Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24

Thread: Anchoring and Icebergs don't mix...

  1. #1

    Wink Anchoring and Icebergs don't mix...

    A relative tells this story, it's just something to store in the back of the safety side of your brain as we begin another boating season;
    His buddies were walking back to the beach after hunting, they watched an iceberg drift into the anchor line of there boat, push the boat completely down, bow first, and proceed to completely drift right over the top of the boat as it disappeared into the abyss. The END.
    I have been up west by the glaciers sight seeing, and on the way back there was an iceberg twice the size of my boat that magically appeared. We didn't see it on the way into the area, where did it come from? I have a photo of it I need to post.
    DON'T ANCHOR OR MESS AROUND NEAR THE ICE, GET YOUR ICE FOR YOUR BEER AND MOVE ON!

  2. #2
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Idaho/Valdez
    Posts
    980

    Default Makes sense

    Now about that ice for the beer (or Scotch, Pete!): is there danger approaching an iceberg to hack off some ice? I've heard to never get out on one, seems someone did to get their picture taken and the thing rolled over on him.

    So...how do you judge a safe iceberg? do you just approach the little ones? How big is little?

    I'd like to try that glacial ice, but don't want to take any risks!

  3. #3

    Question Mysterious iceberg

    This monster was not in our path when we came in, when we turned around to head back there it was. Kind of weird since all the other ice floating around wasn't moving around like it was in a river or something. Do they pop up from the bottom or flip exposing a huge top?
    (Brother-in-law in his C-Dory in the background.)
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,292

    Default Bergs

    Yes they can roll. The large one that appeared probably was mostly under water when passed, a piece might have broke off one end or something causing the heavier side to sink and lighter side rise. Even though that thing is huge!

    As for getting on or approaching. Don't get on! For approaching, usually only 10% is above water! Just have a lookout on the bow.

    In the pic is my dad. When family was watching the video my mom about killed him! Then a few moments later I put the boat's bow up to the berg. Got it moving. Let it drift from the boat. It split and then rolled! My mom came unglued when she saw that! Like I said, she almost killed him! Prety funny to watch their faces. But after it split and rolled, we all realized how stupid it was. But you can't talk my dad or I out of something once we have an idea. THAT WAS HIS IDEA!
    Last edited by akrstabout; 08-27-2009 at 22:54.

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    230

    Default Small pieces preferred

    My favorite method to "bag" some ice cubes is to scout around the bay and find a piece thats clear with no sand or rocks or gray color, small enough to capture in my landing net. You usually can't lift them into the boat with the net (without breaking the net), but this gives me control to pull it up along side and either pull it over the side, of if too heavy, whack a few times down to size.
    When in the boat, a screwdriver works great for carving pieces that fit perfectly in your cooler. My wife had me out in the garage freezer just the other day making small pieces of ice out of big ones still left from last summer. It is really unique, and seems to taste great in your favorite drink. Also love listening to the snap, crackle, and pop of 10,000 year old air bubbles.Its a great reminder of all the wonders of the Sound through the dark times.

  6. #6
    Member bhollis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    255

    Default

    I used that think that the glacial ice in Alaska was thousands of years old too. But it seems most of it's only around 100 years old or so.

    http://ak.water.usgs.gov/glaciology/FAQ.htm

    Scroll down to the section on myths.

  7. #7
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bhollis View Post
    I used that think that the glacial ice in Alaska was thousands of years old too. But it seems most of it's only around 100 years old or so.

    http://ak.water.usgs.gov/glaciology/FAQ.htm

    Scroll down to the section on myths.
    I will choose to be in denial on that! It still makes a drink taste so much better. It will last through a couple bourbons, scotchs, or what ever you pleasure might be. MMMMMM. See you in August, Ron.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  8. #8
    Member bhollis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    255

    Default

    I suppose we're all in denial about something or another. I know I'm in denial about how much this boating hobby of mine is actually costing me.

  9. #9

    Default 1979 Flipped

    In 1979 there was 4 of us go out in the PWS to Blackstone, one Zodiac guy wanted a better photo so he went up way close, maybe 50 yards from the face. Hard to judge since we stayed 1/4 mile back. Well a chunk the size of a house broke off, flipped him over like a pancake.
    Well now we got to go in and save him, got him in the boat, a bit cooled off, but had a Mustang full body coveralls on, bet they saved him. Latched on to his Zodiac grabbed a couple close floating things and got out. Lost all his gear, didn't do the old Merc any good.
    Dumb things don't always work out for the best.

  10. #10
    Member russiarulez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    202

    Default

    About disappearing icebergs. I usually go to the blackstone glacier when I have people that want to see glaciers when out on the boat.
    It is weird, but most of the time on the way to the glacier it is very hard to see the clear chunks of ice/small icebergs and it doesn't look like there are many of them far from the glacier.
    But when you turn around and head back, all the little chunks of ice pop up and are very easy to see. Sometimes I'm surprised at how many there are on the way back. I think it has to do with how they reflect light and the location of the sun.

  11. #11
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    SE Alaska-Summer Columbia River-Winter
    Posts
    2,007

    Default Blackstone

    I go to Blackstone to get ice for my fish cooler and drink cooler.

    It fizzes as it melts and I tell the Admiral that it is only 10,000 year old dinosaur farts!

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  12. #12
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Idaho/Valdez
    Posts
    980

    Default I guess 100 years isn't old to some of us...

    but I've heard that glacial ice is very dense, and will last way longer than "store" ice, or block ice you make in your own freezer...what about that?

    How many of you have ruined a good filet knife using it to chunk glacial ice, or stabbed a hole in your cooler?

    Pete, that's a roger. I should have plenty of opportunities to gather blue ice for that encounter!

  13. #13
    Member bhollis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    255

    Default

    Hate to be the one popping everyone's 10,000-year-old bubbles here, but, hey, I'm just the messenger.

    According the the USGS FAQ I linked to above, glacial ice is no denser than regular ice. On the bright side, though, it does melt a little slower. Has to do with the larger size of the crystals in glacial ice.

  14. #14
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bhollis View Post
    Hate to be the one popping everyone's 10,000-year-old bubbles here, but, hey, I'm just the messenger.
    Darn that Al Gore!
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,085

    Default remember

    Just remember, only about 1/10 of an iceberg sticks out of the water. It's possible that you went by this berg and didn't notice it because a flat side was up. As the ice melts, it changes the center of gravity and they will roll. Possibly this one rolled and the side sticking up was higher and more noticeable than the side that was previously up. The previous side might have been wider and lower to the water.

  16. #16

    Default

    Hockey rink ice is very dense due to it's light wetting/layering over and over when it is first flooded. If you just 'flood' the rink without layering, it will be full of air pockets and not dense enough to support the skates, it just breaks up. Frozen water or ice can only get compressed so much, dense glacier ice just doesn't contain much air. One things for sure...it's cold.

  17. #17
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Idaho/Valdez
    Posts
    980

    Default Hmmmm.......

    First, sorry for stealing this thread topic from anchoring danger near icebergs to using icebergs in the cooler and drinks

    So, I was thinking that glacier ice was denser because it was under all that pressure from tons of ice etc. on top of it before AG melted it with GW. But, duh, water doesn't compress so I guess the weight could only compress the air bubbles....which there are a lot of in most regular ice especially that "party ice" you get in the grocery store. So, I still think glacial ice is a little denser, and like you say colder too.

    Guess I'll steer this thread even farther astray: EZFreeze in Valdez sells salt ice that they say the commercial fleet uses because it lasts longer even though it is crushed. Tried it and it seemed to last maybe 20% longer than regular crushed ice, not as long as a block...what do you think?

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    260

    Default Yes = Salt Ice Is Colder

    It's a proven fact that ice with salt in it will be colder than normal ice. That's the reason you add salt to the ice in a portable ice cream maker.
    How stupid is it to be wasting tons of salmon and halibut as bycatch in the Bering Sea and then have the coastal villages hollaring they have no food? It's got to stop!

  19. #19
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akfishnut View Post
    It's a proven fact that ice with salt in it will be colder than normal ice. That's the reason you add salt to the ice in a portable ice cream maker.

    I don't believe that the ice itself has salt in it. Glacial ice is originates from fresh water I believe. You are correct that salt lowers the freezing point of water. That is how you get the cream to freeze in ice cream makers.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  20. #20
    Member akriverrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Chugiak, Alaska, United States, United States
    Posts
    754

    Default

    you guys are terrible . start a new thread! some how icebergs and anchoring, and the best ice to make you DRINKS do NOT belong in the same thread .

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •