Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29

Thread: Just learning about long shots (moon, birds, etc.)

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default Just learning about long shots (moon, birds, etc.)

    I decided to buy a Canon EF-400mm f/5.6L USM prime, and it seems that I will have a good time using this lens. I have taken a few photos of the moon, some with a 1.4X teleconverter attached to the lens, but the lens by itself is sufficient for moon shots like this one. I do need practice as you can tell by the overblown bright spots on the moon, but will do better next time by bringing the ISO down from 320 to 160, or going to f/11 or so instead of f/8.

    400mm, at 100% crop.

    I went to the local dumpster site to take some trash, and there were a few ravens around, and also a bald eagle on top of a tree about 50 yards away. I got just a little closer before it flew away.
    Raven, close enough for a full frame:


    Eagle, 66.66% crop (I believe):

  2. #2

    Default

    Really like the feathers on the eagle. The blue tint to the raven feathers is nice too.

    I'm leaning towards the 100-400mm version still, but appreciate seeing your results.

  3. #3
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sterling
    Posts
    1,450

    Default feathers

    I also like the look of the feathers on that eagle.
    I want to have a Raven as a pet again. I had one when I was a kid and it was really a neat bird..
    So very smart..
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  4. #4

    Default Raven

    Ray,

    I really like your raven. They are such a neat bird. Nice 'Trickster' capture.

    Bruce
    There's a fine line between fishing and just standing on the shore like an idiot.

  5. #5
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sterling
    Posts
    1,450

    Default raven stories

    working over at trading bay on the west side of Cook inlet some years ago, and we had a guy that worked at the facility that fed the ravens.
    they got to trust him,
    they nested on top of some tanks that had like landing covers on top so they could have a roof over the nest.. Smarter than open top nests of other birds..
    When this old boy that fed the ravens started down the road to where he fed them, a few of the ravens would see him coming and fly right along side his truck.
    he asked me to go with him to feed them a time or two so he could show me some of their behaviors he had witnessed.
    So one timeThe raven babies were starting to fly, and so they would come down on the ground to get the free food with the parents.
    the guy would throw a piece of food on the ground and the baby raven would start hopping straight towards the food. the parent watching right near by , would dive in and peck the baby and scold it. Not let it have the food, or make it put the food back down.. then then the parent Raven would demonsrate the proper way to get the food and still keep your guard up..
    the baby would sit and watch while parent positioned its body so it could fly away at anytime in the safest direction, and it would hop sideways to the food with its eye always on the truck and anwywhere else danger could come from... always watching the guy in the truck at all times. even though he had become extremely trusted, they still kept their guard up at all times..
    then the parent would twist his head so his eye never left the guy in the truck then quickly grab the food and take off. and call for the baby to fly off with it, only for them to return to the same spot and the parent would drop the uneaten food back on the ground... back away from the food and then baby was given a chance to try it.. it only took one or two lessons to teach the baby how to get the food in a safe way..
    He knew lots of things they taught their babies like that and he said they were stern parents and the babies were good students and learned fast.
    ..
    Max
    Last edited by Alaskacanoe; 04-07-2009 at 01:48. Reason: stuff added
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  6. #6
    Member Hunt'N'Photos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, Alaska
    Posts
    1,210

    Default

    Very nice Ray! You will love that lens. Its also a favorite for birds in flight. Looking forward to seeing more of your images with it!

    BrianW, make sure you take all things into consideration before you get that 100-400. The 400mm F5.6 is an incredibly sharp lens in comparison and the 100-400 acts like a big vacuum cleaner and sucks dust into your body due to the push-pull zoom. You will be fighting dust on you sensor constantly. The 100-400 is a great lens, but if it were me I would take Rays lens. Sure wish canon would come out with a 100-400 or 200-400 in a twist zoom.
    US Air Force - retired and Wildlife photographer

    To follow my photography adventures check out my facebook page

  7. #7
    Member tull777's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska
    Posts
    825

    Default

    Well done Ray! Man, you are no doubt going to be happy with that lens!

    http://www.pbase.com/tull777

    http://www.eddiefisherphoto.com/


    "If you're too open-minded, your brains will fall out. ....."Tight Lines & Best Fishes"

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    Thanks all for the nice comments.

    About the ravens: these are incredibly smart birds as told above. Over at the place where I took the photo, there were a couple of regular "dumpster divers" that are well-know to the ravens. This couple (man and woman), could almost touch the ravens before they would fly away, while I could only get around 50 feet from them.

    The lens: I have heard about the 100-400 sucking dust inside, not necessarily though the lens barrel, but from the camera's battery compartment in cameras such as the 10D and 20D which have no seals on the battery door. This should not be a problem for me, but it's something to think about if shooting around Chitina or any other place where there is a lot of dust in the air. But the main reasons for me to buy the 400mm f/5.6L are as follows:

    1. As long as there is enough light it focuses incredibly fast, and also because it does not cost as much as the 100-400. I don't mind at all not having IS, and it's not much larger and heavier than the 100-400. I paid $1,140 for mine at B&H, while the 100-400 costs around $1,400.

    2. I prefer primes to zooms because the slightly better sharpness they produce. I already have the 100mm Macro USM, the 200mm f2.8L USM, and now the 400mm f/5.6L USM. For my type of photography under good lighting, I don't need the added expense of IS in my lenses. In fact, since so many people are jumping at the IS lenses, that leaves a door open for me to buy some excellent non-IS primes and save some cash.

  9. #9

    Default

    I just bought the same lens and the 1.4X converter a couple of weeks ago. Been having fun getting to know it, though I'm much more used to zooms and find myself trying to re-frame on the fly--no can do with prime lens! Hope you're enjoying your's as much as I am mine...





  10. #10
    Member Hunt'N'Photos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, Alaska
    Posts
    1,210

    Default

    Welcome akpfeiff,
    Nice images as well. That is a sweet lens. I think you will both enjoy it!
    US Air Force - retired and Wildlife photographer

    To follow my photography adventures check out my facebook page

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    akpfeiff,

    Those are two beautiful images with amazing colors. Which computer program did you precess them with?

  12. #12
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Those are just great shots ! I am so torn as to which prime to get....the 300 mm IS f4 L or the one you have . I figure I would always be using a tripod so the IS would very seldom be used. And I figure if there is an eagle in a tree it should be light enough with the 400 and lower f stop to do the job. I have the Canon EF 135 mm f2 L lens, and I just love it. I call it my moose lens...at 80 feet his whole body fills the frame. It is just such a sharp lens, I think I would feel let down with a zoom. I was a dummy and bought the 2X teleconverter, which I don't like. I need to get a 1.4 with which ever new lens I get. I have the 50 mm f 1.4 and have a lot of fun with it. This winter I have scouted out 8 eagle nests along the Knik river where I live. I am getting excited as spring nears to see if any pairs come back to nest. This seems like a great forum to learn from. Please post more of your shots.....it really gets my energy level up, wanting to get out there ! About 2 months ago there were 3 eagles and a raven in a big old cottonwood by the Mat bridge, I got some nice shots....but it was just too grey out. I am learning that light is everything ! Anymore when I see an animal, I look at which way to approach him as to where the light is. If there is no light I just sigh and move on. Spring is coming and the glorious light with it
    ~ laura

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    Kenko 1.4x teleconverter is a very nice one, and does not cost as much as Canon's. The 400mm f/5.6L is about the same size and weight as the 100-400 IS. I have the 200mm f/2.8 USM, so I skipped the 300mm prime and bought the 400mm one, since I can use a 1.4x teleconverter with the 200mm lens.

    This is perhaps the most informative web site for Canon lenses, teleconverters, and tubes. You will have to look around until you find the right page, but can start here:
    http://photography-on-the.net/forum/...splay.php?f=33

    Lenses:
    http://photography-on-the.net/forum/...d.php?t=141406

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    8

    Smile

    I will look into the Kenko 1.4. I bought their set of 3 extention tubes but have yet to try them. I am wanting to try some of the set ups that Bryan Peterson does in his books....like making rain at 1/60....but my hoses are still froze up and I pump from a creek....so just have another week or 2 for the ice to crack open. I am hoping they work great with the 50 mm.
    Thanks for the site !

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by H20girl View Post
    I will look into the Kenko 1.4. I bought their set of 3 extention tubes but have yet to try them. I am wanting to try some of the set ups that Bryan Peterson does in his books....like making rain at 1/60....but my hoses are still froze up and I pump from a creek....so just have another week or 2 for the ice to crack open. I am hoping they work great with the 50 mm.
    Thanks for the site !
    I forgot to mention that some of the zooms, for example, the EF 100-400mm may not autofocus with a teleconverter. The same for the EF 400mm I have. But I can tape the last three contacts on the teleconverter, and this makes it possible to autofocus.
    http://www.michaelfurtman.com/taping_the_pins.htm

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RayfromAK View Post
    akpfeiff,

    Those are two beautiful images with amazing colors. Which computer program did you precess them with?
    \
    Hey Ray,

    I use an iMac and Photoshop for processing. Both of these have a little bit of post-processing (levels, hue and saturation, a bit of sharpening.) THanks for the tip on taping ther pins--will have to try that!

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akpfeiff View Post
    \
    Hey Ray,

    I use an iMac and Photoshop for processing. Both of these have a little bit of post-processing (levels, hue and saturation, a bit of sharpening.) THanks for the tip on taping ther pins--will have to try that!
    You are welcome. Do you use the full version of PhotoShop (CS4), or just Elements? I use PSE6 for the Mac.

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RayfromAK View Post
    You are welcome. Do you use the full version of PhotoShop (CS4), or just Elements? I use PSE6 for the Mac.
    I use CS3--haven't seen Elements so I can't really compare what's missing. I do know, however, that CS3 can do a WHOLE lot more than what I'm using it for. I mostly tweak levels, shadows/highlights, saturation, sharpness, sometimes I'll do color burns on the sky or other selected areas...

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akpfeiff View Post
    I use CS3--haven't seen Elements so I can't really compare what's missing. I do know, however, that CS3 can do a WHOLE lot more than what I'm using it for. I mostly tweak levels, shadows/highlights, saturation, sharpness, sometimes I'll do color burns on the sky or other selected areas...
    Thank you for explaining.

    Ray

  20. #20

    Default

    Well, the ice has been broken, and other pictures have been posted on this thread.

    Makes sense, given the "learning about long shots" theme.

    So here's one I got today using a Canon 70-200mm f/2.8 IS and a Canon 2x teleconverter....



    Not 'pixel peeking' perfect, but it'll do until I get a real 400mm.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •