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Thread: Mountain Rifle

  1. #1
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    Default Mountain Rifle

    In the market for a good mountain rifle and was thinking about the Kimber Montana in 300 Win Mag.....Ive got a Kimber Talkeetna 375HH and it really got me hooked on the 8400 series rifles.....the Talkeetna just makes holes a little bigger than .375 @100yrds. Is the 300Win Mag too much horse power for a mountain rifle? I think they weight 7.5 lbs. without the scope. I dont have much experience with that cartridge but know they are good long distance shooters. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
    In the Bush

  2. #2

    Default Reconsider

    While I'm not a big fan of the WSM series of calibers; IF that's what you want I would consider another brand of rifle,

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=52060
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

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  3. #3
    Member markopolo50's Avatar
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    Default Mountain rifle

    I am not familiar with the Kimber rifle but I sure like the 300 Win Mag. I have one in an old Remington 700 BDL and it is my all time favorite. I use 180 grain Nosler partition and have shot antelope to moose. Confidence is a big factor when shooting also as is being familiar with your gun. Good luck in your decision. Mark

  4. #4
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    Default 300 Win Mag, not WSM

    I also dont like the "short mags" because of feeding problems...I was thinking of the full lenght 300 Win Mag. in Kimber Montana. Need all the pros and cons please...could be moving to the bush soon and want something dialed in before I go
    In the Bush

  5. #5

    Default unknown

    Not well versed on Kimbers newer rifles, heard some good and bad. Is this going to be your only rifle?
    For mountain, I mean?
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  6. #6
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    Default Yes

    I was thinking about the Montana 300 Win Mag above timberline where long shots are possible and I'll use my Talkeetna 375HH bellow timberline.
    In the Bush

  7. #7

    Default 300

    I hold much reverence for the 300 WM and own 2. They are accurate and powerful. Ammunition is pretty much available in most places. they do make a harsh little rifle to hold onto at mountain weights though.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

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    Default

    Have you looked at the Tika T3 Lite. I have the stainless model in 300 WM with Leoupold VX-1 4x12 and total weight is 7.25 pounds.

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    Default Any Ideas

    Doesnt have to be a 300WM I just like toet'n all the power I can and still shoot accurately. recoil has never really been an issue with me.
    In the Bush

  10. #10

    Default Me TOO

    Quote Originally Posted by akflyfisher View Post
    Have you looked at the Tika T3 Lite. I have the stainless model in 300 WM with Leoupold VX-1 4x12 and total weight is 7.25 pounds.
    I have one also in 30-06 with a 3x9 on it and it's a great firearm at a resonable price.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  11. #11
    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Default

    My friend bought a kimber montana 300 wsm. I like the feel of the gun, it is light, has controlled round feed, I think it is a good gun. The one thing I didn't like about it was it had no floor plate, so to unload you have to jack your shells out with the bolt. I bought a Browning A-bolt in .270, and I really like this gun. It is a little cheaper than the Kimber, but I would encourage you to take a look at it also.

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    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Default

    I have one in .325wsm. I love it. All else being equal cases with big shoulders don't feed as well as straight cases, but that's relative. If you aren't a fan of wsm then get a Kimber chambered in something else. For a factory rifle it's hard to find a better built or liter rifle. Unless you want to throw down for a Bansner or other custom mountain rifle Kimbers are the way to go.

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    Smile wsm

    Thats weird, the Kimbers have no floor plate and the tikkas have an ejectable magazine you can lose so go figure. I would go for a wsm in a mountain rifle. They are much lighter rounds to carry than traditional magnums and use less powder and everything. The short, light cases are cool. Shoot fast and hit hard. They seem to recoil less to me and I have never had the case capacity problems reloading some have shooting up to 220 grain in my 300. I have never heard of or experienced feeding problems in a wsm so thats new to me....
    I come home with an honestly earned feeling that something good has taken place. It makes no difference whether I got anything, it has to do with how the day was spent. Fred Bear

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default

    Kimber in 300 WM should be fine for a mountain rifle - I don't care for the 26" barrel but do prefer the blind mag. I like my mountain rifles to weigh between 6.5 and 7.5 lbs (rifle, scope, full mag, and sling). I would recommend a Leupold 3 x 9 Ultra Light or the 2.5 x 8 scope. Due to the lack of cover, all the glassing, and sometimes long "approaches" bears are a common occurrence so it is sometimes comforting to be toting a 300 WM not to mention the rather flat trajectory with a wind bucking 180 gr bullet. Just one sheep hunters thoughts - there are many other variations. Good luck on your hunt.

  15. #15
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    Default

    I love my A-bolt mountain TI. its light, durable and shoots precisely. put a good piece of glass on it and youre set. detachable magazine is a plus i think. i keep a heavy load in one magazine in the rifle while walking for bear protection or whatnot, then the lighter bullets for sheep or whatever load i need. http://www.browning.com/products/cat...35&type_id=038

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Browningguy9 View Post
    I love my A-bolt mountain TI. its light, durable and shoots precisely. put a good piece of glass on it and youre set. detachable magazine is a plus i think. i keep a heavy load in one magazine in the rifle while walking for bear protection or whatnot, then the lighter bullets for sheep or whatever load i need. http://www.browning.com/products/cat...35&type_id=038
    Man that is a sweet looking setup, but they are sure proud of them aren't they. Could setup setup 2 Tikka T3s scoped for the price of just that TI. But I give the fact that the weight is pretty sweet on those Browning TIs. I know see why your are Browningguy.

  17. #17
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Akjaq View Post
    In the market for a good mountain rifle and was thinking about the Kimber Montana in 300 Win Mag.....Ive got a Kimber Talkeetna 375HH and it really got me hooked on the 8400 series rifles.....the Talkeetna just makes holes a little bigger than .375 @100yrds. Is the 300Win Mag too much horse power for a mountain rifle? I think they weight 7.5 lbs. without the scope. I dont have much experience with that cartridge but know they are good long distance shooters. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
    hi akjaq; i own and shoot several kimber 84m, 84 montana, and 8400 montana's and have found them to be dependable and very accurate. the "complaint" of no detachable magazine is actually in your favor for moutain hunting. NO LOST MAGAZINE!

    the 8400 montana should weigh only about 6# from the box, which relates to about 7# trailside. i suggest a lightweight 4X or 6X scope as a variable is unnecessary.

    as an aside.......my 8400 montana in 30-06 is (reletively) cheap to shoot, brass is common as nails, and available everywhere. in standard loads, the killing power is nearly the same (in ranges most game is shot), and with the high-speed stuff from hornady and others, it runs about equal.
    this is my set-up, with a fixed leupold 4X. i took a running (wounded) elk at 407 yds this last fall.
    happy trails.
    jh

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    Man that is a sweet looking setup, but they are sure proud of them aren't they. Could setup setup 2 Tikka T3s scoped for the price of just that TI. But I give the fact that the weight is pretty sweet on those Browning TIs. I know see why your are Browningguy.
    shes a very light rifle, pleasure to carry. a thumper to shoot tho, but that doesnt bother me at all. ive been pounding 3.5 in shotgun rounds for years at the ducks and geese lol... i really like the duratouch coating the stock has. it is a hefty price. i bought mine a couple years ago off my dads friend that had it brand new and had maybe 15 rounds through it. i paid less for my rifle with leupold vari-x3 for less than the msrp on it right now. he decided that he just needed a Sako, which worked out great for me. i have no complaints. hell, i flipped a fourwheeler over on it with no problems. i didnt know whether to cry or laugh or freak out. it all turned out well tho. thank God!!!!i recently ordered a sako 375 H&H for the big brownies. its HEAVY tho... i have such a hard time leaving the ultra light a-bolt at home when i go to chase something. ill keep this one forever im sure.
    oh, mines a 300 WSM by the way..........

  19. #19
    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    Default

    Kimber Montana in .300 Win Mag weighs 6 lbs 13 oz according to their website. I am also in the market for a mtn rifle. After all the things I've heard about Kimbers, I will not be buying one of them, especially at that price. I have all but made my mind up on the Browning A-bolt Stainless Stalker in .270 WSM. True, it weighs more than the Ti, but WAY less $$. The A-bolt has a lot going for it IMO. It has a detachable mag AND a floorplate, so you won't lose the mag, but can load/unload easily or switch out mags for a different load. It's stock is not hollow and cheap feeling like the Tikkas, which also helps it balance better. Plus it doesn't have all the plastic like the Tikka, yet weighs about the same.

    But to answer your question, .300 Win Mag is a good one if that is what you decide to go with. As for the Kimber rifle, I have not used one personally but have heard enough bad things about it that it crosses it off my list of possibilities.

  20. #20
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    Browningguy

    sweet rifle for sure. that was the one that i wanted. i like the low weight of the ti, the grip/feel of the duratouch, the durability of the ss, and the overall combo in the browning a-bolt. i just could not bring myself to pay that much, but sounds like you got a good deal. the best i could find was about $1350 (w/o scope) at boondocks a year ago. i ended up finding the standard ss/synthetic a-bolt in the caliber i wanted (.325 wsm) for $699. i put leupold 3.5 x 10 with b&c reticle on it (guilty pleasure) for under $1300 total with mount/rings. i could have gone a little lighter with 2.5 x 8 or 3 x 9. anyway...nice gun you have there!

    hoosier

    i came to the same conclusion that you did about the kimber/tikka and also preferred the browning a-bolt. fyi i was in sw (anchorage) yesterday, and i believe that i saw your exact rifle (.270 wsm browning ss a-bolt) on sale for $630. you might want to check that out - smokin deal.

    akjaq

    i believe that a .300 wm or wsm is a good choice for mountain rifle in bear country. i recently went through this same decision making process. my first choice when not in bear country in a sheep/goat/deer mountain rifle has always been the .270. yet i feel more secure with a .3 cal if grizz/browns are around. for me, that left the .30-06, .300 wm and wsm, .325 wsm, and .338 wm as possible options. the .30-06 is certainly tried and true, but i have one and wanted something with a little better pop. the .338 is also a tried and true caliber, but not my favorite for the mountains because of weight, trajectory, recoil etc. that left the .300's and .325 wsm as the likeliest candidates. the primary upside to the .300 wm is the availability of ammo. otherwise, i preferred the .300 wsm and the .325 wsm. i have never had trouble with the wsm feeds so that was not a factor for me. once i reached this point in my decision making process it became rather easy to choose. the .325 wsm has similar energy/knockdown as the .338 wm with the flatter trajectory of the .300 wm/wsm, and does this in compact size, low weight, and controlled recoil. the cost of same bullets is also similar. IMHO, the only downside to the .325 is the availability of factory ammo. i use the 200 grain accubond, and have had good results. one shot kills on moose and brown bear at 100 and 125 yrds. this year it heads to the mountains of kodiak for deer and to the arctic tundra/mountains for caribou/grizzly.

    although i like the .270 wm/wsm, the .30-06, and the .338 wm i believe that the .300 wm/wsm and the .325 wsm are better performers as mountain rifles in bear country and all-around rifles for alaska. i do not think the .300 is too much firepower. a good choice for your needs. just one man's opinion.

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