Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: future raft puntures

  1. #1
    Member mski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    north pole
    Posts
    63

    Default future raft puntures

    okay let me rephrase that old post. how do you plan on repairing your raft puntures? i have a nrs otter so i am just looking for ideas on what i should have on hand when floating....mark

  2. #2
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak, AK.
    Posts
    1,527

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mski View Post
    okay let me rephrase that old post. how do you plan on repairing your raft puntures? i have a nrs otter so i am just looking for ideas on what i should have on hand when floating....mark
    An Aire raft.

  3. #3

    Default patch kit

    You should buy a NRS patch kit--- or if you just dont want to deal with repairs-- get a urethane SOTAR--

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,449

    Default

    That, or buy a roll of Tear-Aid.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    22

    Default I Second Tear-Aid

    Be sure to pick up the type for hypalon.

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    931

    Thumbs up NRS Otter --- straightforward repair

    Quote Originally Posted by mski View Post
    okay let me rephrase that old post. how do you plan on repairing your raft puntures? i have a nrs otter so i am just looking for ideas on what i should have on hand when floating....mark
    Your NRS Otter is generally a pretty straightforward repair.

    1.) You need an NRS or equivalent Hypalon 'rubber' repair kit.
    The basics being enough proper fabric, recently purchased toluol-based adhesive (possibly w/ accelerate), something to roughen both patch & boat surfaces and toluene solvent as both prep cleaner plus finishing flasher.

    There are other things that go into a comprehensive raft repair kit, however these are the ingredients to make a really good fabric repair on the NRS Otters.

    I would add a little bottle of liquid dish soap to find any leaks!

    I would highly recommend using a sturdy ammo can instead of the little plastic repair kit boxes. Those little boxes are unreliable, easily broken, and will typically leak when submersed to any pressure. The ammo can is also fastened directly to the boat -- not in some little cargo bag that can become separated in a mishap.

    2.) Punctures: (here we are talking pinholes up to 2" holes)
    Pretty much the same as tire inner-tube repair...

    3.) Particulars that will make repairs more difficult are along any seam-lines or d-rings, baffles between air chambers, and the complexities of the I-beam floor.

    ------ One very common issue on the Otter is a circle-shaped abrasion right to the bottom of the boat directly underneath the valving.

    ------ Another tip is to make sure you routinely check and clean inside the boat along the edges of the floor (or gap) between the tube and the self-bailing holes... quite a bit of grit or fishing hooks and bottle tops to garbage can find its way in there gradually causing pin-holing in a challenging spot to discover & make for some awkward repairs.

    ------ Final suggestion is to always check your valving before you head out on your float trips... and know how to maintain parts or replace valving.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    158

    Default

    I had one major repair on my cat tubes from just what Mr. Strutz mentioned, dragged inflated boat across a sharp rock, just caught enough of the rock to slice it like a knife... bam, emergency deflation..

    All at the bottom of 6-miles 3rd canyon... getting it out of there was another story....


    Thats probably 6 or 7 years ago now and the patch is still holding..

    Anyway, my suggestion is just to add this to your repair kit... Find a set of the larger, long, curved sewing needles. Curved to a half circle, and a good 2-3 inches in length.. Then I think I actually used some lighter weight sinew type thread.


    One of the great things about the Aires is the ability to open up the outer tube and get inside... Patching from the inside can really help the patch hold. Cant do that on my cat tho.. So after clean and prep work was done, but before I applied the patch, I sewed up the tear, somewhat loosely. I think this helped in several regards. Helped keep the tear from splitting and extending the rip. Helped with strength, whereas otherwise all the pressure would pulling the tear apart beneath the patch... This way the stitch holds the rip together, and the patch makes the seal (in theory)...

    Anyway, it's really held up..

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •