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Thread: Windlass... will it work so I don't have to go to the bow?

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    Default Windlass... will it work so I don't have to go to the bow?

    I am considering putting a windlass on my 2359 trophy (just got it). I know this subject has been posted before, but I want to know how well it would work with my set-up. I would really like it if I could pull the anchor and not have to go to the bow (wouldn't everyone). I was told that I may still have to go up there anyway when/if the anchor rode gets all bunched up in the locker. So if the windlass works well I would get the Lewmar 700 , but if I need to be up there anyway I would look into the Powerwinch.

    http://en.lewmar.com/products/index....=1&page_id=311

    http://www.powerwinch.com/powerwinch...oduct&c=4&p=23
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    Member jeff p's Avatar
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    Default Windlass

    Quote Originally Posted by Emu View Post
    I am considering putting a windlass on my 2359 trophy (just got it). I know this subject has been posted before, but I want to know how well it would work with my set-up. I would really like it if I could pull the anchor and not have to go to the bow (wouldn't everyone). I was told that I may still have to go up there anyway when/if the anchor rode gets all bunched up in the locker. So if the windlass works well I would get the Lewmar 700 , but if I need to be up there anyway I would look into the Powerwinch.

    http://en.lewmar.com/products/index....=1&page_id=311

    http://www.powerwinch.com/powerwinch...oduct&c=4&p=23
    I will offer up my experiance, I actually have installed a lot of the Lewmar product.

    Often it will work trouble free & not need you up there, but in most cases it is benificial if you install foot switches in the bow as well so YOU can operate when on the bow if you need to fix something up there.

    They def make it a lot easier to anchor & are well worth having.

    I would still advise going up to the bow to hook up the saftey cable even when everything works as advertised.

    As a side note you might consider the horizontal Pro Sport model as well, they are a bit easier to install & tend to not slip the rode, especially when mounted higher.

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    Default Going to the bow

    Depending on how much rode you have this may or may not work. My experience has shown that you need a certain amount of free fall so the chain will not bunch up on you. Most windlass manufacturers state this in their instructions. It is sure nice when the task of retreiving the anchor can be handled without leaving the cabin.

    Chuck

  4. #4

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    If the anchor locker sits right beneath that cleat then yes it should work. How well it works depends on how deep it is.

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    Member AkBillyBow's Avatar
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    Default

    I agree with what everyone said so far. They will work without you up front as long as the rode locker is deep enough to allow it to free fall pretty far. Mine works without anyone up front about 1/2 the time. It also depends on how much rode has been let out. If it is up to about 200 feet, it usually works fine. If I have out more than that, it will never free fall properly without my help. I really wish boat builders would realize this and build the lockers deeper instead of wider. It is sure a pleaser when it is nasty out and you don't have to go outside to pull the anchor !!!

    AkBillyBow
    2007 Glacier Bay Cat 2690 Coastal Runner, Twin Honda 150's

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    Member NewMoon's Avatar
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    Default

    We have an earlier version of the Lewmar horizontal-axis windlass, a Horizon 600. It works pretty well for retrieving most of the time, but fairly often needs some help getting the line un-jammed or just laid down well enough in the rode locker. And given our bow pulpit and roller setup, the anchor generally needs some help launching itself on the way down.

    But the real kicker is that if you want to be secure at anchor overnight in some wind, or you want the windlass to last, you need to cleat off the line after you set the anchor, rather than just leave it held by the anti-reverse of the windlass, so you have to go up to the bow anyway.

    Ideally the hole under the windlass is directly above the deepest part of the rode locker, and you have a minimum of 18" (more is better) from the bottom of the hole to the top of the pile of rode. Foot switches at the bow (in addition to those at the helm) are definitely the way to go.
    Richard Cook
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    "Cruising in a Big Way"

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    Member bhollis's Avatar
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    Default

    I've always had to go to the bow on my boat to keep my line from tangling. But I've just invested in some 8-plait line that I'm going to try this year instead of the three-braid I've used in the past. The 8-plait supposedly is far less likely to tangle, and falls into the anchor locker a lot like chain. We'll see.

