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Thread: Hunting partner/teacher needed

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    Default Hunting partner/teacher needed

    Hello all, now that spring is here I would like to go with anybody who is plannning a hunt for moose/bear/dear. I have most supplies "I think" for a hunt to include a 30-06 and a 50 cal muzzel loader. If there is anyone that will let me tag along just to help carry meat out or whatever, I'll be thankful. I would love to do some fishing too. I don't care the type if you know how to cook it. Thanks for reading this and I hope we all get what we hunting for this year.

  2. #2
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default friendly advice

    There is a bunch of great members on the forum and some are willing to take and teach others but many are very selective about new partners. I might suggest that you provide alot more info about yourself to get any kind of respones. Your profile doesn't even state where you are located. Add as much info as you can, ie. age, weight, limitations, location, availability, experience, smoker, drinker, equipment, I think that you get the idea. Good luck

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default dating site

    Ya, don't you know that this is a secret dating site and female posters looking for "partners" get quick offers!

    Honestly...............your gonna have to kinda sell yourself first.

    I've been watching and contributing to this board a few years and I can tell you of about 4-8 other posters that if asking I'd honestly offer to help or join them on a hunt. That doesn't happen overnight and you gotta let us know your up to the challenge and have a high level of commitment.

    Of those posters I'd enjoy hunting with.....ALL have experience and ALL have shown a high level of intellegence and integrity.

    Good luck in all you do.

  4. #4
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Good suggestion...

    by tboehm. These are big trips for hunters, maybe the only trip each year so they have a lot at stake. The extra details will help others match you up with their trip expectations. Alcohol is a good example. In an AOD thread discussing the topic, responses for and against were both represented by experienced, seemingly responsible hunters - and both were pretty clear about their positions on the matter.

    My favorite parts of Rich Hackenberg's book, Moose Hunting in Alaska - were his stories about things that can go wrong sometimes with hunting partners -good illustrations for making a careful match.

    If you should need a plan B, some AOD members have also found ways to get out solo - hunted within their abilities and done well. Check out Cast&Blast's posts for one. Interesting reading at least.

    Best of luck getting out this year.

  5. #5
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    Default additional info to hunting partner/teacher needed

    Hello all, thanks to some great feedback from some of the readers I now know to give a few details about myself. i'm 35, 5'11, 230 lbs. no handy caps to speak of I don't care what my co-workers say. Helping out with paying or going somewhere. I will need some heads of before a trip because i'm in the Air Force, so I will have to let them know before hand where we would go and so on ...I have a -35 sleeping bag several mre's/mountain meals, meat bags a 2 man tent w/gear. I have a 1/2 ton truck w/ a topper. I'm in good health and better ambition to learn hunt, kill, clean up, and process whatever. No ATV yet (on the to get list). Anyother tips or quations please let me know. Thanks for reading.

  6. #6
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Go Solo...

    EzyR,
    I suggest you plan a solo black bear hunt or two. Use your imagination. It's east if you try.

    You will gain a tremendous amount of experience fumbling and bumbling around by yourself for awhile. And by going solo you will learn about yourself....like if the hunting and killing fire really burns within yourself. By age 35 most of us know if we really want to kill stuff. By age 25 I was certain I did not want to golf.

    Just start with the info on this forum, and the gear you already have. After a few black bear hunts and backpacking weekend trips you will have the confidence for other adventures. But I do agree that to tackle a moose it is a great help to hava an experienced hunting partner to provide guidance.

    Does Eielson Air Plane Patch have a bow club? Join it. They must have some type of outdoors activities planned with MWR-OAP. Volunteer for the OAP program (ask MWR what it is) and you will meet some dudes that hike, raft, canoe and hunt.

    But again, if the fire burns within you...try some solo weekends trips.

    ....and start walking-hiking 5 miles every day...no more ding-dongs...

