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Thread: Kanektok River Float 8/17 - 8/27

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    Default Kanektok River Float 8/17 - 8/27

    In August I will be doing my first float on the Kanektok and I was wondering if someone could give me some advice as to what type of flies to tie for this trip.
    I have been tying flash flies, bunny flies and spankers in pink for the silvers. How about flies for char, grayling and rainbows. What would you recommend? I just purchased an "alaska collection" of beads from trout beads. Any general advice would be appreciated.

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    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default Silver run

    I have done this float in the fall, and you are going to have plenty of Silvers in the river system at that time.
    these rainbows and dolly are used to eggs, so those are going to do well.
    I have not had success at any dry flies , but I did not try for long at all,,
    The streamers worked on the silvers no problem.
    The fishing was so good when I was there, that patterns were not really something I thought made much difference.
    I used purple and black leaches, and some standard flashy streamers..
    I used the bead up above the hook for the Rainbows.... and that is what I am used to on the kenai,, so .. well,,thats what I did,,,
    Sorry not much help here... I was on the sticks and I like to cook, so I spent more time doing that than fishing, but my group just hammered them with lots of different stuff,,
    seemed like the Eggs though were always in demand..

    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  3. #3

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    I'm going to be fishing the Kenai Peninsula during that same time, and I've been getting info on this for months so I think I have a pretty good idea now. BEADS if your fishing rainbows and Dolly's. Look for spawning salmon and you'll find them just down stream feeding on eggs (that is supposing they are dropping.) Everyone has their favorite bead recipe just check past posts on beads and you'll get an idea of what most people like. As for streamers for trout and Dolly's; egg sucking leech's bunny style, wolly buggers, dolly llama's, and sculpin patterns. For salmon I've done about the same as you. Plenty of pink, flashy stuff for the silvers. I've also been told to not overlook chartruse, and white. I think a mix of white/pink or white/green would be good. Check out alaskaflyfishinggoods.com and reserach the Alaska fish tab, it gives great info on each species and what flies they prefer most. I've also been told that it won't hurt to have some standard nyphs also just in case.I hope this helps. I'm sure your just as excited as I am, Cant wait!!

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    Default

    I'd reccomend ESLs for cohos
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by silentrunner View Post
    In August I will be doing my first float on the Kanektok and I was wondering if someone could give me some advice as to what type of flies to tie for this trip.
    I have been tying flash flies, bunny flies and spankers in pink for the silvers. How about flies for char, grayling and rainbows. What would you recommend? I just purchased an "alaska collection" of beads from trout beads. Any general advice would be appreciated.
    I was there last year, that same time:

    grayling/dollies: egg patterns - 8-12 mm (yes up to twelve); orange, pink, usual color mix.

    rainbows: It was either fleshflies, which the guides use almost exclusively, or mice (moorish and mercer's lemming patterns); I got no bows on eggs - wouldn't depend on them at this location. Bring a collection of fleshflies and mice is my recc. Bows were not easy to get a strike at the kanektok relative to other species.

    silvers: you will need some dark colors also; simple, dark leech and ESL patterns (purples, blacks) strangely worked best for me there - not the usual bright pinks and greens - even though I tried like hell on these also; just don't short yourself on dark stuff - bring a variety. Flashflies in silver or purple and some things with purple flash also worked.

  6. #6

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    Already been said, but I'll reiterate: for rainbows and char that time of year, you'll need flesh flies and beads. I like articulated flesh flies. Think about decaying salmon, and make the flies in at least 3 colors: dirty sock, a faded pink/peach, and a dull orange. Two-toned rabbit fur is cool. Try to tie some of them "steak and eggs" with a bead, too.

    Good ideas here:

    Look at the Moal Rhoid, Barely Legal

    http://www.alaskaflyfishinggoods.com...-products.html

    For grayling, bring some dries that emphasize buoyancy and durability. Olive elk-hair caddis, Irrisistable, small gray Wulffs are good. Also a handful of nymphs, and - my favorite - some smallish (size 8) purple egg sucking leeches. Most of your grayling fishing will be in the headwaters. Although present throughout the river, as you move downstream you'll probably start targeting 'bows, char, and cohos. When chasing rainbows, I often keep the e.s.leech on my fly patch; if I spot some big grayling (usually in a slack-water pool or cut bank), I'll put on the leech and catch a couple.