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    Member kaisersosei's Avatar
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    Default Free Fall

    If you do get the Lewmar, get the free-fall type as it is a lot easier to use especially if you are trying to hold a certain position. The power-down models get old real fast as it takes some time to bring it to the bottom. As far as using it without going up to the bow, I would agree with everyone here with the need to go to the bow in occasion and a foot switch would be great but I have found in my use that a foot switch is not necessary and the actual need to go to the bow is minimal since I found that most of the time I am anchoring up in less than 50 feet of water and in my case, the "hand-free" aspect of the process is about 90-100% in 50 to 100 foot depth and about 50-60% in water over 100 feet. I happen to anchor up in the shallower depth a lot more. Plus, it makes a huge difference whether you are going up there to move the rope-pile or untangle versus pulling the rode in even if you have a capstan windlass. Been there and done that is rain, wind, heavy seas and cold.

    I would personally never get an ocean boat without a power windlass. Also, have a spare buoy kit and fuse in case your windlass goes out. This has not happened to me yet but in case of anything mechanical, it is a matter of when and not if.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by kaisersosei View Post
    If you do get the Lewmar, get the free-fall type as it is a lot easier to use especially if you are trying to hold a certain position. The power-down models get old real fast as it takes some time to bring it to the bottom. As far as using it without going up to the bow, I would agree with everyone here with the need to go to the bow in occasion and a foot switch would be great but I have found in my use that a foot switch is not necessary and the actual need to go to the bow is minimal since I found that most of the time I am anchoring up in less than 50 feet of water and in my case, the "hand-free" aspect of the process is about 90-100% in 50 to 100 foot depth and about 50-60% in water over 100 feet. I happen to anchor up in the shallower depth a lot more. Plus, it makes a huge difference whether you are going up there to move the rope-pile or untangle versus pulling the rode in even if you have a capstan windlass. Been there and done that is rain, wind, heavy seas and cold.

    I would personally never get an ocean boat without a power windlass. Also, have a spare buoy kit and fuse in case your windlass goes out. This has not happened to me yet but in case of anything mechanical, it is a matter of when and not if.
    I'll agree with you the free fall is a real nice feature to have, but like people above have said, most boats don't have a deep enough anchor locker to let the rope untangle itself as it comes out of the hold. It will come up and a knot will form in the windlass and then you have to get out on the bow and attempt to get it out.

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    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Default Research

    I did some research into Windlasses. I am restoring an 86 Sea Ray. Don't forget, most of us in Alaska carry at least 600' of rope (yeah rode). L48: 200' or less.

    I called Lewmar. He had concerns. The representative told me that you have to allow the windlass to "cool" after 15 minutes of use and could not reel in 600' all at once. Cool for about 15 minutes. It would overheat the motor. Let's see you are in heavy seas and you have to allow it to rest..... They also draw an enormous amount of amps and drain your battery quickly if you are not running your engine.

    If your rode locker is anything like mine, it won't store 600' of line anyway (maybe 200' if I am lucky). I have decided not to replace the old windlass I have and spend the 900+ on something else. I have used the boey method for years and has served me well.

    Besides, I have a manual windlass! The Admiral complains once in a while, but I tell her I like the view!

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
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    Too funny Bassking!! Does the Admiral punch you in the neck and make you walk the gangplank or "surrender the bootie" ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by bushboy View Post
    Too funny Bassking!! Does the Admiral punch you in the neck and make you walk the gangplank or "surrender the bootie" ?
    Funny you would ask. The Admiral know how to read a fish finder and she discovered the deepest part of PWS is between Lone and Naked Island at 2400 feet. She tells me one day, my "cement" tennis shoes maybe approperate for that crossing??? Any idea what she is talking about???

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
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    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBassking View Post
    Funny you would ask. The Admiral know how to read a fish finder and she discovered the deepest part of PWS is between Lone and Naked Island at 2400 feet. She tells me one day, my "cement" tennis shoes maybe approperate for that crossing??? Any idea what she is talking about???
    1) you might want to spend the $900 for a new windlass or
    2) you should invest in a HUGE PFD
    or
    3) you might become the newest bait of choice for cod fishing

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    Default Is it really going to take 15 minutes?

    Quote Originally Posted by AKBassking View Post
    I did some research into Windlasses. I am restoring an 86 Sea Ray. Don't forget, most of us in Alaska carry at least 600' of rope (yeah rode). L48: 200' or less.

    I called Lewmar. He had concerns. The representative told me that you have to allow the windlass to "cool" after 15 minutes of use and could not reel in 600' all at once. Cool for about 15 minutes. It would overheat the motor. Let's see you are in heavy seas and you have to allow it to rest..... They also draw an enormous amount of amps and drain your battery quickly if you are not running your engine.

    If your rode locker is anything like mine, it won't store 600' of line anyway (maybe 200' if I am lucky). I have decided not to replace the old windlass I have and spend the 900+ on something else. I have used the boey method for years and has served me well.

    Besides, I have a manual windlass! The Admiral complains once in a while, but I tell her I like the view!
    So they were saying it would take 15 minutes to pull up 600 ft? I don't know about this kind of stuff... does that sound right to you guys?

  15. #15

    Default Rode thickness

    I was interested in getting a windlass until I learned the thickness of the rope itself, chain, and size of the anchor had to be limited. Am I correct in this assumption?

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    Member AkBillyBow's Avatar
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    Emu, he was not saying it takes 15 minutes to pull 600 ft, but it must rest after 15 minutes of straight pulling. Mine is a Lewmar and is rated to pull between 80 and 105 ft / min. So, realistically it would be 5 to 7 minutes to pull almost 600 ft of rode and chain. It depends on the weight of your anchor and the weight of the rode and chain you have out. The more that is out the more "hanging weight" you are pulling to the surface. But no, it does not take 15 minutes to pull 600 feet.

    Myers, to answer your question, yes you need to match the rope diameter and ply as well as the chain size to your windless. If you do not, it will slip and not retrieve. Each windless is marked to what size they use. As for Lewmar, they have a different size for their 700 series and their 1000 series, but I think most brands require similar sizes. It's really not a big deal, just know what you need before you buy it.

    You can find more info at : http://en.lewmar.com/products/index....g=1&page_id=57
    2007 Glacier Bay Cat 2690 Coastal Runner, Twin Honda 150's

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    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Default Locker

    Your anchor locker will also dictate how much line you can put out.

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
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    MMSI# 338131469
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    Default so yours works fine pulling 600 ft?

    Quote Originally Posted by AkBillyBow View Post
    Emu, he was not saying it takes 15 minutes to pull 600 ft, but it must rest after 15 minutes of straight pulling. Mine is a Lewmar and is rated to pull between 80 and 105 ft / min. So, realistically it would be 5 to 7 minutes to pull almost 600 ft of rode and chain. It depends on the weight of your anchor and the weight of the rode and chain you have out. The more that is out the more "hanging weight" you are pulling to the surface. But no, it does not take 15 minutes to pull 600 feet.

    Myers, to answer your question, yes you need to match the rope diameter and ply as well as the chain size to your windless. If you do not, it will slip and not retrieve. Each windless is marked to what size they use. As for Lewmar, they have a different size for their 700 series and their 1000 series, but I think most brands require similar sizes. It's really not a big deal, just know what you need before you buy it.

    You can find more info at : http://en.lewmar.com/products/index....g=1&page_id=57
    So when you end up pulling 600 ft with your Lewmar it does it just fine? Which one do you have? I'm on the fence for getting the Lewmar 700 Pro and would be VERY dissapointed after spending a little over 1,000 bucks if it had to "cool" in the middle of pulling up 600 ft.

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    Default It currently has 600 ft of rode

    Quote Originally Posted by AKBassking View Post
    Your anchor locker will also dictate how much line you can put out.
    I currently have 600 ft of rode in my locker right now, but as you can see by the picture that I posted that it's all stacked up to the top of the locker. So I'm sure if I have all 600 ft out that I will need to go up there and move it around so it doesn't stack up. So I liked the idea of having a remote switch up at the bow to control it if needed.

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    Member AkBillyBow's Avatar
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    Emu, If I am correct mine is the Lewmar 700 Pro. I am sure it is a 700 model, just not 100% sure which one. Mine came on the boat from the factory.

    I have never had a problem with it, but only have one season on it. It never had a problem pulling, and never overheated or needed to cool down. But, if I were buying one like you are, I would buy from the 1000 series. The only reason I say this is the diameter of the rope that they require. When I shopped around for the rode in Anchorage, everyone was surprised that I was going to put the smaller diameter rope ( 1/2 ") on a 26 foot boat. They all suggested 5/8 " to use on boats over 20 foot with our high current waters in Alaska.

    The 700 series will only work with 1/2" while their 1000 series works with 9/16 or 5/8 in rope. So, I was a bit nervous using only 1/2" rope, but had no choice since my boat came with the 700 series windless. I looked at West Marine and the difference between the two was only like $100.

    So, my opinion is buy the 1000 series (get it with the free fall option for sure ) so you can use the heavier sized rope. If nothing else, just for piece of mind.

    Hope this helps,

    AkBillyBow
    2007 Glacier Bay Cat 2690 Coastal Runner, Twin Honda 150's

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