Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 39

Thread: Waiting for summer

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default Waiting for summer

    I am not too crazy about taking pictures of birds, except for birds of pray, but took a few to kill some time while I wait for summer



  2. #2

    Default

    How do you know when they're praying?

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kink Alaska surrounded by sled dog kennels, a fabulous view and lots of hunting.
    Posts
    383

    Default Nice photos - how to post larger photos?

    I can only see how to attach a small file - whats wrong with me?
    www.imageworkspub.com

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kink Alaska surrounded by sled dog kennels, a fabulous view and lots of hunting.
    Posts
    383

    Default Found the sticky on how to post photos.

    Now I know why I didnt do it before. another photo gallery to post to. ...

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianW View Post
    How do you know when they're praying?
    Opps! I screwed that one

  6. #6

    Default

    I love redpolls--just think they are good-looking birds! I had BUNCHES of them at my feeder during March, but they seem to have mostly disappeared now.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akpfeiff View Post
    I love redpolls--just think they are good-looking birds! I had BUNCHES of them at my feeder during March, but they seem to have mostly disappeared now.
    I still see a few in my backyard. I was plowing snow off the deck yesterday, and two of them flew-in and sat on a table about five feet from me. The dog was startled for a second or two before the birds flew away.

  8. #8
    Member tull777's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska
    Posts
    825

    Default

    Nice shots Ray! My wife and I took a drive up toward Matanuska Glacier today and ran into a bunch of birders checking out the Raptors who are on the return to the area.
    http://www.pbase.com/tull777

    http://www.eddiefisherphoto.com/


    "If you're too open-minded, your brains will fall out. ....."Tight Lines & Best Fishes"

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tull777 View Post
    Nice shots Ray! My wife and I took a drive up toward Matanuska Glacier today and ran into a bunch of birders checking out the Raptors who are on the return to the area.
    I have been looking for grouse, and haven't been able to get close to any. They stay hidden in the brush

    I was looking at the pictures of your wife, you, and a grouse, and was surprised that you could just grab it and hold it in your hands.

  10. #10
    Member tull777's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska
    Posts
    825

    Default

    The grouse was at Kincaid Park. I picked him up twice and could have held him longer but felt kind of guilty doing it. As a rule I don't like to get to close to the animals ...some times one just can't help it.

    http://www.pbase.com/tull777

    http://www.eddiefisherphoto.com/


    "If you're too open-minded, your brains will fall out. ....."Tight Lines & Best Fishes"

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    Still waiting for summer, but this is a good sign (willow pods or flowers):



  12. #12

    Default Southeast Skunk Cabbage

    Nice photos Ray. Skunk cabbage is the spring plant around here.





    There's a fine line between fishing and just standing on the shore like an idiot.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    Very nice photos, Olga.

    We still have a foot or two of snow in the backyard, on the South side, behind the house, and a few inches left in front, so all I can do is to take photos of willow

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    A couple more from today:


  15. #15

    Default Nice

    Wow Ray,

    These are great. Is it appropriate to as what lens-settings-set up you were shooting with? They are very nice.

    Bruce
    There's a fine line between fishing and just standing on the shore like an idiot.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    The camera is a Canon 40D, and the lens a Canon 100mm f/2.8 Macro, focused manually at nearly 12" from the subjects.

    I usually set the camera to aperture priority (Av), and open the lens from f/2.8 to f/4. The ISO is set around 100, and in the shade at 160, so the shutter speed is somewhere from a minimum of 250 to at least 500. All depends on how much light is available at the moment. Since this macro lens has a shallow depth-of-field, it provides for a very smooth bokeh when there is a clear zone between the subject and the background. In this case, the background is a row of willow trees about 20" away.

  17. #17

    Default Thanks

    Thanks for that Ray,

    I am just trying to get a better grip on using a macro lens. I appreciate you taking time to share.

    Bruce
    There's a fine line between fishing and just standing on the shore like an idiot.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by olga1913 View Post
    Thanks for that Ray,

    I am just trying to get a better grip on using a macro lens. I appreciate you taking time to share.

    Bruce
    Macro lens for flowers and such? The following helps quite a lot:

    1. Manual focusing, with the camera on a tripod. You can use any of the semi-auto modes (Av, P, Tv on Canon EOS) as well as manual (M).
    2. Dark backgrounds behind the subject, hopefully with a clearing between the subject and the background.
    3. If your camera has Live View, take advantage of it by checking the focusing accuracy through the screen (zoom-in to 10X).
    4. Avoid direct sunlight whenever you can. Overcast days, or in the shade, are best. Avoid snowy or white backgrounds, or busy backgrounds (a lot of branches).
    5. Figure with is the focusing limit of your macro lens, up close. For example, the Canon 100mm macro captures a one-to-one image at 12" of distance or so. It means that in a picture of a cent, the cent looks approximately of the same size as a penny on my hand at the same distance (12").

    Most Canon lenses have a manual (M) and autofocus (AF) switch, and also a very important switch: this one is a sort of proximity switch. For example, if I am shooting at closer ranges, then I leave the switch within that range, but if I am shooting past that range, then i switch to long range. What this does is to save the lens from trying to find the perfect focus from slightly ahead of you all the way out, or the other way around. To clarify: lets say that I am taking a long shot, and that the switch is set for long range. In this case, the lens rapidly focuses on the subject without having to waste the time to look for the same subject just ahead of me. It just bypasses the short range, and looks for the subject farther ahead.

  19. #19
    Member Floyd_Davidson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Barrow, Alaska
    Posts
    388

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by olga1913 View Post
    Thanks for that Ray,

    I am just trying to get a better grip on using a macro lens. I appreciate you taking time to share.

    Bruce
    Do a google search on "closeups nature john shaw", which will come up with reviews and listings for new/used copies of John Shaw's "Closeups in Nature" paperback published in 1987. You can no doubt get a new copy delivered for about $20. It's the best $20 you'll ever spend on photomacrography!

    Of course, since it was published in 1987, it only discusses film and techniques that relate to equipment available at that time. The basics have not changed, and it is relatively easy to adjust to cameras that can shoot at higher ISO's and have the other functionality that digital cameras do.

    Shaw's books are all well thought of, but this particular one is a real standout. It is, for example, the only book that I know of where a correct discussion suitable for both a reference and as a tutorial is provided for the use of extension tubes and telextenders as a pair (which one should be closest to the camera?).

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    Couple more from today:




Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •