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Thread: Canada and gunpowder

  1. #1
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    Default Canada and gunpowder

    Will Canada let you haul gunpowder and primers through the border? I have to go to the lower 48 for a training course, and I might get a small car while I'm there. Anybody done this?

  2. #2

    Default I would not attempt to haul powder and primers through Canada

    Just based on what I have read, and my own experiences in visiting Canada, I would say that any amount of gun related and explosive material is going to cause you lots of trouble.

    If you still want to try it, contact Canadian Customs directly on the phone, ask for specific info related to exactly what you want to bring into Canada, make sure to find out where to get the information in writing, and then carry the written legal stuff with you.

    Expect to be treated less than warmly at Customs, and very possibly with considerable delay.

    I personally wouldn't do it. The potential profit/savings from 100 pounds compared with shipping it is around $400 at best, and that is not enough money to get me to deal with angry suspicious bureacrats with guns and jail cells at their reach.

    Best Regards,
    Jim

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    To be honest, I have no idea what the law says regarding transporting powder and primers through Canada, but I've done it many times. I've never been asked about it by either Canadian or US customs. They quite often ask about guns, but never powder or anything else.

    Incidentally, I've found US customs to be more of a PITA than Canadian. Just my experience.

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    My experience with Canada has been good so far. We didn't bring guns across the border or anything like that because we expected to have problems. In reality, the gal at the border asked us about guns (and ammo) ...we said no, that we left our stuff with my Dad in Vancouver, WA. She said that we could've just shown up with it, filled out the pass at the border, and paid for the thing ($50?) and driven on through ...no problem, and she was quite friendly about it. I don't know the web site anymore, but their web site was accurate and easy to use. When we shipped our guns and ammo up here, we did it on Alaska Airlines and it was super easy ...just put them in a locked hard (cheap K-Mart) plastic case, declare them at the counter, then pick them up at the oversize-luggage door at your destination, just show your ID and they're back in your hands. The form was a one-liner ...simple shmimple.

    Brian

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    Well……… I just drove across the border in Lynden Washington to Abbotsford BC in February on business. No guns or anything like that with us, but judging by the way we were treated by Canadian Customs, you have though we on some sort of most wanted list…. Especially me! I avoided the full body cavity search, but pretty much got grilled about my police record and asked a thousand questions. I am here to tell you that it isn’t always easy to recall every city you have lived in over the last 20 years from memory while under scrutiny and pressure….. especially if you have moved around a bunch like I have. All of this stemmed from a misdemeanor conviction from the early 90’s for “loaded firearm in a motor vehicle” for which there was no jail time, and the fine and court cost had been paid for, over 16 years ago….. And it was interesting to me, that after clearing customs and immigration with nary a hiccup in more than 7 foreign countries over the last few years, that it would be CANADA that gave me the only grief…. Go figure?

    There is another lesson in this story somewhere…. Oh yea… if you live in a crappy neighborhood (Chino), in a very liberal state (California) and decide to carry concealed, contrary to the law, even though it is for your own personal protection, be prepared to pay the price for that decision if you ever get caught! And apparently….. they never forget and like to share their information!

    So as far as bringing powder and primers across the border…. You might be able to, and technically speaking, I might be able to, and I really haven’t a clue about the legalities of it, but like midnightsunfun said…. For me, even if it is perfectly legal, it would be WAY more hassle than it was worth. Actually…. It makes me feel a bit nauseous even thinking about it….
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

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    It's no big deal to bring powder, primers, or ammo through Canada. I think you are allowed 2000 rounds or components to make the same number if I remember correctly. So 3 or 4 pounds and 2K primers if you back it up with loading data for a magnum rifle, but no way you will get 50 or 100 pounds in.

    If you need more than that I would round it all up and take it to Lynden in Fife WA to ship it up as you drive your little car.

    Andy

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    That's good to know. Now if I can just find the Canadian publication governing that, I'll be in good shape. I want to have something printed covering it.

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    I cant find the amount online now. I would call the crossing I was using and ask them how much ammo/powder you can bring.


    http://canadaonline.about.com/gi/dyn...Fvisitin_e.asp

    Andy

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    Default Canada and powder

    We are leaving for a trip to the lower 48 and did some checking about bringing powder back. What customs told us was that there was no problem with bringing up to 8 lbs back. While that is not a whole lot it will help if we can find what we are looking for.
    As for waepons we have never had an issue coming or going with what we carried. Just declared them at the border and all was fine.
    However things do change and it always depends on the mood of the people at the crossing.

