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Thread: Ship Creek King Fishing

  1. #1

    Default Ship Creek King Fishing

    I've lived and fished in Alaska for 6 years now and have had great results, but I have never really focused on a tidally influenced area such as Ship or Bird Creek. My main reason has been the crowds and that stupid mud. This year, I want to King fish in Ship Creek. Can some experienced Ship Creek slayer give me the how to advice that I need? Some questions that come to mind are:

    1. Do I need to fish the incoming, outgoing, or slack tide and does it matter if high tide is earlier or later in the day?
    2. How large of a tide do I need to fish? Does a larger tide like a 20-30 foot tide push more fish into the creek?
    3. What presentation do I need to use? Roe and a bobber, roe and a spin and glow, big Vibrax, Fly?
    4. What area of the creek is my best bet for a fresh king? I know where the honey holes further upstream are from watching and listening to people talk.
    5. Historically, when do the Kings start entering the creek?

    Not trying to overwhelm anyone with my thirst for knowledge and I appreciate in advance any advice I can get. Here's hoping for good runs and tight lines this season!

  2. #2
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    It all depends on how you want to fish. Incoming and high tide plunk a corkie and eggs on the bottom and hang out, when there is current flip and rip russian style. Basically its fishable at any tide leval. Keep the hip boots and rod in the car and go down there when you can.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  3. #3
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    ak powder monkey said it all, and you have really summed it all of. All of the above will and can work. Best advice I could give for fish is to fish all the above, you need to put some time in to see what to use and where to use it but it seems that you already have a plan in place. I normally throw Vibrax on the lower part, row and a bobber from site of removed culverts to the former Bridge you could eat at and occasionally flip the upper part. The mud can be productive as well as all other methods, expect crowds, hugh tides, and if you are luck some Kings.

  4. #4
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    Default Leave the hip boots

    at home or you may be leaving them at the creek! Get a pair of chest waders for Ship.

    The kings will hold anywhere in the creek that has a decent size hole for them. The only thing that matters with the time of day for the tide is the type of fishing you want to do. Remember the creek is closed to fishing from 11pm to 6am all king season, and when they say 6am they mean 6am not 5:59am! If F&G enforcement is there they will issue tickets for this!

    The size of the tide only really effects what type of fishing technique and for how long. The really big tides(28' +) will allow any kings that are ready to go past the dam to do so without using the ladder.

    Low water, floss there gums is my suggestion. Incoming/outgoing (when there is a current just not a fast one) I would try the roe "catfishing" style. At slack tide try a vibrax. Of course it all depends on the fish you happen to get your hook in front of as to the best technique.

    The best way to get a fresh king is to keep fishing. There are always fresh ones coming in during season and now that the culverts are gone they have the run of the creek (up to the dm).

    Have caught them as early as mid April (warm early spring) but I would say the run usually starts around mid-may.

    Hope this helps. If you fish the creek I'm sure you'll see me and my buddies there. Be happy to help you get into the fish.

  5. #5
    Member arcticfox77's Avatar
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    Default this is what ive found works...

    when the tide is coming in ill use a bobber and roe. after the tide changes ill switch to a pixie with the rattles in it.i usually use a green one and it seems that exactly one hour after high tide the bite is on for about a half hour.

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    "Historically" that would be on/around Memorial Day. People will be out early early to get the bug out, but the kings still come on their schedule

    Honey holes? Well I've spent a number of years doing that creek and nothing beats finding one then naturalistic observations. I've always watched and then shoot the breeze with one's that are willing to talk, so I can get a "feel." Just make certain if there is a line up a folks who are chucking blades that your not trying to drift a bobber in front of a crowd.

    Get your tide book and spot check specific areas on the creek and see what's happening in early June and you ought to be able to get a better idea of how to be succesful at specific times in certain areas!

    When in doubt, set the hook!

  7. #7
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    If you fish before, during, and after high tide the mud isn't really a problem. Lots of spots you can wear normal shoes if you feel like it. Depends on when High tide is. I've found the 6am tides are great as not as many people.
    Low tides the mouth can be cool, but then there will be mud, and you need to be careful. Move back as it get higher, and eventually stake a spot by either before the culverts or after. I personally like the rip-rap after the railroad bridge. It's a popular spot though so good luck getting it.
    You'll notice that by the covered bridge there a lot of bait fishers, and then downstream to the railroad bridge it's hardware generally, and after the culverts is bait and then a mix of both on the mud plains. I'd say it's a nice to not fish bait in the hardware area and vice versa.

    Mainly just put in the time. I like Pixies with rattles, and big vibrax. for me that's it. Sometimes float a corkie and yarn in lower tides.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Airborne View Post
    I've lived and fished in Alaska for 6 years now and have had great results, but I have never really focused on a tidally influenced area such as Ship or Bird Creek. My main reason has been the crowds and that stupid mud. This year, I want to King fish in Ship Creek. Can some experienced Ship Creek slayer give me the how to advice that I need? Some questions that come to mind are:

    1. Do I need to fish the incoming, outgoing, or slack tide and does it matter if high tide is earlier or later in the day?
    2. How large of a tide do I need to fish? Does a larger tide like a 20-30 foot tide push more fish into the creek?
    3. What presentation do I need to use? Roe and a bobber, roe and a spin and glow, big Vibrax, Fly?
    4. What area of the creek is my best bet for a fresh king? I know where the honey holes further upstream are from watching and listening to people talk.
    5. Historically, when do the Kings start entering the creek?

    Not trying to overwhelm anyone with my thirst for knowledge and I appreciate in advance any advice I can get. Here's hoping for good runs and tight lines this season!

    I caught quite a few kings at Ship last year and here are a few of my observations. Like everyone says, floss at low tide and soak roe. I never fish up by the bridge prefering to stay more towards the mouth. I don't use roe that often. My most productive method is to throw a #5 pink vibrax with a bit of pink yarn draped over the hooks. I start fish about 2.5 hours before high tide and fish till about 3 hours after high tide. Most of the fish I have caught were within 1 hour either side of the high tide. The lower the peak tide the better. My best days were when the tides were between 20 and 28 feet. I never caught any fish when it was over 30 although I did see some caught but not as many as the lower tides. Time of day did not seem to matter although mornings might have been a little better.
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

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