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Thread: broadhead flight

  1. #1
    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
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    Default broadhead flight

    Ive had this question up on archery talk and it seems you get such varied responses that I dont know what to do. Here is my question then I will explain my set up. I never can seem to get my broadheads to fly consistantly, not with eachother and not with field tips. When I shoot them the seem to kick off my bow and fish tail through the air. then hit on all different places of the target. Ive read alittle about broadhead tuning and that in theory you can get almost any head to hit with your fieldtips if your bow is properly tuned. Ive also read that this is a myth created by a broadhead company to sell their product. Does anyone have a real answer or solution to my problem. Its not that Im necessarily missing the target although I have at 40 but I would like to beable to group in a 6in plate at 40yards with my broadheads. I shoot a 07 bowtech alliegance 70lb 30in draw with a scott saber tooth release 29in redhead carbon max 400's with 100gr redhead blackouts and 2in blazers ripcord drop away. I have also tried it with 125gr thunderheads and 4in vanes same problem.

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    Default hmmmm

    do your field points have flight problems too?

    Without seeing what's going on, I'd say you either have a contact problem or your setup isn't quite right. Meaning your rest isn't sitting quite where it should be, or your nock point is wrong, or your tiller is out of whack or your cams are doing something wonky.

    Yes, it is possible to have field points and broadheads fly to the same point of impact. However it's not that big of deal in my opinion. I look at this the same way I look at switching reloading components in my rifles. IF you change something, expect things to change.

    As long as I'm getting good straight arrow flight and good groups I don't care if the field points and broadheads hit at the same point. The way I see it, that's why we have adjustable sights.

    just my 2 cents

  3. #3
    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
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    Default

    No my field points fly excellent. So to check contact issues would I use lipstick on my vanes?

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Default

    This is what I have to do with my BH. I put them on with each blade aligned with a vane. I shot. If it's off or flying funny I rotate the nock on vane. I shot again. What this is doing is getting the spine right. Also I sometimes rotate the BH to each BH. If I can not get that arrow to fly correct I will swap out BH and try it again. If that fails I trash the arrow. It takes me to so a dozen about 2 hours to get everything the way I like it. If I don't hit the X the arrow isn't perfect.

    Not if the arrow if flying good but low, hight, left or right I adjust my sight to that.
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    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
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    Default

    THanks ak gray that makes sense to me. It seems like i always have one arrow with a broadhead that flys perfect. I have no problem adjusting my sights for broad heads Id rather they hit close to my field tips for small game while hunting. I will have to try this. any other suggestions would be helpful
    Hunter

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    Default Your Problems

    Yoda,
    Use spray foot power to check contact issues. It works well, and no danger of getting athlete's foot on hands/fingers.

    Then, follow Alaska Gray's instructions below.

    You do want to make sure all of your BH's fly right. I also don't think it makes too much of a difference, if there is a difference between fields points and BH. Since I am anal, I will chase that down, until both land in the same place.

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    Default

    how crazy do you want to get?? WARNING LONG POST AHEAD

    Broadhead tuning is pretty involved. Most of it involves not just tuning the bow, but tuning the arrows to the bow.

    I've been competing and hunting with a bow for several years and I can group any just about any broadhead with my field tips out to 60 yards.

    This is my method for tuning: Warning, it gets involved...First things first, make sure you're anchoring the same, and holding your bow hand, shoulder grip everything must be the same way exactly the same every time you shoot. Otherwise you'll just end up pulling your hair out. Small things like different pressure on the bow hand will alter your impact greatly.

    1. Make sure the arrow selected is properly spined with the proper tip. Generally 100gr to 125 gr will work just fine. I prefer 125 because it gives a better Front of Center percentage. This is important for broadhead steering. Cut the arrow to length where it will spine correctly for your draw weight and poundage. you can find this using an arrow program like Archers advantage or ontarget2. both are very good, ontarget is cheaper.

    also squaring the ends of your arrows and inserts is important. If you spin your broadheads on a table it should not wobble. if it does you need to either square the ends of the shaft or try a different broadhead.

    2. MAke sure you're not getting any fletch contact when your shooting. Shoot into a bale 5 yards away, spray yoru fletching with foot powder and see if you're getting any contact anywhere.

    3. Find your dynamic centershot: the best way to do this is called walkback tuning. (Get all your pins lined up in a straight line on your sight and make all your adjustments moving the whole cage) start at 10yards and get your zero dead on. move back to 20 shoot another group. walk back to 30, 40, 60..as far as you can shoot accurately. DO NOT MAKE ANY ADJUSTMENTS TO YOUR SIght AS YOU WALK BACK. If your shots are drifting to the right as you get further from your target move your rest to the left 1/32". Go back to 10 yards rezero your entire sight and repeat the process. If they drift to the left with distance move your rest to the right. ALWAYS MOVE IN SMALL INCREMENTS. 1/32" MAY NOT SEEM LIKE A LOT BUT IT CAN MAKE BIG IMPACT CHANGES. once you have all your shots dead on out to as far as you can shoot your centershot is set. Don't move it.

    4. If you're shooting a two cam bow you can creep tune. You can do it with binaries but I'm not as experienced with binaries. One cam bows you can't really creep tune. If you're interested in the procedure send me a pm. The long and short of it is basically to make sure your cams are in time.

