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Thread: Iam just wondering

  1. #1

    Default Iam just wondering

    Here is what I wonder. With all of the questions here. I wonder how the old timers ever lived to tell their stories. What ever happend to going and finding out for yourself? This is just a question not a statement. Who ran the river before them??

  2. #2

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    Yes, Everyone worships "Dick Proenneke" of "One Mans Wilderness", and yet He lived in someone Else's cabin just down the lake, while he built his cabin. Why don't people worship the guy who built the cabin Dick lived in for two summers. And before the ankle'biters on this forum attack me for questioning their idol, I at least knew Dick, and he was a good, and interesting man.

    Charles Sheldon, "The Wilderness of Denali" spent two years living in a wall tent one hundred years before the Candle Kid dies squatting in a hardshell bus, in roughly the same area.

    Sadly Thoreau got it correct, most men live a life "of quiet desperation", they get a semi-euphoric arousal from talking about it, while knowing they will never do it. (Yes, ankle'biter.....I built a cabin on Lake Ckark, yes by hand)

    There are many good books written by men who where exploring Alaska in the late 1800's, While they are not nail biters, but they are very educational.

    I wonder if mosquito repellent works on "forum ankle'biters".........

  3. #3
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I wonder how the old timers ever lived to tell their stories.
    A whole bunch didn't.
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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    A whole bunch didn't.
    Actually, they all died...eventually.

    I had a job when I was going to UAF in the early 80s microfilming old books and documents. One was a tiny journal written by an oldtimer with an indelible pencil. Of course, I had to read every page before I took the picture. It told of his life alone and him complaining about his "bum" leg. He got weaker and weaker made a last entry that basically was a last will and testament. Only his journal survived.

    Lots of people did a lot more than Dick P. I met him back in 1970 when he showed his film to our high school. I thought it was cool than and still do. There are a lot more old timers who accomplished a lot more than he but didn't document their feats.
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    Default Learn from others is easier

    I've done a few things without the benefit of the wisdom of those who had done it before. I survived, but it sure is easier when you know what not to do before hand. That said, I'll still occasionally do stuff to "find out" just for the fun of it. I just don't do that quite so often any more though!

  6. #6

    Default Old timers

    It's like the wildebeest crossing the crock infested river, i was fortunate to be at the rear of the heard.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hotcity2 View Post
    With all of the questions here. I wonder how the old timers ever lived to tell their stories. What ever happened to going and finding out for yourself?
    This is actually pretty easy to answer. The answer is that the "old timers" did this stuff for a living.

    You would no more ask one of these "old timers" how to send a text message on a cell phone than you would ask one of today's young "whippersnappers" how to tan a fox hide.

    The "old timers" who lived off the land did so all their lives. They learned to do it from their fathers and grandfathers. It is all they knew. Today, we have lost most of that wisdom. It was no longer needed in our society and the kids stopped listening to dad's lessons on surviving off the land in favor of the the easy road that mechanization was lying before us. Eventually, we had no need for the woodsman's skills and they mostly disappeared.

    I'd bet that you could take a group of kids out of any big city in America, take them into the forest, hand them a book of matches, and ask them to build and fire and no one would be able to do it. A hundred years ago that was a basic skill of daily survival.
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  8. #8
    Member Michael's Avatar
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    Several years ago my wife and I did Senior foster care. One of the gentlemen that lived with us was from Hope.

    While reading the Suday paper I came across an indepth interview and article about a fellow that had taken 2 weeks to travel the Ressurection trail from Hope to Seward. He did some trail mainteneance along the way and generally had a good time. I saved the article for our friend. He read it and kind of shrugged his shoulders. I didn't get it, I thought it was pretty impressive. In discussing it he said that they routinely made that trip 2 or 3 times a winter just to go to town, not counting supply trips.

    I guess it's all in your time and perspective.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hopeak View Post
    Yes, Everyone worships "Dick Proenneke" of "One Mans Wilderness", and yet He lived in someone Else's cabin just down the lake, while he built his cabin. Why don't people worship the guy who built the cabin Dick lived in for two summers. And before the ankle'biters on this forum attack me for questioning their idol, I at least knew Dick, and he was a good, and interesting man.

    Charles Sheldon, "The Wilderness of Denali" spent two years living in a wall tent one hundred years before the Candle Kid dies squatting in a hardshell bus, in roughly the same area.

    Sadly Thoreau got it correct, most men live a life "of quiet desperation", they get a semi-euphoric arousal from talking about it, while knowing they will never do it. (Yes, ankle'biter.....I built a cabin on Lake Ckark, yes by hand)

    There are many good books written by men who where exploring Alaska in the late 1800's, While they are not nail biters, but they are very educational.

    I wonder if mosquito repellent works on "forum ankle'biters".........
    I for one have no worship of him, I saw the movie and was not impressed in the least, it was so-so and and a lot of B/S I thought.

  10. #10
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    Read his book before seeing the film/s. Very easy to see the difference between his footage and agmented film. Book is awesome, video put visual to some of the things he detailed in the book.

    I live the summers on an island and far from making it in the wild I keep a cold camp when guests are not there. It was a fixer-upper and the first summer we spent working the place was without power (gen set). Many things we take for comfort on a short trip not possible for the summer like ice become worth almost gold. Not as romantic as a 3 week trip into Alaska's back country for fun. These old timers did what they did to survive not fun. Imagine how much wood you would need to make it all winter and collect it without gas power! Now you have to harvest enough protein to live... These guys didn't have veggies all winter, think about that?

    I would change what I did but romantic it was not.

    George

  11. #11
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    Dick Proenneke's book and later DVD's are just a small part now "Alasken History", just like the tens of thousands of men and women who came before him to live in Alaska. He made the choice of living in the bush for himself, those who came long before him did so in alot of cases out of necessity because there was no Infrastructure or road systems. I would hope that more about our Alasken past is put to print or videoed so we don't lose it, There are less and less "Old Timer's" and when there gone if their stories are not documented they may be lost.

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