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Thread: New bow hunter

  1. #1

    Default New bow hunter

    Im looking to get a bow for moose season, I havn't had much experience and was hoping to get details on what you think would be a good set up or tell me yours? Thanks,

    AlpineAce

  2. #2
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Default

    where ya at ace?
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  3. #3

    Default

    Mile 63 Denali hwy =P, I was hoping to look for something online but I can look around anchorage/wassila....But mostly I was trying to see what people were shooting or would like to shoot.

    AlpineAce

  4. #4
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    well. you should really hit a shop.. either in Fairbanks or Anch, valley. and try and one on. I am fond of Martins.. don't care for Hoyt's and there are several out there that just have to small a grip for me. find something you like and then shop for the one you want... also will be able to try different release, rest, sights. have one adjusted to YOUR draw... peeps and sights if you decide to use them will be set to your stature.. a good bow is an extension of your arm, and once it is tuned to you. it's yours, nobody else will be able to shoot it accurately
    .
    riser height, weight, poundage, let off are all things to consider when picking your bow also... some are more forgiving to new shooters, then other.

    Mathews, martin, bow tech, Hoyt, alpine,...all are different all shoot different, and feel different... just to name a few. you should handle (fondle) and fall in love with the one you choose. it's akin to getting a new puppy.....if you head north to FBk.. Tom at kings knock will set you up...

    i am not sure who is in the Valley.. but i hear Archers den is the place in Anchorage.... ( i have never been there) Paul is a member here and hope fully will chime in..

    Vince
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  5. #5
    Member ak_sierra's Avatar
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    Exclamation new bow

    You should check out my posting in the swapNsell forum here for my Bowtech Tomkat package. I've got everything you need except for the broadheads. Over $1000.00 worth of equipment and I only want $700.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=52083

  6. #6
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    Default Backcountry Archery

    My husband and i just got new bows in December. Bill at Backcountry Archery is the place to go. He will help you sight it in and is very helpful with any questions you might have. He is on Arctic Blvd right past the train tracks.

  7. #7
    Member BearSlayer's Avatar
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    Default Bows

    I shoot a Matthews and love it; but I also have a recurve that I enjoy shooting and I am going to use during bear season. But; I started out with Martin bows and would recommend them to anyone. You can't beat the price and value of the product.

  8. #8
    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    To go back to your original question...I would say the majority of folks shoot a compound bow. Next would be a recurve, and then the really hard core go for a long bow. Each has its advantages and disadvantages. The *brand* name is less important than *how it feels* in your hand. The nice thing about a pro shop is that you sometimes can handle a few different types of bows and see what you like. There are tons of web sites where you can read up on folks like you.

    When I decided to get a bow I decided on going for a compound. Two friends (mentors) helped me choose what was *right* for me. One shot a Hoyt while the other shot a Mathews (at the time, the two top-of-the-line bows on the market). Now there are many great bows. With my hand I found that a Mathews fits perfect while the Hoyt is uncomfortable. A Browning or Martin actually hurts my hand as they rock back awkwardly for me, but that is me, not you.

    Don't get hung up on how fast a bow is (pounds to pull). Alaska requires a bow of at least 50# pull (I think) to kill a moose, but Uncle Ted swears a 20# bow will do if you know how to shoot right. Practice is the key. Once you get a bow, promise yourself for the first 6-12 months you will shoot at least 6 arrows every day regardless of weather. By the time you are ready to take your hunting test you will ace just about anything they throw at you.

    Another good thing to do is go to a 3D shoot some weekend and watch. I would bet everyone you talk to would love to *help* in some small way. There are always great comrades at these events. All three styles are shot and you may find out what you like most. This weekend at the MatSu UAA campus of Trunk in Palmer is a premier event...worth going to for a hour or more (even without a bow). The Wasilla Sportsman's Warehouse is doing 3D shoots on Wednesday afternoons, Bear Paw off Seward Meridian in Wasilla also has a small outdoor shooting range and Scott is a great guy to help get you *set up*.

    Hope this gives you a little more to think about. Welcome to *our* community
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  9. #9
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    Default

    Go see Scott at BearPaw archery in Wasilla. He can steer you in the right direction.

  10. #10
    Premium Member denalihunter's Avatar
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    Default Ace

    Hey Ace!

    Before you go running around looking around for a bow, can you move the lodge back to Mile 68?

    Thanks!
    Experience Real Alaska! www.alpinecreeklodge.com

  11. #11
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    Default Just Some Insight

    Well you posted this a while ago so I'm sure you have already been out and got yourself a bow but I thought I would get on and share my two cents incase you haven't yet. What worked really well for me was research. I learned as much as I could about the mechanics of a bow, and then started talking to people I know that bowhunt. Then I researched a lot of different types of bows that way I had an idea of what I was looking for when it was finally time to go out and buy one. I walked into Sportsmans with 4 different bows that I wanted to try out and walked out with a bow that wasn't even on my list. The statement was made that a bow needs to be an extension of your arm....you can't make a more true statement. And then yes it sounds like a time and effort, but for your benifit, shoot EVERY DAY for at least 6 months. I got my bow cert just days after I bought my first bow, but some nice people on this very website strongly suggested that I don't hunt with it until I have had plenty of practice. I sure am glad I was smart enough to take thier advice because when I finally did go out and hunt 8 months later for the first time with my "new" bow, I was so nervous when I drew back that I coudn't bring myself to release the arrow. Had I not taken that time to practice I probably would have attempted the shot, regaurdless of how badly I was shaking and probably would have wounded the animal. So I would like to say thank you to people like Dave in the Bush that were willing to give a newbe like me some great advise. ALL NEW BOWHUNTERS should really take that same advise seriously. I still haven't gotten my first big game animal with a bow yet but every encounter was amazing anyway. And the grouse that I did get with my bow at 30 yards tasted better than any other bird I've gotten with a shotgun. Anyway back what the subject at hand. If you haven't already bought your bow....and even if you have....here is a great website to help you learn about the mechanics of a bow. www.huntersfriend.com/bowselection.htm good luck and have fun!!!!
    Last edited by AK Diamond; 07-07-2009 at 20:36. Reason: web address added

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