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Thread: Jetcraft Discovery

  1. #1

    Default Jetcraft Discovery

    Does anyone out there own one of these boats or have experience in them? A good friend of mine has a 20 foot Searunner that just beats you to death in the chop and supposedly these are supposed to run a little better. I am in the market for a 20-22 soft top and some of these can be found at descent prices. How do they compare to the Hewescraft and other "Alaskan" favorites?

    Here is a link to the boat...

    http://www.jetcraftboats.com/our_boa...discovery.html

  2. #2
    Member Reel Friend's Avatar
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    Default Look at Wooldridge as well

    http://alaskaslist.com/1/posts/10_Tr...dge_Sport.html

    It's not my boat and I don't know anything about this particular one but this is a really good all-around boat. If I had the money this is what I'd be looking at. Hope this doesn't highjack your thread.

  3. #3
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    The Wooldridge is a nice boat, but there is a big diffrence between a 10 degree and 18 degree deadrise in the big water. If you plan to run it in the ocean the jetcraft would be a better choice..IMO

  4. #4

    Default Sport is marginal in small chop

    I own a Wooldridge 2000 Sport with OBJ.
    In a 2 foot chop I go 10 mph otherwise get pounded too hard.
    The jetcraft model you posted lists as "variable 18 degrees".
    The question is: what is the deadrise at the transom?

    The Sport is 10 degrees at the transom and 18 degrees at the bow.
    The 10 degree part runs 2/3 the length of the boat which not coincidentally is how much of the boat needs to be kept in the water (i.e. off step) to keep it from pounding in chop.

    Basically any boat with less than 14 degrees at the transom and along most of the bottom will probably pound hard when on step in lake or ocean chop. Having said all that, if you are prepared to go slow, you can do a lot with the Sport...........

  5. #5
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by titobandito View Post
    I own a Wooldridge 2000 Sport with OBJ.
    In a 2 foot chop I go 10 mph otherwise get pounded too hard.
    The jetcraft model you posted lists as "variable 18 degrees".
    The question is: what is the deadrise at the transom?

    The Sport is 10 degrees at the transom and 18 degrees at the bow.
    The 10 degree part runs 2/3 the length of the boat which not coincidentally is how much of the boat needs to be kept in the water (i.e. off step) to keep it from pounding in chop.

    Basically any boat with less than 14 degrees at the transom and along most of the bottom will probably pound hard when on step in lake or ocean chop. Having said all that, if you are prepared to go slow, you can do a lot with the Sport...........
    Generally variable deadrise means the hull has a least one or more deadrise angles at the transom and thruout the planing surface, typically the most deadrise is closest to the keel and then a change to a shallower deadrise as the hull fans out towards the chine. This is a true monohedron as the chines and keel remain parellel. Hard to explain but this link has a picture.

    http://www.tropicalboating.com/power...ull-angle.html

    I have heard a warped hull sometimes called variable, very few boat builders build hulls this way, they become very sensitive to "bow steering". Even a Wooldridge for example: the Sport or Extra plus has a 10 degree at the transom and a 15 or 18 at the bow. If you read it carefully it says 10 degree constant thru the planing surface, if you get down and examine one at eye level you can see the deadrise is consistence until it starts to curve up to form the bow. again a monohedron hull design.
    Yeah, I know its a rather long winded reply, and as you said if you want a decent ride you need at least 14 degrees of deadrise.........

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Geez, I just looked at the Wooldridge website and see they really dont clarify wether the Sport hull is 10 degrees constant thru thr planing surface??
    So having never looked at one up close, I really dont know. I didnt think that Wooldridge build any warped hull boats?

  7. #7

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    Akgramps, what is the trade off then? Will a boat with a 21 degree deadrise be less stable then a boat with a 18 deadrise? I spent several summers fishing with a friend in his 20 foot hewescraft searunner and it was just plain awful to ride in any kind of chop, I believe it had a 14 degree deadrise at the keel. So naturally, I would personally rather give up some stability for a better ride as it seems like we spend 50% of our time riding in the boat to whatever destination. What is the optimal deadrise for a smooth ride with descent stability?

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    Quote Originally Posted by futurerancher View Post
    Akgramps, what is the trade off then? Will a boat with a 21 degree deadrise be less stable then a boat with a 18 deadrise? I spent several summers fishing with a friend in his 20 foot hewescraft searunner and it was just plain awful to ride in any kind of chop, I believe it had a 14 degree deadrise at the keel. So naturally, I would personally rather give up some stability for a better ride as it seems like we spend 50% of our time riding in the boat to whatever destination. What is the optimal deadrise for a smooth ride with descent stability?
    Like so many other things in boating, I dont know if there is an exact answer to that question. It can depend on the lenght and width of the boat as well. also depends on if its fiberglass or aluminum. A fiberglass boat is typically heavier and therfore will frequently ride a little better. all other things being equal. It seems 18 degrees is a pretty fair compromise. I know one of the popular fiberglass boats, cant remember if it was Sea sport or Osprey, (and may have been another brand???) anyway some of the earlier models had considerable more d-rise than their current models, and have heard of folks complaining of the fact they are too tippy. I believe the d-rise was somewhere in the 20's???
    I really wish I had a better answer, and quite honestly my personal experience is rather limited, I was just clarifing the variable deadrise thing.
    I have a boat with a "warped hull" and so learned all this stuff trying to sort out some of its handling foibles............

  9. #9

    Default Jetcraft/Harbercraft

    I beleive the 18 deg "variable" deadrise means average. Certainly not at the transom. I owned 2 harbercrafts (17'-19') and now have a searunner (20'), and a searunner is much smoother. I am basing this on that Harbercraft and Jetcraft are one the same. The searunner has a 35 deg bow deadrise, 21 deg midship and 14 deg transom.
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  10. #10
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The general tradeoff in deadrise is a boat with more deadrise will go through the chop better, but will rock more at rest and they typically are less fuel efficient.

    But the deadrise issue isn't that simple, as hulls with deeper v's tend to be heavier, and the added weight has just as much to do with them blowing through chop, and sucking gas.

    In a nominal 20' skiff, you're going to have to slow down in chop to one degree or another, a few degrees of deadrise isn't going to make that much of a difference. If you reall want to go fast through the chop, consider a bigger heavier boat.

  11. #11
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    Default Variable deadrise

    I have an older Thompson with a very deep v but has three chines for a variable deadrise. That deep vee is a bit rougher on gas and the old beast is heavy but for the few extra gallons of gas I feel much safer when the chop gets up which can happen on the best of days.
    It's gonna come down to fuel vs comfort. If your limited to smoother flat water running go with a flatter deadrise and fly along saving gas. If you regularly encounter rougher water where you go (outgoing tide with incoming wind or viceversa) then get a deeper and longer hull. It may take more gas but you won't need to pay as much for blood pressure meds

  12. #12

    Default

    Sorry futurerancer, I dont have any experience with either boat. If the ocean is where you'll spend most your water time at. I'd go with more deadrise and weight or you'll really have to pick your days. Just sounds like your looking for alot of comfort when on the move. Just curious about the buddy with the searunner. Did he just go wide open or was he trying to make it a comfy ride.

  13. #13

    Default

    I don't know if there is a dealer in Anchorage, but if you are serious about getting a Jetcraft I suggest you try to test drive one. Nevertheless, I'll try to answer your question, because no other Jetcraft owners have chimed in....

    I have a 19' jetcraft Kingfisher model, which is similar to the newer 20' Discovery. I have a friend who has a 22 foot Searunner. Three extra feet is a big deal! The added space is nice and it's well built for fishing. His soft top is also nicer.

    However, I think my boat handles better, it turns on a dime (thanks to the pre-flexed hull and full length chines). I also think my boat handles the chop just as well as the Searunner (I can't wait for the reply's about this comment). For a combination family recreation / fishing boat, I think my boat does a great job. I am very happy with my boat, I would be surprised if you are disappointed with the Jeftcraft.

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