Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Camping In Brown Bear Country

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Southwestern Michigan
    Posts
    26

    Default Camping In Brown Bear Country

    I just spent the last twenty minutes reading the 270 for Hunting Brown Bear thread and it got me thinking. Where do you guys stay the night when Brown or Grizzly Bear hunting? Are you spending the night out on a boat? Are you staying in a drop camp? I assume that you are not day hunting out of a lodge or town. I watched a show on the Outdoor Channel where they stayed in a drop camp while hunting interior grizzly bears and had their camp raided twice by black bears. I can't imagine the carnage that a Brown or Grizzly could do. I was camped in Michigans UP at a State Park on my way to my first black bear hunt this past September and woke up in the morning to find bear tracks within ten feet of my tent. Maybe my snoring kept the bear away! Have any of you Brown and Grizzly hunters ever had one in your camp at night or raid your camp during the day? Just curious. Thanks guys.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,637

    Default

    Unless Im at my main camp, I sleep in an open sided tent if possible (Tarp/stik thing...) anyhoo I piss all around my camp, cook about 50 feet from my tent near my Meats and grub box....I also keep a dog loose and a rifle ready, and I sleep comfortable like....

    Ive never had a Bear be a direct prolem, though they have passed by in the night, it was never up close or threatening.

    Have fun.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  3. #3
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    Keeping a clean camp and using common sense is #1.



    Check out the electric fence by www.udap.com

    I got one for our yearly Alaska float trips.

    4 lbs, runs on two D batteries, and packs to the size of a 2L soda bottle.

    Here are a few pictures from this past Sept in NW Alaska. Very special place








    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  4. #4
    Member marshall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Near Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    1,814

    Default

    Very nice set up.

  5. #5
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    Bears have a very keen sense of smell(just look at the size of their olfactory canal) and they prefer USDA raised non Alaskans. They can distinguish those that were not born and raised up here, from the locals. Me, I was born and raised here and sleep well at night when in the field. Seriously, if you keep a clean camp and use the gray matter between your ears, you will be fine 99+% of the time. Use an electric fence if you are so inclined. They seem to be the ticket, especially on float trips when you have that big rubber "chew toy" taking you down the river. Chances are the bugs will give you more problems than anything with four legs.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  6. #6

    Default

    If you are concerned use the electric fence as mentioned above. I finally caved & used one for the first time last year, but that was for the base camp that we left for days @ a time & no trees around???. Normally it is me, the nylon fabric, gun, EAR PLUGS, & my dog or hunting partner. The ear plugs are for the rain, things that go bump in the night, & the snoring SOB next to me. I have herd bears in the night, smelled them, & even had foot prints up close to the front door. I normally just yell out, " Hey Bear" a few times & roll back over & go to sleep. My dog or worried partner usually insures I have a good nights sleep. Pay back for snoring most of the night. Never had my stuff destroyed while away or @ the tent, but I could just be lucky?

  7. #7
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sportdog View Post
    I just spent the last twenty minutes reading the 270 for Hunting Brown Bear thread and it got me thinking. Where do you guys stay the night when Brown or Grizzly Bear hunting? Are you spending the night out on a boat? Are you staying in a drop camp? I assume that you are not day hunting out of a lodge or town. I watched a show on the Outdoor Channel where they stayed in a drop camp while hunting interior grizzly bears and had their camp raided twice by black bears. I can't imagine the carnage that a Brown or Grizzly could do. I was camped in Michigans UP at a State Park on my way to my first black bear hunt this past September and woke up in the morning to find bear tracks within ten feet of my tent. Maybe my snoring kept the bear away! Have any of you Brown and Grizzly hunters ever had one in your camp at night or raid your camp during the day? Just curious. Thanks guys.

    well in all reality ....



    IT IS ALL brown bear/ grizz / blackie country.. you have a greater chance seeing one down town Anchorage then you do out in the bush..

    the bears wander past us at home and in tents all the time...the one thing i will not do is camp with my girls or wife during THAT time of the month... growing up on the farm, i seen what the studs and uncut boars, rams, etc did when the girls feed during their periods.

    and still i am more worried about blackies then grizz any day.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  8. #8
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    The electric fence was a great piece of mine for me on Kodiak. Didn't have a single issue with bears and we broke all the clean camp rules because of some downright crappy weather.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  9. #9

    Default gun is close....

