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Thread: Bear charge video

  1. #1
    Member moose-head's Avatar
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    Default Bear charge video

    Prett cool bear charge video I found on you tube it is from a Cabela's video. It is sad that the sow was shot, but they were in a pretty intense situation. The bear may have stopped before the shot, but I can't fault their decision. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZnsL7-UdGc
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    Great clip. Down under related video is one called "Bear Attack Easton Bowhunting TV" that's also intense. Shows how fast things can go from great to s*&# in a hurry.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Righteous DLP kill. Nothing else you can do when a bear charges in from a hundred yards out and you've done all the right stuff as far as identifying yourself as a human, making noise, etc. That bear didn't stop and was taken at about 8 yards.

    What is really sad about the whole thing is the pure, venomous hate in the comments posted for this video. It is one thing to disagree with a person's lifestyle, but to publicly wish them a violent death is simply disgusting. Don't let your kids read the krap posted on the linked video page!
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    I don't look forward to that situation personally as I doubt my diapers could handle the outcome.
    Alaska Outdoors Television ~ Outdoor Channel

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    I'm sure they did not want to shoot that bear with a cub and they waited until the last possible second to shot. Too Bad, but you have to protect yourself.

  6. #6
    Member H_I_L_L_B_I_L_L_Y's Avatar
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    Default Good video

    I saw this about a year ago and thought they did the only thing they could do. I tell you what the guy behind the camera is braver than me. great fotage of 100% justified DLP. That bear was not stopping! Hillbilly

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    The main guy is Charles Allen. I actually gave him some instrument flying lessons back around 1990. He came to Alaska to fly fish off the beach in a C-206. He later got a guide license.

    He opened a lodge named Driftwood lodge and started the Knives of Alaska company, quite an entrepreneur.

    He's a nice guy, his lodge is for sale on remote Alaska properties and his knife company seems to be doing well. He currently lives in Texas.

    http://www.alaskaexpedition.com/host.htm

    http://www.knivesofalaska.com/

    http://www.remoteproperties.com/lodge/tsiuriver.html

  8. #8

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    The video is a "classic" from the stand point of showing what not to do (at least in part) when taking a bear.
    1.) instead of taking the bear midway across the opening they waited until the bear was on the extreme left side of the field of fire, greatly reducing the ability to take a second shot; (the animal they intended to harvest)
    2.) on at least two occasions, one individual, I believe the guide, placed himself between and individual(s) with a loaded weapon and the charging bear;
    3.) no attempt was made to shoot in front the charging animal. Often, though certainly not always, shooting in front of the animal and "spraying" it with sand or gravel will make it turn.

    Nothing in this post is intended to suggest the incident was not a legitimate DLP.
    Joe (Ak)

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    The video is a "classic" from the stand point of showing what not to do (at least in part) when taking a bear.
    1.) instead of taking the bear midway across the opening they waited until the bear was on the extreme left side of the field of fire, greatly reducing the ability to take a second shot; (the animal they intended to harvest)
    2.) on at least two occasions, one individual, I believe the guide, placed himself between and individual(s) with a loaded weapon and the charging bear;
    3.) no attempt was made to shoot in front the charging animal. Often, though certainly not always, shooting in front of the animal and "spraying" it with sand or gravel will make it turn.

    Nothing in this post is intended to suggest the incident was not a legitimate DLP.
    Joe (Ak)
    (Note:The video also shows another bear right about where he takes his second shot - a sow and cub just after are visible on the bank just above where his bear should have been. Unless it wasn't audible, did not sound as if the guide cautioned the hunter about other bear in the immediate area where he took his second shot. Not good.)
    Joe (Ak)

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    2.) on at least two occasions, one individual, I believe the guide, placed himself between and individual(s) with a loaded weapon and the charging bear;
    I've never shot a bear or experienced a charging animal or the adrenaline that would drive that type of response. I did notice the above statement when I first watched the video. I too was concerned that the shot came from behind Charles which could have gone real bad in a hurry.

    Regardless of the current outcome, it could have been worse and it's always easier to stand back and say what could have been done. Perhaps we can learn from this and improve our skills.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    (Note:The video also shows another bear right about where he takes his second shot - a sow and cub just after are visible on the bank just above where his bear should have been. Unless it wasn't audible, did not sound as if the guide cautioned the hunter about other bear in the immediate area where he took his second shot. Not good.)
    Joe (Ak)
    I had to watch the video again to see what you're referring to. the first shot was taken at 1:36 into the video. I did not see any other bear for about 20 seconds.

    I'm pretty sure they where focused on the wounded bear. Hard to say for sure but there may have been a speck in the area that the sow came from prior to the second shot.

  12. #12
    Member fishin_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    The video is a "classic" from the stand point of showing what not to do (at least in part) when taking a bear.
    1.) instead of taking the bear midway across the opening they waited until the bear was on the extreme left side of the field of fire, greatly reducing the ability to take a second shot; (the animal they intended to harvest)
    2.) on at least two occasions, one individual, I believe the guide, placed himself between and individual(s) with a loaded weapon and the charging bear;
    3.) no attempt was made to shoot in front the charging animal. Often, though certainly not always, shooting in front of the animal and "spraying" it with sand or gravel will make it turn.