    Dennis
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
    You will gain a tremendous amount of experience fumbling and bumbling around by yourself for awhile.
    Great point. I was talking to a friend today about learning field dressing and cape care skills. I took him on his first caribou hunt, and while I was trying to teach him as we went, ultimately I did most of the work. When he inquired about videos and such today, I pointed him in the right direction but also shared the same advice as above. Reading and watching videos is helpful, but he'll never really learn how to butcher and cape an animal until he does it a few times himself. The same is true of other hunting skills - doing it yourself can be ridiculously challenging at first, but it imparts valuable lessons and develops a love of hunting in many at the same time. I recall my first sheep kill, which was also solo. It absolutely kicked my butt beyond what words can describe, but I learned so much about myself and about hunting on that trip. I love hunting with a partner most days, but I wouldn't trade that solo experience for the world.

    All of that being said, I imagine if you talk to folks there on base that you can find someone willing to take you out. Offer to haul bait for someone running a bear bait station. Hauling hundreds of pounds of bait can be back breaking, so if you offer to haul bait and make it clear that you don't expect to get a shot in return, I'd bet you'll get some takers.

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    Default why the right hunting partner is important

    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    Ya, don't you know that this is a secret dating site and female posters looking for "partners" get quick offers!

    Honestly...............your gonna have to kinda sell yourself first.

    I've been watching and contributing to this board a few years and I can tell you of about 4-8 other posters that if asking I'd honestly offer to help or join them on a hunt. That doesn't happen overnight and you gotta let us know your up to the challenge and have a high level of commitment.

    Of those posters I'd enjoy hunting with.....ALL have experience and ALL have shown a high level of intellegence and integrity.

    Good luck in all you do.
    Bighorse is right on the money so far as the whats, but I think that some might not understand the whys.

    In a good bit of the lower 48, the wrong hunting partner will turn your hunting trip that you've waited all year for into a nightmare that you won't want to repeat.

    In Alaska, the wrong hunting partner can kill you, even if only by his inaction or fear, and of also easily by lack of or the wrong preparation.

    You're not in Kansas any more Dorothy.

  9. #9
    Member mmusashi2k's Avatar
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    Default I once went on a hunting trip.....

    with a few folks including a guy who I had never hunted with before. Miles later we banked the canoes and while we were setting up camp this dude produces 2 cases of cheap beer. We were stymied as we didn't even know the beer was in the canoes but even more amusing was to watch said dude drink both cases of beer, fart and belch all night and tell stupid jokes. After this and a few other incidents, I have gotten quite selective about who I will hunt with. The few people that I venture out with nowdays, I knew pretty well before ever hunting with them. Fishing might be a good way to break the ice and start getting to know someone as it is not nearly the commitment as a hunting trip and it kind of lets others figure out just who you are.

    I would imagine there would be quite a number of AF guys who hunt and fish around here. Some have probably been around for a while and have learned a bit about AK. I suppose if you were to just kind of toss it out there occasionally you might be supprised who would be interested and who might have some experience. I would also guess that a bunch of AF guys would have quite a bit in common as far as interests and such which would make them probably a lot less boring to other like minded folks.

    Anyway, I wish you luck in your AK outdoors endeavors as it is always welcome news to know that the interest in hunting is not completely dying, as some would like us to believe.

  10. #10
    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Default

    All of that being said, I imagine if you talk to folks there on base that you can find someone willing to take you out. Offer to haul bait for someone running a bear bait station. Hauling hundreds of pounds of bait can be back breaking, so if you offer to haul bait and make it clear that you don't expect to get a shot in return, I'd bet you'll get some takers.
    I think this is illegal unless you are one of the people who registered the bait station. Otherwise the work could be considered paymet for hunting at their station. The good news is the Bear baiting course is on fish and game's web site. If you find someone who has not registered their site yet you could take the course and co register. Then there would be no issues. Also for weekend trips you might look at either RL450 or RL460 depending on what type of hunting you do. They are close and hike in areas. As long as you are in good shape they are do able. Good luck.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by garnede View Post
    I think this is illegal unless you are one of the people who registered the bait station. Otherwise the work could be considered paymet for hunting at their station. The good news is the Bear baiting course is on fish and game's web site. If you find someone who has not registered their site yet you could take the course and co register. Then there would be no issues. Also for weekend trips you might look at either RL450 or RL460 depending on what type of hunting you do. They are close and hike in areas. As long as you are in good shape they are do able. Good luck.
    Whoop! Thanks for catching that. If he takes the baiting class and is listed on the permit, though, then he would be allowed to help haul bait. It's not much of a hoop to jump through, and I imagine he'd get some takers.

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    Default

    Very interested in reading all of these responses. Having posted a very similar thread several weeks ago, I had some difficulty trying to find someone willing to show a "New Alaskan" the ropes. I am intrigued about peoples suggestion on blazing the trail yourself. Someone suggested RL450 and RL460 both are out of Eagle River, any other suggestions??

    Having come to the realization that going out on my own may be the best option, (due to few suggestions, and not wanting to interfere with someone's trip of the year) I would like a few directions on how one starts to set up a solo hunt. Lets say, spring black bear. No bait, hike in off of the road system.

    Where should a guy go?
    Besides the basics of gun, tent, sleeping bag, framed backpack, cooking stove, food, first aid etc. what does someone need?

    Anybody with a good knowledge, and is willing to share please let me know.

  13. #13
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Go Solo...

    MNAK08,
    Get a map of the Kenai Pen.
    Look for south facing slopes. For isolation, look for slopes that have any type of barrior between the slope and a road. Distance is one barrior. Water is another. Mountains are another barrior. Note...think Johnson Pass trail or a mountain on the south side of Kenai Lake.....or find a hidden paradise.
    Get LaCross Big Chief ankle fit hipboots, along with your other gear.
    Plan to start on the second or third weekend in May.
    Become the predator that you believe you are. Talk is easy. It is now time to perform.
    Hike and glass for black bears on the slopes. The bears will be eating the new blades of grass. Spot, then Stalk, paying attention to the wind. Shoot the bear through the lungs. Take pictures with tripod and self-timer camera. Skin the bear. Debone meat and put in a game bag in your pack. Hike to truck. Go back and retrieve bear hide and your camp stuff.
    Drive home.
    Refine the process, and go again next week.
    Keep your paradise to yourself, or the entire squadron will be there next week.

    Dennis
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    Member Randy907's Avatar
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    Default

    No experience up here and you want him to go solo hunting?? c'mon man, you should never tell someone to go solo............

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    Member OKElkHunter's Avatar
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    Default Solo????

    I agree with Randy. Sending an inexperiencedperson out solo is not a good idea. Too much can go wrong really fast up here and inexperience can get someone seriously injured or "God forbit" killed. Ezyrider, I am thinking about going on a PWS black bear hunt this spring with another budy of mine. I won't promise you a shot, but we may be able to carry another along. pm me for more details. I would also like to know more about you as you would me as well; that's better done over pm or e-mail than over a public forum.
    “Don't expect to build up the weak by pulling down the strong." ~Calvin Coolidge~

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy907 View Post
    No experience up here and you want him to go solo hunting?? c'mon man, you should never tell someone to go solo............
    Could not agree with you more.
    Joe (Ak0

  17. #17
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default Go Solo

    Want, Randy,

    I probably disagree with you more than you disagreed with me.
    Shouldering your pack, shouldering ressponsibility for yourself, is as old as mankind.
    Be your own pack. Become your own tribe.
    I did it.
    I survived.
    I shot my first six rams on solo hunts. Shot my first thee black bears, and first two brown bears when by myself. Shot a bunch of other stuff on solo hunts. I learned alot about myself also.
    Simply respect your limitations...and learn about yourself and Alaska. Unless your stupid, a solo hunter has very little to really worry about.
    I believe all of us are in much more danger driving to work in the morning as opposed to hiking or hunting solo. Driving the seward highway after a weekend on the Kenai River is probably 1000 times more dangerous than hiking and/or hunting solo. Perhaps the Alaska you live, hunt and guide in is much more dangerous than the Alaska I live, hunt, and guide in. Honestly, look at all the people out and about every year all over the state. Some even do stupid stuff like the dude who died in the bus. But he did really stupid stuff. The human gene-pool is no worse off after his demise. And yes, a few people got dinged upiuby bears in the Anchorage bowl last year. But I'm on those same trails most every evening. I see bears also. But unles contact occurs, that is a good bera encounter. How many people, or what percent, of people outdoors get dead of screwed up?
    Not many. Not a high percentage. Not enough and not a high enough percentage to alter my activities.
    So go hiking/hunting. Hike with a friend or a buddy if their schedule is good with your schedule. Or hike and hunt alone, if they can not keep up with you.
    Or watch TV, sole, or with tour tribe.

