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Thread: Penninsula brownie sightings

  1. #1
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    Default Penninsula brownie sightings

    I have a tag and my first week hunt was cut short do to avalanches, so any help on sightings of brownies on the penninsula would be much appreciated.

  2. #2

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    Why dont you just go back in for that booner. You had the right area.

  3. #3

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    Please explain about the Avalanches.........?

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hopeak View Post
    Please explain about the Avalanches.........?

    avalanche |ˈavəˌlan ch |
    noun
    a mass of snow, ice, and rocks falling rapidly down a mountainside.
    • a large mass of any material moving rapidly downhill : an avalanche of mud.
    • figurative a sudden arrival or occurrence of something in overwhelming quantities : we have had an avalanche of applications.
    • Physics a cumulative process in which a fast-moving ion or electron generates further ions and electrons by collision.
    verb [ intrans. ]
    (of a mass of snow, ice, and rocks) descend rapidly down a mountainside.
    • [ trans. ] (usu. be avalanched) engulf or carry off by such a mass of material : the climbers were avalanched down the south face of the mountain.
    • [ intrans. ] Physics undergo a rapid increase in conductivity due to an avalanche process.
    ORIGIN late 18th cent.: from French, alteration of the Alpine dialect word lavanche (of unknown origin), influenced by avaler ‘descend’ ; compare with Italian valanga.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Git-r-done View Post
    avalanche |ˈavəˌlan ch |
    noun
    a mass of snow, ice, and rocks falling rapidly down a mountainside.
    • a large mass of any material moving rapidly downhill : an avalanche of mud.
    • figurative a sudden arrival or occurrence of something in overwhelming quantities : we have had an avalanche of applications.
    • Physics a cumulative process in which a fast-moving ion or electron generates further ions and electrons by collision.
    verb [ intrans. ]
    (of a mass of snow, ice, and rocks) descend rapidly down a mountainside.
    • [ trans. ] (usu. be avalanched) engulf or carry off by such a mass of material : the climbers were avalanched down the south face of the mountain.
    • [ intrans. ] Physics undergo a rapid increase in conductivity due to an avalanche process.
    ORIGIN late 18th cent.: from French, alteration of the Alpine dialect word lavanche (of unknown origin), influenced by avaler ‘descend’ ; compare with Italian valanga.
    That was sp wrong, but it made me laugh. Best explaination Ive ever read.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel in Ak View Post
    That was sp wrong, but it made me laugh. Best explaination Ive ever read.
    And the reason this would terminate a Hunt is.........What??????

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hopeak View Post
    And the reason this would terminate a Hunt is.........What??????
    Just guessing here, but perhaps because he didn't want to die. A lot of spring bear hunting, as you're aware, is done in the mountains on slopes that can be avalanche-prone given the correct conditions. We've been in the midst of some pretty serious avalanche cycles in recent weeks, particularly in the Kenai Mountains. I'm guessing the guy assessed the danger, his own avalanche knowledge, and made a decision based upon the risk. Good on him. Avalanche fatalities are totally preventable, and the bears will still be there next week.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    I would have to guess that the highway being closed would have more to do with it then anything... kind of hard to hunt if you can't get there...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Just guessing here, but perhaps because he didn't want to die. A lot of spring bear hunting, as you're aware, is done in the mountains on slopes that can be avalanche-prone given the correct conditions. We've been in the midst of some pretty serious avalanche cycles in recent weeks, particularly in the Kenai Mountains. I'm guessing the guy assessed the danger, his own avalanche knowledge, and made a decision based upon the risk. Good on him. Avalanche fatalities are totally preventable, and the bears will still be there next week.

    I live in the Kenai Mountains, I Ski-Doodle, hike and/or snowshoe everyday. Avalanche danger is reason of caution, yes. But this time of year I fine the bears will come straight down to the valley floor. I would be inclined to glass the the hillsides, from the safety of the floor, and let the bear more or less come to me, buy carefully moving to a point of interception.

  10. #10

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    Not all bears come right down once they first emerge from the den. Some poke their head out then go right back inside, some come out and might hang out for up to a week, sometimes longer. He did the right thing by not going, his life is not worth losing opver a bear.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by AkHunter45 View Post
    Not all bears come right down once they first emerge from the den. Some poke their head out then go right back inside, some come out and might hang out for up to a week, sometimes longer. He did the right thing by not going, his life is not worth losing opver a bear.
    Yes, I have three dens behind my cabin on the mountain, and at times they are out in the middle for the winter for a day or two. My point is there is no food up there, and once they depart the den, they more or less come down. My understanding was that he went, and came back early for a reason having to do with the avalanches. My point is you can and often times have to work around the avalanche danger.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    I would have to guess that the highway being closed would have more to do with it then anything... kind of hard to hunt if you can't get there...
    Good point, Vince. The road was closed for a time heading south last week.

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    Default back on point

    I did make it out there and stayed two and saw a couple avalanches come down and since I was by myself and if for whatever reason I did end up in the bottom of an avalanche I would have been there for a week before any I e would have decided to come look for me. So I came backs when I did and then the big storm hit the pass making it hard to get back down after dropping the sled. I will be going back down every work weekend until I get one. But back on point I am looking for sightings so I can determine which area I have the best chance of on a two day hunt.

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    Default permit area?

    Just s small point of information required...what tag did you get and/or for which area of the Kenai? This could help with people's efforts to keep you apprised? Just a thought...

  15. #15
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    Default Avalanches and big bears

    They sure are wonderful, both the spring avalanches and the emerging bears. They, the avalanches, will be coming down until late May. That will cut into the spring bear season if a hunter waits until summer. Simply stay out of the avalance chutes as much as possible. Seen hundreds, probably thousands of 'em....avalanches and bears. You can hear 'em, the avalanches, coming usually long before you see 'em. When the sun starts really warming up the mountainsides you might see a hundred avalanches a day, and any day that you are hunting you might see that one big bear. Sounds like your desire to be warm and social exceeded your desire to kill a big bear. Now go back out and hunt.

    dennis

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    Default The tag

    I drew a db303 which is open to units 7 and 15 which covers the whole kenai pen. And then some

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    Let us know what unit you're hunting. I may be down in unit 7 this weekend scouting/hunting for a black bear. I would be happy to let you know if I see anything if that's your area.

    Brett

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    Default Both

    I am open to both areas

  19. #19
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    Smile Db303

    Quote Originally Posted by mudman1 View Post
    I drew a db303 which is open to units 7 and 15 which covers the whole kenai pen. And then some
    Mudman: Perhaps a bit of clarification is in order for your hunt area. From the ADF&G site, your boundaries are roughly from the Portage area to Spencer Glacier to Moose Pass, Cooper Landing and down to Skilak Lake. This area is a lot of Unit 7 and the northern portion of Unit 15A. Not trying to be anal, but I want to make sure you know your boundaries, as well as the guys who are trying to help you out. You've drawn the best area for brown bear on the Peninsula in my opinion for a spring hunt. Good luck.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudman1 View Post
    I drew a db303 which is open to units 7 and 15 which covers the whole kenai pen. And then some
    Thought I'd help you out a smidge as your reply seemed a little...well...out of reach of the facts. I'd hate to see an accident of area on your part...

    Click on the link for the F&G map of the actual area...

    bhtr
    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/GIS/m...bear/db303.gif

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