    I spend most of my nights in the bush in a big 12'x17' wall tent on a cot with a wood stove. A rifle leans against my cot. We will eat and cook in the tent if the weather is lousy. A remote controlled LED light hangs in a tree like a yard light and a small LED light turned on low is in the tent. Spring bear hunts are spent on the boat and we will sleep on it this fall for the Koykuk moose hunt. When I was younger I spent nights in a small nylon tent or my old L.L. Bean nylon lean-to that was open on the front and screened. It is similar in design to the old Whelan lean to. I really liked that set up. I am not very fond of the small nylon tents because there is no room in them. I know they are a needed and required item for most of the young, strong back packing hunters that roam Alaska every year. I used to be one of them and wish I could still do it like I used to. I also used to make a lean-to or A-frame out of tarps and sleep under it. Some times we just rolled the dice and slept out on the ground because we were to tired and lazy to put up the tent. That was ok except when the rain or bugs came. Never had a bear problem though I am sure they have passed close during the day and night. The more used to people they are the bigger the problem they are. I think the electric bear fence is a good idea and my wife has told me to get one. By the time a guy stuffs everything in a back pack he thinks he needs the weight adds up.

  10. #10
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Mean streets of Fairview
    Posts
    1,140

    Default

    WHENEVER possible, I carry a plastic bottle of Pine-Sol. Sprinkle it around camp and the pots clanking in the night are a thing of the past. No more bite marks on the boat. Learned from an elder in Naknek. They hate the smell. (ziplock the bottle or you may hate it too!)
    I used to pee around camp until one fall. Hiking in we passed a tree w/ claw marks 8-10' above the ground. Old Pedro pissed on the tree, thinking we are letting him know we are in country. 30 minutes down the trail we heard the God awfullest roar from that direction. All we talked about around the fire that night was how we really ticked that bear off and wondered when he was coming to camp.
    Live life and love it
    Love life and live it

  11. #11
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,457

    Default

    i guess i'm just askin' for it....but....

    i keep my food in my tent, cook in my tent, sleep in my tent, no electric fence and in 11 years of guiding, i've never had a bear touch my tent, had them walk right up against it and not stop, even when i've been gone for several days at at time they haven't touched it.
    only takes one bear to ruin your trip though....
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  12. #12
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    i guess i'm just askin' for it....but....

    i keep my food in my tent, cook in my tent, sleep in my tent, no electric fence and in 11 years of guiding, i've never had a bear touch my tent, had them walk right up against it and not stop, even when i've been gone for several days at at time they haven't touched it.
    only takes one bear to ruin your trip though....
    only bare that ruins my trips is my buddy bare in the creek... dam we Alaskan are WHITE!!!!!!!!!!!!! i hate seeing where that gy needs to loose those 50lbs from....
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    SW,Ak
    Posts
    182

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    i guess i'm just askin' for it....but....

    i keep my food in my tent, cook in my tent, sleep in my tent, no electric fence and in 11 years of guiding, i've never had a bear touch my tent, had them walk right up against it and not stop, even when i've been gone for several days at at time they haven't touched it.
    only takes one bear to ruin your trip though....

    A lot of the same here.
    Never had problems with the bears bothering the tent.
    But have had them take some ribs and a head from camp.
    We followed the tracks till we saw little paw prints then we got out of the brush.
    Grandma always told us to respect them and they will respect you.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    61

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Badriverman View Post
    But have had them take some ribs and a head from camp.
    We followed the tracks till we saw little paw prints then we got out of the brush.
    I am impressed. Not too many guys would still be in the mood for a hunt after a bear worked them over like that.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    SW,Ak
    Posts
    182

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Greenhead View Post
    I am impressed. Not too many guys would still be in the mood for a hunt after a bear worked them over like that.
    Good one
    Was moose ribs and head.

  16. #16
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    I aplaud on all of you being on the cautious side of things, however I slept out in the wilderness for almost 40 years now. Yes I have had them close,(real closeas a matter of fact), and yes I have had meat stolen from a kill that was butchered in camp. I treat bears, weather Black, or Grizz,with respect, and they do likewise with me. Yes it does raise the hairs on my neck, but after a few drinks, you learn to say the heck with them roll over and go to sleep.

    If you are afraid of them they will sence it just like a dog would, They are like a big teenager your afraid to comfront Because hes twice as big as you are.

    The reason I say this is more and more of you are afraid to go in the woods and have a good time. I have been with more people than I can count that did'nt get a good nights sleep, and it ruined thier next day out.

    Hey have a good time out there and don't worry about the small stuff, and just be ready for the unexpected, don't keep looking for what you expect or you won't get no sleep.

    I've never used a fence, and never felt like I had to have that kind of security. I keep my pistol at hand and sleep right nicely. The one time that a sow with 2 cubs came into the camp site with a whole moose boned out in front of the tent, brushed her nose against my forhead threw the tent fabric, I was concerned but just layed there and they left and did'nt do anything to the camp or the moose.

    Its bear storys guys that freak you out. Yes there is danger there, but most of it is caused by those that freak out.

    I sleep better out in the woods a lot more than when I'm in town.

  17. #17

    Default my contribution to the stories...

    September 2007, Elk hunting Idaho on the Continental Divide at 8000 ft in my nice cozy wall tent heated by wood stove and it's raining, snowing sleeting sideways. I'm told that's grizzly country but nothing like you guys deal with in Alaska. Since the weather is sooooo snotty I fix dinner inside the tent. Partner and I eat up, turn in after things are cleaned up. Partner is near deaf, needs his hearing aids to hear anything and does not sleep with the danged things in place. We're a good match since I snore like a danged chainsaw.

    1/2 hour after lights out I hear crunching around the tent, sniff, sniff, sniff near the corner we just cooked at. Then rrrriiiiippppp! Jumped off the cot, grabbed the hand axe from the small pile of wood, find the light. I can hear the hasty retreat in the snow. Partner never stirred a bit, I let him sleep while I stewed at my own stupidity and laziness for cooking inside the tent.

    Following morning I check out the damage. One swipe with a sharp claw cut me a 3 foot gash in the canvas. Cost me a half day of hunting while I sewed up the gash. Partner was a bit peaved at me for not waking him..... here's the pics:



    Yea though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for the shadow is mine and so is the valley. Thy Glock and thy M14 comfort me in days of civil unrest and terror

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    19

    Default I like bears - out of my camp!

    I have sure looked at those electric fences. Not for my camp, but for kill sites. These grizzly down here have little fear of man and come a runnin to gunshots. They are not hunted at all and they have figured out shots usually mean fresh meat, at the very least a gutpile. I shot at a big boar sheep hunting last year to scare him because he was walking into our camp and didn't know we were there. He was on the other side of the creek and couldn't hear us yelling at him and from my experience I don't think they see real well. It was getting dark and we were filtering water. It didn't really scare him but he detoured around our camp. He acted like he got shot at once a week or so. I would have had some good video as he was close but my cousin was so rattled that he didn't hit record on the camera (tho he turned it on) until the bear had went about 200 yards. Lots of the outfitters down here elk hunt pretty much exclusively off horses and don't hunt the evening hunt. They hunt morning and mid day. Too many problems with killing elk late and leaving it to get pack horses for the next morning. I think with a fence a guy could kill in the evening and fence it and come back and have something left in the morning, besides a bunch of fat bears. I know a Game and Fish guy that has tested those fences for research in the spring when the grizzly are congregated due to food availability and he said they work good. He put them around roadkills to test the fences. He said the bears don't like the shock and won't go over the fence. He said 3 foot is plenty high and they get hit a time or two and leave. It would help us down here if we could remove a few of the problem bears. The GF even wanted to hunt them and at least let the sportmen do it instead of them killing them all the time but the feds said, "thanks for your input but no." The nice thing about the grizzly down here is the gut hunters don't go where the bear are. It has removed a lot of people out of the field that are scared of them. I keep an immaculate camp and cook a couple hundred yards from the tent. I pretty much just eat freeze dried so I'm not really cooking and their easy to roll up and hang a weeks worth of food with little odor.

  19. #19

    Default

    We've always cooked in the tent and stored the food close by. Never any problems on Kodiak, but up north would have to move camp on some years if we stayed in one location too long.
    With most of these bear "issues" there is a pretty fine line between "prudence" and "paranoia".
    Joe (Ak)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •