Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26

Thread: Working at Nancy Lake...

  1. #1

    Default Working at Nancy Lake...

    Hi there everyone! At the beginning of May I'll be moving to Alaska to work at Nancy Lake State Park on the Trail crew as a volunteer for 3 months. I've always wanted to visit Alaska and I figure this is my way of doing that while giving back to the area at the same time. I'm extremely excited but also not entirely sure what to expect and what to bring. If anyone has any advice for me in general or in regards to the Nancy Lake area I'd really appreciate you input...Thanks!

  2. #2
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    KP, the dingleberry of Alaska
    Posts
    1,750

    Default

    Good raingear and XtraTufs. And a compass; easy to get turned around in that low lake country.

  3. #3

    Default

    Exactly how many degrees off of true north is it around there? I'm assuming about 25-30 degrees east of north variance? I guess that'd be a good thing to learn in case I actually need to use my compass. As far as that raingear is concerned, any particular brand or retailer you recommend for something that actually keeps you dry?

  4. #4
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    KP, the dingleberry of Alaska
    Posts
    1,750

    Default

    Maybe a GPS would serve better; I heard somewhere that the volcanic eruptions we've been having will mess with a compass. Don't know if there's any truth to it. For raingear, Helly Hansen or Grundens.

  5. #5
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    I think the declination is 27 degrees...at least it was when my topos were put out in like 1954...

    Helly Hansen raingear is good. Xtratuffs are good. Good quality hiking boots are helpful. Last summer was wet and cool all summer. Fleece is a good choice. Of course it could be 80 degrees and sunny. Buy bug dope, preferably the 100% deet uncle bens or equal. I hate that stuff on my skin, so I put it all around the bottom of my baseball hat to keep the skeeters off my ears. Keep the 100% deet off your helly hansens or they will melt...

    I worked for the state parks back in 95 as a volunteer. It was a great experience. The folks at Nancy Lake are good people.

    Twist, PM sent...

  6. #6
    Member big_dog60's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    between wasilla and palmer
    Posts
    1,061

    Default

    Don't forget fishing poles.

  7. #7

    Default

    Ya, luckily since I'll be working at the park, they said they will provide some poles unless I just want to bring one of mine...I have a few nice ones but I'd rather not chance any damage in transit since I'm sure theirs will do fine. I'm also going to have weekends off, so any suggestions on places I should go or things I should do are appreciated.

  8. #8
    Member WaterWolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    411

    Default

    Head Net and Bear Spray.

  9. #9

    Default

    NOAA mg declination calculator:
    http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/geomagmodel...alcDeclination

    About 19-20deg east and decreasing here in the Valley.

  10. #10

    Default

    Cool link...thanks Eric.

    I really can't wait to head up there. Watching Alaska Week on Discovery Channel last week was killing me...

    Also, I'll be turning 21 while I am there so if anyone is near Wasilla area and wants to grab a beer around the end of July let me know...

  11. #11
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Rain gear, bug dope, and don't forget a camera. You might also have a few days that you'll want shorts and sun tan lotion. I'm thinking we might have a decent summer.

    Loaner fishing gear has a tendancy to be trashed, so you might re-think bringing a rod and some tackle. I like 1/4" spoons and cast masters for rainbows, u/o spinning rod and reel and 6# test.

  12. #12

    Default

    Thanks Paul. I'm definitely bringing my cameras and figured I'd pack a pair or two of shorts since I'm warm natured anyway. What do you consider a good summer? Here in Texas its not even summer and already 95 degrees today...That is not a good summer to me since I love cold weather. I'll rethink the rod and reel when I'm packing and perhaps throw in my collapsible if nothing else.

  13. #13
    Member Michael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Anchorage / Glennallen
    Posts
    162

    Default

    It hit the high 40's most of the snow was gone and my wife switched over to flip flops. It must be summer!!!!

  14. #14
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    A good summer would be severarl sunny days in a row (especially when fishing), and the temps breaking 80 degrees.

    Seems like last summer it only rarely got into the 70's, and was overcast and drizzly most of the summer.

  15. #15
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    KP, the dingleberry of Alaska
    Posts
    1,750

    Default

    If you've never heard the call of a loon, or the slap of a beaver tail, or seen a big bull moose or a black bear swimming across a lake, or sat in a canoe in the center of a mirror-like pond and watched a rainbow over the spruce bog, Nancy Lake is the best place to fall in love with these things. I'm sure you'll never forget your time there. I might even see you there; when I win the strip canoe from the Sportsman's Show, that's the first place I'm headed.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    A good summer would be severarl sunny days in a row (especially when fishing), and the temps breaking 80 degrees.

    Seems like last summer it only rarely got into the 70's, and was overcast and drizzly most of the summer.
    I'd actually rather it not get into the 80's... 70's or lower is about right for me...I cringe at the thought of 80+ weather. I don't have an issue with sunny days, just as long as its still cool or cold out.

    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    If you've never heard the call of a loon, or the slap of a beaver tail, or seen a big bull moose or a black bear swimming across a lake, or sat in a canoe in the center of a mirror-like pond and watched a rainbow over the spruce bog, Nancy Lake is the best place to fall in love with these things. I'm sure you'll never forget your time there. I might even see you there; when I win the strip canoe from the Sportsman's Show, that's the first place I'm headed.
    Ya, as I get closer and closer to leaving, I find it harder and harder to wait. I finally booked my flight yesterday and that was what really solidified it in my mind. Now I have the unpleasant task of telling my current boss that I am putting in my 2 weeks notice.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    In my RV on the road less traveled...
    Posts
    147

    Default

    Don't worry about your boss, he'll get over it, of course he may be a bit jealous I know I would be.
    Steve

  18. #18

    Default

    Actually, my boss ended up being fine with it and said my job will be waiting when I get back.

    On a different note, does anyone have any recommendations on good steel toe boots? Preferably something that would be comfortable to hike in as well. I need steel toe for some of the work I'll be doing...

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    In my RV on the road less traveled...
    Posts
    147

    Default

    My best friend of over 40 years lives in Anchorage. He's very active outdoors hiking, hunting, fishing and working his bird dogs nearly every chance he gets (it's why he moved there 32 years ago). He wears LaCrosse rubber knee boots and converted me over on my last hunting trip with him. My LaCrosse rubber knee boots are very comfortable and durable. I've never worn LaCrosse steel-toed rubber knee boots, but here's the section of their website advertising their steel-toed rubber boots http://www.lacrossefootwear.com/p2p/...c=false&page=1 .
    From what I've seen other Alaskans wear when I've been there I suspect many forum members will agree with me (even if I am currently living in Texas!).
    Steve
    PS BTW I first tried cheaper rubber boots and they didn't last, after one month the rubber across the top of the boots foot (where the rubber flexs when you walk) split on both boots, fortunately I bought them at Gander Mountain and was able to take them back. Stay with LaCrosse you'll be glad you did.

  20. #20
    Member garnede's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    soon to be back in Alaska
    Posts
    1,214

    Default

    +1 on the fishing gear, for rainbows, pike, and: king, red, pink, chum, and silver salmon. You will be a few miles from the Willow River, which has good fishing. The canoe system has rainbows and lots of pike. Bring your own poles, you will have them when you want them and they will be taken care of.

    +1 on the bens 100% deet, good stuff.

    Boots should be knee high and water proof minimum.

    A comfortable daypack is a must. You can keep food, drink, camera, Bens 100%, and maybe a fishing pole handy for when you want it.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •