to fish without either. I take two (or more) of each for this reason on remote float trips.

    Below is a link to the nail knot tool. A child could use it. Just an awesome tool.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...set=ISO-8859-1
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  10. #10
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    Really?, I didn't know that....

    But being WITHOUT waders for two months during steelhead season is even worse than being wet IN waders and getting to fish.....They are in the mail.

    But thanks for the tip....so wise....I'd never imagine that a 400 dollar pair of waders would have a warranty. You must think all around you are idiots...(they were in the mail the day the Skagit closed.)
    I hear you I wore leaky waders all fall and winter, this year I'm investing in some "backup waders" (simms G4s) to suppliment the cloudveil ones that way whenever I have a leak I'll get it fixed right away instead of suffering
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  11. #11
    Member AKducks's Avatar
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    I would say other then your fly ( that is an easy answer) I would say fly line not what brand but whether you have floating sink tip or full sink. my roomate and I were talking the other night how we were fishing this spot where you could not catch fish if you were using a sink tip (I kept hooking bottom) but after fly choice I think line is the next step. (then probably real ( big fish I want a disc drag) ) and lastly rod

  12. #12
    Member garnede's Avatar
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    After a fly it would have to be your head. Use it every once in a while.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  13. #13
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Now that you're all set and think you have everything you need, pick up a copy of the regs and get a fishing license.

  14. #14
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    How bout the toothpick to peg the bead?
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    How bout the toothpick to peg the bead?
    There are many ways to "peg" a bead without toothpicks. Although that is the method I normally use.
    I would say the fly is #1, and confidence would be a close second. Expect to hook up on every cast and drift. If you don't, be surprised. If you "know" you will hook up on every cast, you will be much more "in tune" with what you are doing and will catch MANY more fish. At least that is my story and I'm sticking to it!

  16. #16
    Member liv2fish87's Avatar
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    Default rain gear

    I was on the gulkana this last summer, and it poured on us for four days. some nights i didnt even take my waders and raingear off. I would have been in a world of **** if i didnt have a good rain setup.
    Go Fish

  17. #17
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    Default Hard to say in AK

    I've been thinkin about this for a while....when I started flyfishing in WI, MT and MI...I had starter equipment....the rivers weren't big enough to need a fancy rod, the weather was nice enough that solid raingear/decent waders weren't that important (lots of wetwading in tennis shoes) flies were cheap and easy to buy, and many times (unless during trico and pmd seasons) most anything worked to some extent. Down there, it seemed the only thing I was missing was the INFO about timing, bugs, places, etc.....so perhaps then THAT was the most important piece of equipment (of which I only had a bit of)

    For the last 5 years in Bristol Bay...I have accumulated gobs of top end stuff and I'm not sure I could really live without any of it....I love my fast rods for huckin bunny fur and the infamous bead set ups, I like my box full of 10 different colorations of fleshflies plus as many types of leeches, My simms gore tex stuff will go with me to the grave, and all the patagoochie underlayer stuff is almost as much a necessity as water. Due to the more aggressive nature of the fish, their high densities and their consistency between areas, the info doesn't seem as crucial as it was in more technical fisheries down below, but now it seems that my whole fishing tuxedo (I don't even want to add up what I am worth on the hoof when I step into a river) is sort of like a suit of armor to protect me and keep me comfortable in this potentially unforgiving environment.

    SO, I think I've settled on good, quality, comfy, protective clothing and layers/waders as the most crucial...may not be needed for a July day on the Russian...but when things kick up and get nasty, a box full of flies, a fancy rod, and even the info....doesn't do you much good if you are huddled on the bank in the natal position because you are so uncomfortable.

  18. #18
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default After the obvious...

    +1 on polarized glasses. Nippers maybe. Cutting tippet with a knife is slower and not very specific.

    Hey, AkPM: "... this year I'm investing in some "backup waders" (simms G4s) to suppliment the cloudveil ones that way whenever I have a leak I'll get it fixed right away instead of suffering"

    Simms to backup your Cloudveils, eh? That's product endorsement... deserves a thread of its own, eh? Best wishes this season.

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