    Joe, do you have a cat?

    Dennis
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  18. #18

    Default I say go solo too!

    How in the heck did we all learn how to hunt? Cracker jack box? I ended up going by myself more times than I can remember and I am talking 12 years old and older as I aged. I learned from others, but learned much more by myself. One of the best ways to learn is to go solo and find out what you are made of.

  19. #19
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    Default

    I was in the same boat 6 years ago. I really wanted to go caribou hunting and had noone to go with me and was looking hard. I posted a thread here about the trip and had a guy from Detroit respond and send in a deposit to the transporter. Our flight schedule was conflicting and he was to arrive 2 hours behind me in Illiamna. No problem we were going out in a cub anyway. The deal was I would fly out first set up camp and they would return to pick him up and bring him out. I was about 5 miles from being put down and we got a call on the radio from the base saying that he was a no show at the airport. The Pilot turned around and said what do you want to do? I said I came 5000 miles to hunt caribou , I want to go hunting. Thank god I did not rely on him for anything for gear or food.I spent 10 days in the field in some of the best and some of the worst weather I have ever experienced in AK ( 60 hours of recorded 85 mph wind and sideways rain, and sunny 50 degree bluebird days) . I killed a bull on that trip nothing to brag about , but I learned a lot about myself and my abilities. I never heard from the guy ever agian. I have been going back every year since then all but one have been solo fly in moose trips up north. At first it was ok but I find I like hunting with a buddy better but don't have anyone to go with me . Two weeks in the bush alone starts to wear on you after you do it a few times, but If it means staying home or going hunting alone it is then I will not miss an opportunity because I have nobody. I've been in the woods since I was 6 years old so my woodsmanship skills are solid. You have not really given us any info on weather or not you have done solo trips at home or anything of that nature. I will say this, If you are a complete newbie findsomeone don't go it alone. Find someone anyone who has been there and done that to help you on your first trip afield . The other allternitive is to start out small , do an overnighter and gradually build up to longer stays and you work out the situations that come up and rifine to list of things you bring with you out there. Bounce questions here to to some local guys about your experiences and see what kind of feedback you get , undoubtedly there will be many varied answers. Sort through them and pick out the ones that interest you and develope your own theory. Learning this stuff is a long slow process but in the end it will help you figure out who you are and build your confidence in the field. Watch the weather closely and think with your head , if it feels risky in your gut it probably is and help is far away. Leave a game plan with someone tell them when you shouls be home and about where you will be if you go alone even for an overnighter.Plan for the worst and hope for the best at least you will be prepared either way. Sorry to be so long winded.

  20. #20
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default Solo

    And if you are really lucky you might cut the tracks of another hunter somewhere up a canyon along a small creek or stream. It might be my footprints, or those of Northway. Imagine two of us having the same great idea of chasing some rams in the same canyon. You just might meet someone with similar interests, and committments.

    This is how you start. Lean forward, and then just before you fall face first, move your right leg forward. Then continue leaning forward, but this time move your left leg forward...and so on and so on...and you hiking! And if your hiking by yourself, then your hiking solo! Imagine...its easy if you try...(J.L.)

    Northway...you really should guide for me, or for someone.

    Those who are unable or unwilling to do thinks themselves can PM Mr Want or any of the other guides on the forum. Most of us will find a place in our schedule and contract to take you hunting, or refer you to sombody who can.
    Dennis
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