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    I did a quick search using the above website link and came up with the following:

    http://cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/pub/bsf5044-eng.pdf

    It lists the amount of primers and powder one is allowed to bring in on page 12.

    HTH

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    Thumbs up Thanks Blybrook, I could not find it last night.

    *5000 rounds of ammo, *5000 primers, *5000 primed brass. It's not clear if you may combine for a larger total but I think you can as they are each under their own bullet heading. Always best to ask beforehand.


    Propellants = 4 kilograms (8.81 lbs) smokeless powder, black powder in containers of 500 grams (1.10 lbs) or less for a combined total of 8 kilograms (17.66 lbs) of black powder.

    200 rounds duty free for hunting, 1500 for a shooting event, but it doesn’t say anything about transiting through Canada with it. Passing through is not importation so I don’t think the duty applies. I think it's all duty free for passing through, I declared that I had approximately 1800 rounds when I came up in 2000 and was not charged duty on anything.

    So looks like over 8 pounds of powder with 5000 primers for sure and maybe 5000 rounds of ammo and 5000 primed brass. As well as 8 one pound cans of black powder. Way more than I was thinking they would allow.

    Andy

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    Default Canada

    Canada is the only country in the world that has required me to leave - I've been welcomed everywhere else with no problems. Canada gave me three days to get out.

    No convictions ever anywhere for anything - they just didn't like my looks for some reason I guess. I was flying out the next morning anyway so I didn't care.

    I still have bunch of powder down south I'd like to bring up but probably isn't worth the effort to bring it through Canada. They may lock me up this time!
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    Quote Originally Posted by blybrook View Post
    I did a quick search using the above website link and came up with the following:

    http://cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/pub/bsf5044-eng.pdf

    It lists the amount of primers and powder one is allowed to bring in on page 12.

    HTH
    As I understand the page 12, it's talking about Canadian Citizens.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    As I understand the page 12, it's talking about Canadian Citizens.

    Smitty of the North
    It applies to both citizens and non, read all the way to first paragraph of page 13.

    "Within these limits, non-residents can import
    200 rounds duty free for hunting purposes, or up
    to 1,500 rounds duty free for use at a recognized

    competition."

    Andy

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    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    It applies to both citizens and non, read all the way to first paragraph of page 13.

    "Within these limits, non-residents can import
    200 rounds duty free for hunting purposes, or up
    to 1,500 rounds duty free for use at a recognized

    competition."

    Andy
    Thanks
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
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    The way I read it initially was for Canadian Citizens only, but found that it was for non-residents as well. If there are any main questions, you can call the listed group (National Resources Canada "NRCan") for detailed information. Their website was extremely confusing and the pdf I posted earlier was the best and most complete listing of what is approved.

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    By far the easiest way to bring something like powder/primers/ammo through canada is to bring it with a firearm. Once they know you have a firearm, they basically ignore the rest of your rig. Have your documentation on the up-and-up and off you go. Otherwise, if you dig deep enough on the canada customs webpage, you can find the info you need.

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    Default Canada - Gunpowder

    I recently checked with Environment Canada and you can import 8 kilograms of gunpowder and 5000 primers without an importation permit. I told them that I was an Alaska resident and that I was traveling from the U.S. to Alaska through Canada and that I would like to transport gunpowder. I haven't made the trip yet, but I am confident that the information given me is accurate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiak87 View Post
    I recently checked with Environment Canada and you can import 8 kilograms of gunpowder and 5000 primers without an importation permit. I told them that I was an Alaska resident and that I was traveling from the U.S. to Alaska through Canada and that I would like to transport gunpowder. I haven't made the trip yet, but I am confident that the information given me is accurate.
    The 8 kilograms limit is for black powder (in 500 gram or smaller cans) not smokeless powder! Smokeless powder limit is just 4 kilograms. You may get a person who has no clue that there is a difference, but I would not count on that. Go to that link blybrook posted and read page 12 & 13 carefully.

    http://cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/pub/bsf5044-eng.pdf

    Andy

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    Hello to all. Being from Canada.
    If you have in your possession 15 lbs of powder or more you can be charged under the explosives act. To buy powder here you have to sign for it, at some stores. Show your gun licence, and drivers licence

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