Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21

Thread: Cargo Storage

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    111

    Default Cargo Storage

    This may seem like a very simple question but how are all of you storing your gear? This is our first year on the rivers so I just want to do see what everyone else is doing.

    I have a 13ft round boat non self bailing. I think that all gear should be kept off the floor to reduce the risk of running a ground. Are most of you just using cargo nets and if so is this cargo net worth the money http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.a...m-1805-To-1802

    Thanks

  2. #2
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,767

    Default Gear stowage on round boats

    Quote Originally Posted by windswept View Post
    This may seem like a very simple question but how are all of you storing your gear? This is our first year on the rivers so I just want to do see what everyone else is doing.

    I have a 13ft round boat non self bailing. I think that all gear should be kept off the floor to reduce the risk of running a ground. Are most of you just using cargo nets and if so is this cargo net worth the money http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.a...m-1805-To-1802

    Thanks
    Wind,

    To suspend your gear off the floor of a round boat, you need a CARGO PLATFORM, which is secured to the boat by straps running through the D-rings on the platform, and to the rings on the boat. Note that some round boats require additional D-rings to properly support the load. The cargo platform should be suspended two or three inches off the floor.

    The net you pictured is a CARGO NET that is used over the top of your load, to keep items from falling overboard in the event of a capsizing. This too is secured to the D-rings on the boat.

    Finally, note that some self-bailer pilots load their gear directly on the floor. I prefer suspending it, but to each his own. Catarafts are rigged a bit differently but the concept is the same.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  3. #3
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    I got the cargo platform that Mike suggest. I also have a bucket. Mine is 14.5' and I went with the large size. Have not put it in the boat yet though. This sounds like a good way to store gear in the raft, cargo net on top if you choose. With a non self bailer, I would consider getting the gear off the floor a must.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    111

    Default

    Thanks guys, that makes more sense. I will get the platform and the net. Do you think two of each will be an overkill for a 13ft. Reason being I figure the cargo in the back and the dogs on the other platform on the front.

  5. #5
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    I would just use one for the back of the raft. Keep the dogs nails short and let them go where they want. Likely, they will do this anyway.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    111

    Default

    That's true, thanks again.

  7. #7
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Thumbs up On the Floor...

    I run AIRE self-bailing rafts, a 13' 6" Super Puma and a 15' 6" D series, both with inflated floors. Unlike others, I just toss in every bag onto the raft floor. Rafts fill up so fast, I need every inch of space. Figure that the oarsman gets most of the middle third of the boat and the passenger(s) get most or the front third, so that only leaves the aft third for gear bags. Your 13" boat is going to fill up everywhere fast.

    Back in my old avon non-bailers I did put a few holes in boats when I got lazy and did not use suspension nets to get the gear off those floors. But with the new inflated floors I now routinely put the gear bags directly on the floor. I have not screwed-up one of my AIRE self-bailer, inflated floors, so far.

    I see many dogs on Kenai River rafts...have not seen them sink one yet...but would suggest toe-nail maintenance and inspection to absolutely keep your boat looking good.

    Dennis
    AK TAGS

  8. #8

    Default loading rafts

    well- first of all when you put a lot of gear on the floor you change the handling characteristics of any raft (AKA- round boat) even a self-bailer. It is important to distribute the weight on the flotation of the tubes. This lets the floor do its thing. A cargo net is imperative for heavy loads. And Dan as you should well know a Siberian tiger would not put a hole in your SOTAR!!
    cheers- Goo

  9. #9
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,767

    Default More on cargo stowage

    Quote Originally Posted by windswept View Post
    Thanks guys, that makes more sense. I will get the platform and the net. Do you think two of each will be an overkill for a 13ft. Reason being I figure the cargo in the back and the dogs on the other platform on the front.
    Wind,

    The answer to your question completely depends on what you're doing. If you're running an oarsman and a passenger, you can put gear in the back and front, but you'll probably want a seat up front for your passenger. You could also run it as a gear boat with only an oarsman. In that case you'll want platforms and nets at both ends.



    There may be situations where you only need one net and one platform, but if you're doing multi-day expedition trips in Alaska, you'll probably need one at each end.

    As to seating, your passenger could sit on the front thwart as Dan suggested, but I prefer to run my boats without the thwarts. They take up a lot of room in the boat, that I can use to stow gear. Also, I prefer a back-rest on my passenger seats. There's a lot of back strain associated with not having a proper seat. Naturally if you're just doing day trips or are paddle rafting, you could run with the thwarts, because on short trips space isn't usually an issue.

    I see some guys running without nets over their gear, but this makes me a bit nervous. There are many ways for things to go wrong on a river, and many tales of woe coming from folks who wished they had netted their loads. I do it on all my guided float hunts, and even on weekend trips on the upper Kenai. It's just a good habit to have.