    Nothing in this post is intended to suggest the incident was not a legitimate DLP.
    Joe (Ak)
    I'm not so sure I'd say this exemplifies "what not to do." I agree that the original shot on the animal they intended to harvest could have been taken a little sooner. If the "client" had not been so worried about the video production, perhaps that would have happened. Doubtful the extra twenty yards the bear walked before he fired the first shot would have given him any better chance at a second shot since the bear was standing still and his second shot seemed to miss completely anyway. As for the guide stepping in front of a loaded weapon, maybe if the "client" hadn't been backpedaling, he wouldn't have had to step in front of him to save his own ass. If you want to use your first shot in attempt to spray gravel in the face of a bear that's hell bent on putting you on the ground, let me know how that works out for you. I think Charles is one cool customer to have waitied as long as he did to take his shot. It's easy to armchair QB something like this. Having been false charged to within about 10 yards a few years ago on the Russian river and hearing all the "what I would have dones" although you might think you know how you'll react, it's a whole different ball game when it's for real.
    " There's a fine line between fishing and standing on the shore like an idiot" - Steven Wright

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by fishin_ak View Post
    "...what I would have dones" although you might think you know how you'll react, it's a whole different ball game when it's for real.
    By now think I "know' how I would react, but, then you might be right.
    Joe (Ak)

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    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    By now think I "know' how I would react, but, then you might be right.
    Joe (Ak)

    I agree with FishinAK. Theres absolutely no way you can know for certain how you would react in that situation. Unless you've been charged by a bear and had to react I think its impossible to know for sure. When the **** hits the fan all you can do is hope that you are able to preform the things you mentally prepared youself to do in a given situation. Joe, I think its excellent that you've already given quite a bit of thought as to how you would react.

    When I watched this video a year or so ago I realized that after the charging sow was shot the guide is audibly upset that they had to harvest the sow. Personally I think this represents exactly what you ought TO DO.

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Some good points made here. Until you are in the situation for yourself, your opinion does not really matter that much. Hindsight is always 20/20.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Member slimm's Avatar
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    Default Text Comments (20,205)

    WOW!!! That is pretty intense,, that fella's got a brass monkey..
    i read through about 10/12 pages of the 20,205 comments,, It's Scarey the amount of people referred to the bears as a family..

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    Some good points made here. Until you are in the situation for yourself, your opinion does not really matter that much. Hindsight is always 20/20.
    Yup.... but I will add... aint no reason the shooter/client turned around to make sure the camera was rolling while he missed his best shot on the bear. You can see where his mind was at. Don't want that guy in my camp.

    As for the guide, not much to critique IMO. He did as best as could be expected in the situation. As for 20/20 lessons learned... a shot in front of the charging bear earlier might have prevented the DLP. But that is 20/20 hind sight.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
    Yup.... but I will add... aint no reason the shooter/client turned around to make sure the camera was rolling while he missed his best shot on the bear. You can see where his mind was at. Don't want that guy in my camp.

    As for the guide, not much to critique IMO. He did as best as could be expected in the situation. As for 20/20 lessons learned... a shot in front of the charging bear earlier might have prevented the DLP. But that is 20/20 hind sight.
    There is no "hind sight" to it. Certainly if the video was of a group of inexperienced people on a bear hunt the events could (and should) be viewed from a different prospective. However, that was not the situation. At least one of the individuals was a registered big game guide. As a registered professional he is and should be held to a higher standard.
    As I indicated in my original I don't question whether killing of the bear was a legitimate DLP. However, it is a common practice to shoot in front of the animal in an attempt to turn it. With some types of ground cover it may not be practical though the ground cover appears to be sandy in the video.
    The guide moved out in front of the client(s) when the bear started running towards them, this created at least two concerns, first being the safety issue by placing himself between the charging bear and loaded rifles and second by moving in front of the other people lost the ability to monitor both the charging bear and client(s). Both of which are important for the wellbeing of all concerned.
    Why the bear was allowed to so far across the field of fire before the shooting was started I don't know, however, as the potential "field of fire" decreased the chances of the bear getting away wounded increased with every step.
    Right - wrong not the issue. However, there are some procedures that had they been followed would have reduced the probability of the targeted animal being wounded and not secured; possibly avoided the killing of the sow and provided a safer environment for those participating in the hunt.
    Hopefully these would be objectives shared by all hunters.
    Has nothing to do with "blame", but does have to do with viewing a particular set of circumstances and hopefully learning how to increase the chances of a more favorable outcome.
    Joe (Ak)

  19. #19
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Interesting take on things, but we all had the luxury of watching the situation unfold on a video. The folks there had to react WHILE it was happening, not afterwards. Hindsight is 20/20 and the world is full of Monday morning quarterbacks. I say give them some slack and just be glad nobody was injured.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by MBURNS2244 View Post
    I agree with FishinAK. Theres absolutely no way you can know for certain how you would react in that situation. Unless you've been charged by a bear and had to react I think its impossible to know for sure. When the **** hits the fan all you can do is hope that you are able to preform the things you mentally prepared youself to do in a given situation. Joe, I think its excellent that you've already given quite a bit of thought as to how you would react.

    When I watched this video a year or so ago I realized that after the charging sow was shot the guide is audibly upset that they had to harvest the sow. Personally I think this represents exactly what you ought TO DO.
    It is not only a matter of just having "...given quite a bit of thought as to how you (I) would react..", but a matter of having to practice it over the past fifty plus years.
    I don't "fault" anyone for having shot the sow, however, if the time indicated by the video is correct, there was over thirty seconds from the time the sow was sighted until she was shot. Certainly more than enough time to have shot in front of her, she was in sight for the full time; or, to have "dropped" either coats or packs and moved back. If the bear passes the dropped item there's really no choice but to shoot.
    If "...exactly what you ought TO DO." Refers to remorse over having to shot the sow, I certainly agree; if it refers how the guide handled the situation from the time the client was in position to shot until the sow was killed, I could not disagree more.
    For individuals hunting bears that have either little or not experience the events are certainly understandable, for a licensed professional they are inexcusable.
    Fortunately no one was injured, sadly a sow was killed.
    Joe (Ak)

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