    5. Now you can start shooting your broadheads: Before you start number each arrow on the fletching. start at 20 yards.



    Take arrow number one fire with field tip. note the impact. Walk down retrieve arrow number one and put the broadhead on. Fire with broadhead. note the impact, retreive arrow and repeat 3 times. (If it impacts in different places then you most likely have a form issue, something is not being repeated the same way. probably in the bow hand where your hand contacts the bow. Broadheads amplify form irregularities) If it impacts in the same place, that is good. take the the arrow with the broadhead and turn the nock to a different cock vane. Fire again. note the impact. Keep rotating cock vane until your poi with broadhead is the same as your field tip at 20 yards. for an arrow with 3 vanes you have a total of 6 nock positions. Don't forget to flip it 180 degrees and use those rotations as well. One of these position should get you close if not dead on left/right with your field tips. If the best you can get is dead center but just high or just low this is ok as well, we'll get to that later.

    repeat this with all your arrows until they all or most impact to the same as field tips or just high or just low. (side note once you find an arrow broadhead combo, number the arrow and broadhead and use them together. IF you can't get a broadhead to group with the rest, try switching broadheads...I haven't found that this really works too often but it can)

    If you find that when Shoot all your arrows with broadheads and If they consitently impact in the same place. That is good. If they're all low, then raise your rest up 1/32" at a time until they impact to the same place your field tips do.. you will have to rezero your field tips each time you move your rest. If they're impacting high lower your rest 1/32" at a time.

    If they're just off to the left or right you can move your rest in the direction you want your broadheads to go again in 1/32" till they impact with your field tips, however if you do that check your walk back tuning again with field tips. If it threw it off put the centershot back to where it was. You might have to just discard that arrrow or try a different combo head/nock.

    once your good at 20 yards. Repeat your groups at 40 yards and beyond if you can.


    This is just the method I use and it is involved and time consuming but I know that once completed my bow and arrow tune is as best it can be.

    You can accomplish most of the above by bareshaft tuning as well. Be forewarned Bareshaft tuning is not easy and your form must be rock solid.

    Hope that helps.

  8. #8
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Easton

    Easton has a bowtuning guide on their web page that may help you too. It includes a chart for you to look at ( nock high, nock low left,....) it takes a bit to download but its worth it.

    Another good book is: Tuning Your Compound Bow. An for some reason it is not in on the bookshelf.

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    Default paper tuning

    I dont know if you have tried this yet but you might wanna try paper tuning to. it took me a while to paper tune my bow to my standards but after doing so i was able to Robbin hood 3 of my arrows. This pic is of the first one i did which was pretty much straight down the middle. and this link should cover just about everything. hope it works.
    http://www.strictlybowhunting.com/An..._tuning_TB.htm

  10. #10

    Default

    I am not familar with that arrow but you said 400 If they name them by deflextion your under spind.

    A ICS 340 or stiffer will be required and if you use a 100-130gr broad head to keep enough weight forward. In the interest of speed most cut down on broadhead weight and get an arrow with to little weight bias in the front. A quick cheeper thing to try is an XX75 2216 or stiffer arrow.

    As for bow tuning thats up to you.

  11. #11
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    Default Check Spine of arrow

    From the post below, I agree, check the spine of your arrow. Your arrow should have a spine of about 0.340, if you are shooting carbon arrows. Check manufacturers spec, for your arrow.

    IF your spine is too big, you can partially off-set by using 100 grain tips rather that 125.

    Another thing you can do is lower your draw weight. At 70 lbs, with your 30" draw, you will have a hard time getting an arrow that is properly spined.

    I have my bow dialed down to 58 pounds for practice, and it may eliminate your problem, if you arrow is too weak.

    Anyway. have fun with it.

  12. #12
    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
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    Default think i found it

    I was sure the spine was right for my set up. However after reading the last few posts I decided to look up the arrow chart online. It seems i'm overspined for my setup. I would have to be shooting like a 32 or 33inch arrow to shoot the 4000's. I think I should be shooting the 3000's but Ill have to wait to get some money before I switch.

  13. #13
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Talking My OBVIOUS solution:

    FOB 'em!!!!!

    But seriously, spine was my first concern as well, not having checked your factory spec's. Very happy that you may have it worked out. Keep us posted.

    Taylor

    -[]------->
    Last edited by Marc Taylor; 03-26-2009 at 13:23. Reason: incomplete

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fishingyoda View Post
    Ive had this question up on archery talk and it seems you get such varied responses that I dont know what to do. Here is my question then I will explain my set up. I never can seem to get my broadheads to fly consistantly, not with eachother and not with field tips. When I shoot them the seem to kick off my bow and fish tail through the air. then hit on all different places of the target. Ive read alittle about broadhead tuning and that in theory you can get almost any head to hit with your fieldtips if your bow is properly tuned. Ive also read that this is a myth created by a broadhead company to sell their product. Does anyone have a real answer or solution to my problem. Its not that Im necessarily missing the target although I have at 40 but I would like to beable to group in a 6in plate at 40yards with my broadheads. I shoot a 07 bowtech alliegance 70lb 30in draw with a scott saber tooth release 29in redhead carbon max 400's with 100gr redhead blackouts and 2in blazers ripcord drop away. I have also tried it with 125gr thunderheads and 4in vanes same problem.
    I sent you a PM.

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