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Thread: Manual, lever-operated jack plate

  1. #1

    Default Manual, lever-operated jack plate

    I know, I know - I laughed too, but that’s what they’re called…

    I’m trying to find a specific type: not the fancy hydraulic type; not the type that requires tedious adjusting with a wrench and other tools. I’m looking for one that raises and lowers an mid-sized outboard with a manually-operated lever.

    The scenario: you cross open water and approach the shallows of a creek mouth. You slow down, push (or pull up) on a lever, and the jack plate assembly raises your outboard motor to where you want it to be. It must be stout enough to raise and lower a 40 hp motor.

    Where can I find one?

  2. #2
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    Default in my backyard?

    There are a couple of styles.
    1- the handle is mounted on the lift. You use mechanical advantage when you push down on the handle. This type of lift requires that you hold the handle until you want to lower the motor.
    2- the handle mounts to the boat floor. It pivots on a toothed "gear". The top of the handle has a lever you squeeze to release the latch at the bottom. You push the handle forward, lift the motor, let go of the lever, and the motor stays up.
    Generally most guys like the latter style. I may have the first one out back of the garage if I didn't already sell it. It is heavy duty and believe it will lift a 2-stroke 40hp.

  3. #3
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Default

    I had one that was made by Wooldridge, it must have been 30 years old.
    I used it on a 35 Johnson that was on a 16 foot jon boat.
    It had a prop lower unit and it worked great, it bolted to the transom and moved the motor back about a foot. Essentially it was two parallel arms that would keep the motor parallel to the transom. When properly set up it was well balanced and very neutral.
    It had a long wooden handle to lower or raise the motor, when traversing a shallow section the motor would just ride up and then you could push it back down once past the shallows.
    Mike at that Boat Shop in Fairbanks may be able to hook you up.
    I will look for a photo of the lift....

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