    By the way, the platforms come in two sizes; large and small. Measure the inside length and width of the end of your raft to determine the proper one for your boat.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  10. #10
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goeaux View Post

    And Dan as you should well know a Siberian tiger would not put a hole in your SOTAR!!
    cheers- Goo

    Good to hear from you man

    I have no doubt the Sotar you sold me will last a long, long, time.

    Incredible material they use to make them.


    Below is a pic you had sent me last year when I was deciding what raft to buy. Glad I got the Sotar.

    Thanks for hooking me up!






    .
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    111

    Default

    [QUOTE=Michael Strahan;476968] I prefer to run my boats without the thwarts. They take up a lot of room in the boat, that I can use to stow gear. Also, I prefer a back-rest on my passenger seats. ]

    Thanks Guys, I ordered one platform and one net, that should be good enough until I learn what I am doing and actually have the need for more gear.


    Mike, I am curious to know what you use for seats for your passengers if your not using the thwarts. Do you have extra seats on the frame or do use something else.

    Thanks,
    Don

  12. #12
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,767

    Default Seating options on round boats

    [QUOTE=windswept;477015]
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    I prefer to run my boats without the thwarts. They take up a lot of room in the boat, that I can use to stow gear. Also, I prefer a back-rest on my passenger seats. ]

    Thanks Guys, I ordered one platform and one net, that should be good enough until I learn what I am doing and actually have the need for more gear.


    Mike, I am curious to know what you use for seats for your passengers if your not using the thwarts. Do you have extra seats on the frame or do use something else.

    Thanks,
    Don
    Don,

    It all depends on the frame you're running. If you're using the NRS frames, it's pretty easy. All you need is one more crossbar in the front, and you can mount a seat plate directly on that. NRS makes a frame with an inverted foot bar for a seat bar, but this puts the seat up pretty high, and I'd be worried about knocking my passenger off with a sweeper. Also it might be harder to read the river with that person sitting up higher like that.

    Here's a photo of a little NRS Otter we took along on a drop camp moose hunt. We just used it to zip across the river and such, but you can see the passenger seat up front. That system works well for me, anyway.



    For seats, I prefer the Fish-On seats by Tempress. They clip on and off, and swivel 360. You can even get pads for them if you like.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  13. #13

    Default No big fan of the cargo net!

    This may be a bit too late to help Windswept any, but I'm not a big fan of the cargo net most people seem to use in AK. I say that after watching $1000+ of camp chairs, a screen room, rod tubes, tackle boxes, etc, etc take a swim in Lake Creek last year after my brother got his 14' round raft hung up in a sweeper and dumped it. Everything was under a net and secured with probably 5 or 6 cam straps, but the current can exert an incredible amount of force on the raft if the net gets caught in something (and those nets get caught in everything!).

    I've been looking for a better system ever since that painful lesson. I don't know anything about these guys at Clavey, but I like the way they load their raft in this picture:

    http://www.clavey.com/index.php?cPath=1_11

    Medium to large dry bags secured directly with cam straps to the d-rings. They also sell drop bags that secure gear beneath two frame cross-members if you don't want to deal with the hassle of hard-sided rocket boxes or dry boxes on your flyout adventures. I think I'm going to give it a try before hitting the water again this summer.

    Rob

  14. #14
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Default Straps

    nr4,
    I do not use nets.
    I do run a strap through every cargo bag, somewhere, so that I can strap everything down to a D-ring. Them cargo nets do grab everyting, don't they. They are like those "jumping castus" in New Mexico that seem to stick you even from several inches away.
    Dennis

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    111

    Default

    Thanks for all the help, I will also secure all my bags to the D rings. The net will come in handy when transporting game.

  16. #16
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,767

    Default Cargo Net Alternatives

    Quote Originally Posted by rn4cvr View Post
    This may be a bit too late to help Windswept any, but I'm not a big fan of the cargo net most people seem to use in AK. I say that after watching $1000+ of camp chairs, a screen room, rod tubes, tackle boxes, etc, etc take a swim in Lake Creek last year after my brother got his 14' round raft hung up in a sweeper and dumped it. Everything was under a net and secured with probably 5 or 6 cam straps, but the current can exert an incredible amount of force on the raft if the net gets caught in something (and those nets get caught in everything!).

    I've been looking for a better system ever since that painful lesson. I don't know anything about these guys at Clavey, but I like the way they load their raft in this picture:

    http://www.clavey.com/index.php?cPath=1_11

    Medium to large dry bags secured directly with cam straps to the d-rings. They also sell drop bags that secure gear beneath two frame cross-members if you don't want to deal with the hassle of hard-sided rocket boxes or dry boxes on your flyout adventures. I think I'm going to give it a try before hitting the water again this summer.