  7. #7

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    well - I got grayling all the way down; even though I'd thought like tsiutoo that they would be mostly in headwaters, they weren't; so keep a rod in the water with a globug on the end while you are drifting.

  8. #8

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    Yes, to clear up any misunderstanding: grayling are "present throughout the river" (see my post above). But grayling tend to be the target species in the headwaters because the fishing for char, rainbows, and salmon doesn't come really come into it's own until you move downriver a ways.

    In my mind, that's the real beauty of fishing the streams of Western AK; once you reach the middle sections of river, there are so many quality fish to target. Want to catch a gorgeous grayling? - go for it. Want to get a char for lunch? - they're there, all right. Want to try skating a mouse for rainbows? - Why not? Feel like getting your arm wrenched off by the big pull of a salmon? - Yee ha!

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tsiutoo View Post

    Good ideas here:

    Look at the Moal Rhoid, Barely Legal

    http://www.alaskaflyfishinggoods.com...-products.html


    +1 on Alaskaflyfishinggoods.

    Those guys are awesome.

    Best flies I have ever bought. That Moal Rhoid is pretty awesome looking. Their egg sucking "hareball" leech in purple/pink was the best fly I have ever used on trophy dollies. Well tied stuff and long lasting.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  10. #10

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    Just a suggestion for your E.S. Leeches and other wooly bugger-type ties: as a last step, after winding on the palmered hackle, I wind on a piece of Kevlar thread as "ribbing", in a counter-direction that I wound the hackle. Use a bodkin to help pick out any hackle barbs that you inadvertently pin down.

    This small step adds a lot of durability to the fly because the first thing to fail is usually the hackle - it breaks and unwinds. The kevlar is easy to work with, and very tough. Guaranteed to greatly extend the life of the fly.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tsiutoo View Post
    Yes, to clear up any misunderstanding: grayling are "present throughout the river" (see my post above). But grayling tend to be the target species in the headwaters because the fishing for char, rainbows, and salmon doesn't come really come into it's own until you move downriver a ways.

    In my mind, that's the real beauty of fishing the streams of Western AK; once you reach the middle sections of river, there are so many quality fish to target. Want to catch a gorgeous grayling? - go for it. Want to get a char for lunch? - they're there, all right. Want to try skating a mouse for rainbows? - Why not? Feel like getting your arm wrenched off by the big pull of a salmon? - Yee ha!
    Ummm - that's another myth that doesn't hold true always - that salmon don't come into their own until you move downriver. Not my experience on the Kanektok (and some other places, like Martin Lake, near Cordova). I had excellent silver fishing beginning at the first major turn in the river......a few miles down from Pegati lake. I mean like 4 silvers in 6 casts, stuff like that. And not darkies. They just made it up there and everywhere else. Silvers sometimes hold down low, but some of them go upstream. It depends, on what I don't know. The fish just don't always behave the same all places or all years.

    And that was like August 16, less than a week after they started to show up I was told. So don't pass up any deep holding water either, just because it is upstream. Keep that 8-wt rigged and ready for action.

  12. #12
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tsiutoo View Post
    Just a suggestion for your E.S. Leeches and other wooly bugger-type ties: as a last step, after winding on the palmered hackle, I wind on a piece of Kevlar thread as "ribbing", in a counter-direction that I wound the hackle. Use a bodkin to help pick out any hackle barbs that you inadvertently pin down.

    This small step adds a lot of durability to the fly because the first thing to fail is usually the hackle - it breaks and unwinds. The kevlar is easy to work with, and very tough. Guaranteed to greatly extend the life of the fly.

    Another thought, make egg sucking bunny leeches

    I prefer them personally.


    Below is my all time favorite. An egg sucking "hareball" leech from the good folks at www.alaskaflyfishinggoods.com

    Brad and the guys at this Juneau shop sell the best flies I have ever seen.

    Once at their website, go to "shop", "flies", then "silver salmon flies".

    I would not go fishing anywhere for trophy dollies, rainbows, and especially silvers without a few dozen of these.

    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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