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Thread: C-Dory boats

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008

    Default C-Dory boats

    Anyone using the c dory boats, what is your experience with these as far as rough water use and durability


  2. #2


    We bought a 99 C-Dory, 22' Cruiser recently. The primary reason we choose the C-Dory was because of reccomendations from many that it very seaworhty. It's other attributes were fuel economy, trailerability and all weather cabin. We have not had much opportunity to use it yet, but hope to very conservatively gain experience over time. I'm sure you will hear more from other experienced owners.

  3. #3
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006


    i had a 22 footer many years ago. had it for 4-5 years, sold it back 1992 or 3. guy i sold it still uses it. very seaworthy but 1 foot chop would beat you to peices. mine was flat bottom with wood slats on bottom so you could let it go high and dry. was small, not alot of range and was only 7 or 7.5 foot wide and would really rock when drifting for halibut. was great starter hard side boat for me when i moved from inflatables .....used those for 8-10 years.

  4. #4
    Member bhollis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007


    I know there are some avid C-Dory fans on this forum. Surprised they haven't chimed in.

    FWIW, I've never owned a C-Dory, but they seem to have a very good reputation. Flatter bottom gives them better fuel efficiency than a deep V, but doesn't handle chop as well. Or so I'm told . . .

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    May 2008


    Great boat. Although they are pretty rough in choppy water. With twin 40's I average 4.5 GPH @ 18-22 knots depending on the load and water conditions. Sleeps 3 easily and can fish 4 without much trouble. All in all a great value for the money. The wallas heater is a must have for AK. Like so many things you must choose your days (wx wise) for the best experience.

  6. #6


    Bought a 2007 tomcat last august and love it. 30+ mph in 3 foot chop. Your drink wont tip over The mono-hull c-dorys seem to be very popular, but we chose the cat for the ride and stability.

    You can get a lot of information at Its a forum devoted to strictly c-dorys, tons of info.

  7. #7
    Member NewMoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Holladay, UT


    The only water our 1991 CD22 cruiser didn't handle well was a short chop. If we tried to stay at normal planing speeds she'd rattle our teeth, because the bow is rounded rather than having a fine entry. OTOH, if we slowed to maybe 14 knots (pick the speed that works given the seas) she'd push through the chop more comfortably.

    In big seas she's really excellent - to a great extent because of that rounded bow. You just have to pick the right speed. We've been in 20-30 footers once, and 10+ footers several times, without taking a drop of green water over the bow.

    They're durable and very seaworthy. With a 90hp two-stroke our range was about 170 nautical miles at 3 nmpg. With a modern four stoke a CD22 would have plenty of range, and cruise very economically. We went all over Southeast AK in ours - great boat.
    Richard Cook
    New Moon (Bounty 257)
    "Cruising in a Big Way"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Kenai, AK


    We have a 2008 C Dory that we use primarily out of Homer. It has a Honda 90 and an 8 HP kicker. C Dories are really an excellent boat. The hull does handle rough water quite well, but you have to be willing to slow down. With trim tabs we usually run around 14 kts in choppy seas and 22 - 24 kts in calm seas.

    Are you planning to use the boat in Southeast AK? When we lived in Juneau we had a 1990 22' cruiser and found it to be a great boat for those waters. If the boat you're looking at doesn't already have trim tabs, I'd recommend getting them. They make a ton of difference in short chop. As 405guy pointed out, the Wallas heater is also worth getting.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2006

    Default T.R. Bauer gave me a great review a last year

    T.R. Bauer of this forum gave me a really nice detailed response to your same question last year (for a 22'). Here it is:


    What I really like:

    1.) It is extremely capable even in truly nasty seas. Often, I find myself being the only boat out of the bay in this boat's size range east or west of Seward unless it is really, really nice out.

    2.) It is very fuel efficient at 22-25 mph. My CD 22 with twin 45s burns only 3.5 -5 GPH depending on the conditions.

    3.) I personally think that the Wallas Stove (or a furnace of sorts) is a must have in Alaskan waters and I truly love having mine. Like many boats, you can order one with it.

    4.) It is light and easy to trailer. Mine weighs just a little less than 4500 pounds full or water, fuel, and a good amount of gear. This is actual weight on the trailer.

    5.) When compared to aluminum boats it is warmer. Aluminum boats are significantly colder than glass boats are unless they are insulated.

    6.) I love the hardtop, and I love having a cabin up here. It is a little on the small side, but it is only a 22 foot boat. I have had boats that have canvas covers before and they can be a nightmare with zippers failing, rolling this up, that down, messing with buttons, and replacing them every so often. You just don't have to mess with that with a CD 22.

    7.) Excellent support at the C-Brat site.

    8.) It is not a beer can boat....enough said....

    9.) Excellent resale value when compared to some other boats.

    Negatives (sort of) all boats have trade offs and compromise this and that.

    1.) While the hull design is very fuel efficient, it also is a flat bottom boat and you have to slow down more so than you do in other v-hull boats in steep chop. On the other hand, it doesn't rock, pitch, and roll nearly as much off of plane in conditions where you are just fishing, or the seas have gotten so bad that nobody is going fast - including the v-hulls. I often pass Sea Sports when the seas are truly nasty coming back to port. But, they always pass me going out in good conditions. It does however, ride like a luxury car when compared to the aluminum bow rider type of boats.

    2.) No head. But, what boat does in this size?

    3.) A little on the slow side. My top speed is only 33 mph in the best of conditions. But, the reality is that I never go that fast anyway as I really hate buying lots of gas.

    4.) No fish box- oh well. I large cooler fits very nicely in the back of the boat. A plus is that the cooler is easier to clean out.

    5.) Not self bailing. This is more of an annoyance than a safety issue. If you are taking that much water on you are in a heap of trouble and a self bailer will not save you in this situation. In fact, it may make matters worse. However, self bailing boats are easier to clean out if you leave your boat in the water at the marina as they drain out and away.

    4.) C-Dory boats are expensive when compared to many of their counterparts.

  10. #10
    Member smtdvm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Juneau, Alaska

    Default cdory

    We have a CD25 that we are happy with and use in S.E. Alaska. We haven't gotten into any touble with it yet, doing quite well in most of the boating season waters around here. I also have time in the CD22, around S.E. and PWS and they are similar in performance to the 25. I have been out on days in December when I saw five other boats out, all C-Dorys except for a single SeaSport. Check out for all the info you can ever use.

  11. #11
    Member breausaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006


    Bought a 22ft 07 in the fall of 07.

    We gave the Triple J a workout last summer, nearly 30 overnights on the hook-usually a different cove each time, about 200 hrs on the main, and over 1800 miles on the water; all in PWS.

    Go here and all your questions will be answered.
    07 C-Dory 25 Cruiser


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