    Rob
    I hear you on the nets getting caught, and I can see where that could happen on brushy rivers. I've never had this kind of trouble, but I understand what you're saying. One nice thing about the net though, is that I can easily spread a tarp over my load and put the net over that. For hunting trips, this "camouflages" the many colors of my gear load, and gives me good protection from splashing and such. This is especially important with game meat, which should remain dry. The tarp also provides a place for passengers to tuck small items such as lunch bags, gloves and the like, if it starts to rain. Finally, the tarp can be used to duct rain and splash out of a standard-floor round boat, where it would otherwise accumulate inside and have to be bailed or dumped out later. To do this, ensure that the edges of the tarp lay outside the boat (don't tuck them in, in other words), and make a small "rain gutter" by folding the edge of the tarp up, where it runs across the inside of the boat. This allows rain to run outside into the river.

    If someone is going to use straps alone though, I suggest the NRS Loop Straps. Hard to describe the way they work in print, but check the link and you'll get the idea. I use these on my boats and they're great. The nine-footers have proven the most useful, as they accommodate even the largest loads. If I were running with straps alone and no cargo net, I would use at least four running front to back, and at least three from side to side.

    Finally, not to get too far off track here, but the two issues I have with the Clavey system are as follows:

    1. Dry boxes. Most of the professionals I know that do flyout trips up here rarely use dry boxes. They're not airplane friendly and they're heavy. It's nice to have a frame where the boxes just drop in to the bays made for them, but it's impractical for many trips in Alaska.

    2. Hollandaer Fittings. Clavey uses the Hollandaer fittings on their frames. Normally these fittings are secured with set screws, but many folks use quick-release pins. The pins are made of steel, while the frame is aluminum. Eventually the holes where the pins go through the pipe "wow out" and the frame develops a rattle. This is a bad problem to have on a float hunt, where any sounds you make echo across the flat surface of the water and around the next bend. This alerts game to your presence and compromises your hunt.

    I do like the concept of drop bags and I think they could be very useful on certain trips. The Clavey bags have no top though, and cannot be removed from the boat very easily. So you have to put something over the top of them and secure that to the frame. What's the difference between doing that and simply securing a dry bag to the frame with straps? Cascade Outfitters makes a Mesh Drop Bag that closes on top, and offers great storage for pumps, repair kits and other items that don't require waterproof protection. Down River Equipment's "Captain's Bag" offers splash-proof coverage in a closed bag, which is accessed via a zipper on top. The problem with these bags is that they only really accommodate smaller items though. Your larger dry bags must go in the bow and stern. Still, if someone is looking for stowage of smaller items, they could be the way to go.

    Take care,

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  17. #17

    Default

    Speaking of loop straps. I picked up some looped straps at Fred Meyer that where for tying down motor cycles. They are about 2' long with a large loop on one end and a small loop on the other. I bought a couple of quick links in the hardware section and made a set of oar tethers. Haven't checked to see if they still have them, but they could have 101 uses on a boat.

  18. #18

    Default

    Thanks for the links Mike, I'm going to have to go measure my frame and see how one of those Captain's Bags would work. I wasn't so much promoting the Clavey Frame as commenting on how well they stow their gear. It may not work as well on a hunting trip with animal carcass all over the place, but their system definitely looks like it would keep your gear secure in rough water. I think the drop bag would be the perfect place to store all the loose junk that you need to carry, but don't use all the time. Stuff like air pumps, tool/patch kit, propane bottles, camp stove, whatever. Sure you could put all that stuff in a large dry bag, but I hate trying to find something and dig it out of the bottom of a dark dry bag. Otherwise, that stuff gets thrown under the cargo net individually and may not stay there if disaster strikes. Of course there is more than one way to skin a cat, and these guys have come up with a giant (and more expensive) bag that would hold all your gear in one place:

    http://www.cascadeoutfitters.com/ind...664050&framein=

    Just another possible answer.

    One more idea that I saw on the river last year that I really liked. One fella actually mounted a couple of u-shaped ATV rifle mounts to the frame crossbar at the front of the rower's cockpit just aft of the cooler. Looked like a much better option than having your rifle/shotgun strapped to the frame along the side of the raft, where it's more difficult to get free and you're always trying to avoid stepping on it when you get into and out of the boat.

    Rob

  19. #19

    Default Inside D-rings?

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
    nr4,
    I do not use nets.
    I do run a strap through every cargo bag, somewhere, so that I can strap everything down to a D-ring. Them cargo nets do grab everyting, don't they. They are like those "jumping castus" in New Mexico that seem to stick you even from several inches away.
    Dennis
    Dennis, does your raft have D-rings on the inside of the tubes? I've been thinking about adding a few to give a couple more tie-down points.

  20. #20

    Default jan has all the goods

    Get all your straps, drop bags, octo-harness (yeah), captains bags, cat tramp floors and much more from Jan at stichs n stuff. Best prices and bomber construction. I have a bunch of her stuff an it rocks.
    http://www.stitchesnstuff91.com/

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •