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Thread: My "DIY" flyswatter dipnet

  1. #1
    Member Berto's Avatar
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    Default My "DIY" flyswatter dipnet

    i wanted a dipnet i could repair myself, so i built one. the yellow tape is set at 1-foot to give you an idea for the scale.

    i plan to use this net from my boat. oh, and i bought a union last night and will install it so i can easily replace the net.

    better watch out sockeyes, here i come!

    (you can pm me with the quantity you would like to order ) j/k!


  2. #2
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Default

    Doesn't appear to be very heavy copper tubing. Does it seem sturdy enough?

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default

    I've seen a couple net frames made of 3/4" & 1" copper tubing. It does alright for the actual net frame, but usually doesn't fair very well for the handle. It's just too light for the lateral forces applied to the handle section.

    In this case, it looks like you've got larger material on a short handle, so as long as you're "gentle" with it, it may do OK. My suggestion would be to cut another chunk of the handle material to length and bring it along with your pipecutter, torch, solder, and a handfull of tubing splices. If you hit a big fish and bend the handle, you can cut out the bad chunk and splice it back together in a matter of minutes. Massive damage can be fixed by replacing the entire handle length.

    If you could get a length of heavy wall tubing or bar stock that will fit inside the handle pipe, you could really stiffen up the handle pretty easily.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Member Berto's Avatar
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    Thumbs up stiffness/repair issues

    i went with 1" Type L (the middle of 3 available grades; Type K has thicker walls and Type M has thinner walls than Type L) copper pipe in the handle and 3/4" Type L in the net frame. believe me when i say my net is at least as sturdy if not more sturdy than the commercially available aluminum version.

    yes, i plan to have replacement parts with me when i dip. the ability to make repairs "on the fly" was my primary reason for building my own net out of copper

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    Default Filling

    Quote Originally Posted by Berto View Post
    i went with 1" Type L (the middle of 3 available grades; Type K has thicker walls and Type M has thinner walls than Type L) copper pipe in the handle and 3/4" Type L in the net frame. believe me when i say my net is at least as sturdy if not more sturdy than the commercially available aluminum version.

    yes, i plan to have replacement parts with me when i dip. the ability to make repairs "on the fly" was my primary reason for building my own net out of copper
    Might I suggest using some "filler" to add some rigidity? I used the aerosol spray foam to beef up the tubing in mine. It works really well and doesn't take much to do the job. If it were me, I'd drill some holes just large enough to accommodate the nozzle on the foam can and shoot it up... just a thought.

    (oops, forgot that you're submerging the net from a boat; this may not work so good then as it will add buoyancy, an undesirable effect)
    "He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit is better than he who takes a city." ~ Proverbs 16:32

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    Member Berto's Avatar
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    Thumbs up BackCountryRobb,

    thanks for the input. i have been toying with adding the foam to only the handle...i even bought the foam last week...i will continue to consider it...the bright side is, adding foam is among the modifications i can do later and even to a section at a time until i optimize net performance

  7. #7
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default material costs

    how much do you have into material costs? Did you buy the material in anchorage?

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    Member Berto's Avatar
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    Default Bullelkklr,

    i am not going to BS you. i have about 90% of the cost into my net compared to the commercially available aluminum version with one 5-foot handle. BUT i now have enough material left over to save myself about 30% of the cost if i was to make a second, identical net. again, primarily i wanted to build my own net out of copper because unlike aluminum, i can repair copper.

    excluding the net, all necessary parts were purchased at Lowes in south ANC.

  9. #9
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default so-

    bout a buck fitty ?

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    Default

    How about using a broom stick to stiffen the handle inside, with the tube and broom handle that should stand up to most any king and still be eazy to repair with your present equipment

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    Member Berto's Avatar
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    Default

    bullelkklr, i really have not added it up, but guess about a buck 10 for this first net if i use the spray foam i bought, then if i made a second net it would cost about eighty. i was shocked at how expensive 5 pounds of solder is these days!

    brokeeye, that's another idea, thanks.

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    Default Good Idea

    Quote Originally Posted by Berto View Post
    thanks for the input. i have been toying with adding the foam to only the handle...i even bought the foam last week...i will continue to consider it...the bright side is, adding foam is among the modifications i can do later and even to a section at a time until i optimize net performance
    Floatation in the handle is a great plan; especially if you are unfortunate enough to lose your grip; with a floating handle you incrementally increase your chances of recovering your net. I've seen/heard of a handful of folks losing their net and ruining their trip, even the folks with the "floater" tied to the top of their hoops.
    "He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit is better than he who takes a city." ~ Proverbs 16:32

  13. #13
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default Flotation

    Some super easy and cheap flotation for the handle can be found at your local Fred Meyer or Wal-Mart in the kid's toys. Look for those long foam "noodles" that are for use in swimming pools. Has a hole in the center with a significant amount of bouyant, closed cell foam. Unless you can thread it on from the end of your handle, you just slit it down the side and place it like pipe insulation. Secure in place with some plastic electrical tape. Lots of flotation.

    Foam on just the inside of a piece of pipe generally will not give enough boyancey to float it very well. Especially when you add on hoops, handles, and nets.

    Also, if you're going to foam the inside of a pipe for strength, you're better off going with a 2-part epoxy style foam. The spray can foam is fairly soft, fragile, and it's very difficult to fill the inside of a pipe without a bunch of voids that have no foam in them (and therefore no added strength).
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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