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Thread: What's it Worth....

  1. #1
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    Default What's it Worth....

    I found this rifle this morning...seems cheap, what do you think it's worth and what do you think of it as far as bolt rifles go?

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=124209565

    A 1966 FN Browning bolt action 30-06. Pretty much Mauser with a couple of improvements. How do you like it?
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  2. #2

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    Murph,

    Since you snatched it up I'd guess you already know what it is worth. My old rule of thumb is if you want it buy it; and if you don't want it it does not really matter how cheap it is.

    All kidding aside, it looks like a good find.

  3. #3
    Member Eastwoods's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Saw a similar one one G&A for, I think, $1600, so I say you did real good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    I found this rifle this morning...seems cheap, what do you think it's worth and what do you think of it as far as bolt rifles go?

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=124209565

    A 1966 FN Browning bolt action 30-06. Pretty much Mauser with a couple of improvements. How do you like it?
    Hmm, it's probably got one to those Salt-Cured stocks.

    If you wanna recoup, SOME of your money, give me a holler.

    Smitty of the North
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  5. #5
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    I have no idea what its worth. But the price does seem cheap with the fancy stock and engraving that it has.

    I like it. It looks like a Classic workhorse rifle, with a nice flair to it to show off.

    Good find

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    It's on its way. I'll rip it out of the stock and take some pictures and see if I got a bargain. I have always liked these rifles. They are very well made a finished and a dressed up version of the Mauser 98. The trigger is much improved over the Mauser and the bolt release has a classy look. It has a three position tang slider safety that isn't my favorite but is a good and functional safety. We'll see if it was worth the price in about a week.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  7. #7
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    I love Mausers. It's too bad left-handed versions are so rare.
    Now what ?

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    I have this one in hand now. It is not a salt wood gun, it is all original, correct parts with numbers, etc except for a cleverly engraved rams head in the bolt knob. Rather interesting engraving.

    The gun shows some honest wear but it was immaculately clean, even inside the bolt body. That is unusual for an internet gun. It is a 1966 model of a very well made Mauser. These guns were true Mauser 98's with the minor exception of the receiver collar being cut through in the left raceway, but I've found most don't know what that is and don't care about it. The trigger is one of the best ever, rivaling the model 70 for design and function. I adjusted it to a very crisp three pounds.

    The safety is three position though most think it was only two. It is of the sliding tang type type place along side the rear receiver tang. It's a very good safety in function, locking both the trigger and sear positively in position two and the bolt, in addition, in postion three. It's failing if it has one would be that it doesn't act directly on the striker as do the Mauser and Winchester safeties. I took it out of the stock and disassembled the whole rifle last night. I cleaned and lubed contact parts of the safety and cocking cam of the bolt with my secret super lube grease, Brownells action lube.

    I adjusted the trigger by filing down the trigger stop screw (overtravel) down .010" and stoning it flat then reassembled and set the over travel stop. By shortening the screw it allows the overtravel screw lock nut to ride higher on the screw. This gives more room for the triggger spring, thus less compression and lowers the weight of pull about 1# per .010" of adjustment. I only do this on my own guns and I suppose I'm the only one who has ever done this but after owning about 80 of these rifles I have them figured out pretty well. I also stone the trigger seat that sets on the sear notch to smooth it up and this gives an excellent trigger break.

    These Browning bolt rifles are among the very best of their era. Every bit the rifle the model 70 Winchester is with some points of improvement. A very effective meld of old world M98 and modern craftsmanship. We could argue over the trigger/safety configuration compared to the model 98 or model 70 but it has a classy look few would complain about. Another point that differs from the M98 is the classy bolt release, a Browning trademark for bolt guns and the nicest looking release for any Mauser. They come drilled and tapped 6x48, and accept standard M98 mounts available form all makers. The rear sight was also another Browning exclusive with a fold down rear fully adjustable for windage and elevation. The front is a bead on a ramp that is silver soldered to the barrel, complete with factory sight hood.

    The rifle weighs in at 7 pounds 2 ounces without scope or mounts and sports a very useful original set of sights mounted on its true sporter weight 22" barrel. The barrel has the typical FN stepped down look that I find asthetically pleasing.

    The stock is of french walnut with a high gloss glassy finish that has aged and shows slight cracking of finish as is typical of stock of forty to fifty years ago. It shows little wear on the original hard rubber (not plastic) butt plate with Browning embossed on it. This rifle stock is one of the best designs for handling recoil. Though it isn't an issue in a 7 pound 30-06 it can be with the 458 Win mag the largest caliber these rifles were made in. I have a 1964 model in the 458 WM and with its factory installed recoil pad it is a mild mannered thumper. This older magnum model still has the claw extractor discontinued in 1966 on magnum models of this rifle. All standard calibers carried the Mauser claw extractor throughout the 16 years these rifles were made. (1959 to 1974)

    This is a very nice rifle, hopefully it will shoot as well as others I've owned, they have very good barrels. I have a few rounds of ammo left over from the Garand testing done recently and some 180 grain hunting loads made for another fellow who failed to claim them. With this warmer weather of spring upon us I can test this one out this week end. I think I can find a 1.75-6 Leupold laying around even if I have to take it from another rifle. I have a set of Warne bases for this action so I should be good to go for a week end project.

    The total cost of this rifle including shipping, handling, dealer prep and undercoating.......$715. Not bad, not bad at all.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  9. #9

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    You did alright and especially if it shoots good.
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