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Thread: Anyone In The Lower 48 Take Fish Back On Dry Ice?

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    Default Anyone In The Lower 48 Take Fish Back On Dry Ice?

    We're planing a trip to AK and going to catch a few Halibut and would like to know if anyone in the lower 48 have brought fish back on dry ice in their vehicle? I imagine one can get dry ice here and there on the road and thru Canada but at what success? I had a friend that took a freezer with him and plugged it in every chance he got and arrived here in Okloahoma with fish in good shape but I don't want to haul a freezer to AK. So, anyone brought any fish back on dry ice in their pickup?

  2. #2
    Member akriverrat's Avatar
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    havent heard of anyone doing it but if sealed airtight in a foam box fish can stay frozen for a couple days. it can be done. you can get dry ice at sagaya in anchorage.

  3. #3

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    I never have bought dry ice, but I have brought those smallish blue 5 day Igloo coolers of vacume packed frozen fish to the lower 48 to share with family while there. It doesn't seem matter how much I bring as my family has a huge appetite for Alaskan Salmon right off the BBQ. But anyway, I only open the cooler every couple of days (just to check) and everything is always still pretty much frozen after a 5-7 day trip. If you freeze it and then pack a decent cooler with ice, it will stay frozen for a long time if you are not going in and out of the cooler.

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    Quote Originally Posted by T.R. Bauer View Post
    I never have bought dry ice, but I have brought those smallish blue 5 day Igloo coolers of vacume packed frozen fish to the lower 48 to share with family while there. It doesn't seem matter how much I bring as my family has a huge appetite for Alaskan Salmon right off the BBQ. But anyway, I only open the cooler every couple of days (just to check) and everything is always still pretty much frozen after a 5-7 day trip. If you freeze it and then pack a decent cooler with ice, it will stay frozen for a long time if you are not going in and out of the cooler.
    I think if the fish were frozen to around 15 degrees and then placed in a styrofoam container with the 10# ofdry ice (wrapped w/newspaper) and container taped, the fish should stay hard frozen for 3 days which I hope will be enough time to find another dry ice outlet. I think I can do it and avoid Fedex. Thanks.

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    Member akriverrat's Avatar
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    might be problems going over the border through canada with dry ice. im not for sure but its worth looking into.

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    Member NickofTime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by popaJuan View Post
    I think if the fish were frozen to around 15 degrees and then placed in a styrofoam container with the 10# ofdry ice (wrapped w/newspaper) and container taped, the fish should stay hard frozen for 3 days which I hope will be enough time to find another dry ice outlet. I think I can do it and avoid Fedex. Thanks.

    Gel packs baby, gel packs!

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    I don't think there are any problems bringing dry ice over the border.
    Now halibut that's a whole 'nuther ball game. The border guards are under strict orders to seize all halibut and forward it to me!!!!!!!

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    Default Bringing back fish

    My wife and I were in Alaska for our sons wedding and got caught after 9/11. We finally bought a car adrove home. We had a large cooler and after freezing our fish, packed it, and placed a coule hunks of dry ice on top. We drove home to SW Washington (one week) and had 1 package that was thawed enough we had to eat and the rest was still like a rock. Dry ice is available at all Wal-Marts and also several other locations. We still had ice left when we got home.

    Use a good quality ice chest, have your fish frozen solid, and pack dry ice in the cooler and you should be fine. Just check it every coupe of days. I'm thinking we wrapped our ice in a towel but can't remember for sure. Wife just corrected me, we wrapped out ice in newspaper.

    Hope this helps.

  9. #9

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    I've driven through the border where they unpacked the whole cooler to inspect. Must have had it open for over 15 minutes. They talked about opening some of the packages but wound up not doing that after all was said and done. I'd just put it on a plane as air freight and send it to someone I knew and pick it up when I got there if I was to do it again.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskan Fly Guy View Post
    I've driven through the border where they unpacked the whole cooler to inspect. Must have had it open for over 15 minutes. They talked about opening some of the packages but wound up not doing that after all was said and done. I'd just put it on a plane as air freight and send it to someone I knew and pick it up when I got there if I was to do it again.
    Sad part abut this is neither the wife nor I have anyone that could be trusted to be home to accept the frozen fish. Seems to me that between us opening and checking the fish and the Canadian Customs checking the fish it'd be an exercise in futility to try and maintain the fish until we got home. I figured customs would be more understanding. But I guess more dry ice could be picked up after entering a major Canadian city.

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    You can get some of the freezing companys to hold your fish and ship them after you are home. Just another option to look into. I do know that if you fedex with dry ice it will cost you twice as much.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Member fishnngrinn's Avatar
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    freeze fillets in zip lock bags with just enough water to cover the fillet, squeeze out all the air. When frozen they stack evenly, will keep indefinitely w/o freezer burn.
    NRA Lifetime Member

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    Member NewMoon's Avatar
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    What Skeeter225 said: a good cooler with dry ice on the top lasts quite a while.
    Richard Cook
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    "Cruising in a Big Way"

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by garnede View Post

    You can get some of the freezing companys to hold your fish and ship them after you are home.

    .

    This is what I would do. Lots of processors around and they will filet, freeze, box, and ship it all back home for you. Not cheap, but neither are coolers, ice, extra gas used, etc... Not to mention the headache and worry of getting your catch back home fresh.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Default restaurants/hotels

    While traveling cross country - stop at hotels near or with restaurants and see if the night manager will stick your cooler in their deep freeze overnight. You could keep it taped up if any sticky hands are around.

    Good luck

  16. #16

    Talking Dumb

    Quote Originally Posted by NickofTime View Post
    Gel packs baby, gel packs!
    I dont know where some get this stuff.Gel packs are great for fish and thigs that have not been frozen that you want to keep cold...But put with frozen fish in a cooler they do no good at all...they are just weight they thaw at the same rate as the fish ..I would much rather put the weight of frozen fish in instead

    Dry ice works well
    Last edited by Robert2968; 04-13-2009 at 17:28. Reason: needed

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default water on fillets

    Oooh - just say NO.

    I don't let any fresh water touch the meat of my fillets...no way that I would soak them in water. I have froze them and then sprayed them with water to give them a little coat for freezer burn protection - but it is a lot of work.

  18. #18
    Member NickofTime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert2968 View Post
    I dont know where some get this stuff.Gel packs are great for fish and thigs that have not been frozen that you want to keep cold...But put with frozen fish in a cooler they do no good at all...they are just weight they thaw at the same rate as the fish ..I would much rather put the weight of frozen fish in instead

    Dry ice works well
    Unless you're transporting it in your car, dry ice is prohibited by the airlines. Gel packs added to your frozen fillets really helps slow down the thawing process! You can pick up gel-packs at most grocery stores. Also, in a pinch, most drug stores / pharmacies have a slew of them which are often thrown away....they generally receive the majority of their bulk medications from pharmaceutical companies this way. I bet if you just ask, they'd probably give 'em to you for free...

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    Default freezer

    I take a freezer 9.9 cu ft. in the back of my p/u with topper, it will hold about 400# of fillet fish. At the campsite we keep the freezer plugged in and clean fillet and freeze the catch ea. day. I installed a 110 volt power inverter in my truck and when i leave home will freeze the food we want to take and even 3 gals. of ice cream, and as we use the food we fill the freezer with fish and shrimp to take back home to il. We run the freezer when we are driving and turn it off if we stop for the night. So i don't run the truck battery down when stopped. Most motels have outside 110 if you want to plug it in. I kept the freezer at or below zero for 4 weeks. We saved more on food than the freezer and invertor cost. hope this info helps. john

  20. #20

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    Dry ice is NOT prohibited by airlines....my wife just brought up some venison packed in an ice chest with dry ice...they do limit the AMOUNT of dry ice you can use. However, I've taken many, many coolers of frozen halibut and salmon on airlines from Anchorage to Albuquerque, and stopped using dry ice a long time ago. 25+ pounds of frozen fish with any remaining space filled with crumpled paper or towels will keep itself frozen for a good 24 hours in a cooler.

    PapaJuan - if you choose to have a place keep your fish frozen and then send it on when you're home, you can dispense with both the dry ice AND any gel packs - they just aren't necessary. Most of the processing folks in Homer and Seward like to put in a couple of packs because they can charge you for them. But, at the temperatures they and other processors freeze at...all you need is a good load of frozen fish in a cooler or styrofoam-lined fish box, and you're good.
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

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