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Thread: Marine head storage tank placement

  1. #1
    Member Maast's Avatar
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    Default Marine head storage tank placement

    I've come across a Type III MSD holding tank system the author calls "KISS (keep it simple system) that I'd like to get your opinions on, it seems the best thought-out head and storage tank layout I've come across.

    From the web site:

    http://www.sailcopress.com/editorial%20MSD.htm

    The concept

    The concept is simplicity itself. The tank, installed above the waterline, is emptied overboard by gravity. All waste goes through the tank. The toilet pumps directly to the top of the tank.
    (MSD) there is no "Y" valve or any other extra leak-prone joint in the system. The toilet itself can be either manual or electric, it makes no difference.

    The outlet at the bottom of the tank leads to a "Tee." One of the fittings goes to the seacock, the other to the deck pump-out fitting. To use the tank, you close the seacock. To flush straight through, you open the seacock.

    No Complicated pumps or valves, no smelly leaky vented loops, yards less of piping, dozens less hose clamps and no electrical connections necessary.

    The K.I.S.S. system is elementary. The toilet pumps the waste up above the waterline into the holding tank. Gravity pulls it out. Simply by closing the outlet seacock, the holding tank is in use.

    If your are emptying it offshore, you just open the seacock and it drains out by itself. To rinse, just pump the head.

    Another important aspect to this system is that the tank is higher than most, especially those way down in the bilge, thus reducing the amount of "head" (suction) needed to pump the tank from dockside pump-out facilities. By reducing the vacuum, the tank and hoses will last considerably longer and be less prone to operational failure.
    Last edited by Maast; 02-26-2010 at 09:03.

  2. #2

    Default

    The idea of having everything above the water line sounds great. They do not say anything about treatment until you read deeper into the information. Appears treatment is based on composting which takes time (more than the 2-3 day excursions most folks take on a weekend) for breakdown/treatment. Without breaking the waste up to shorten treatment and if there isn't adequate treatment time, the drain will plug up. I think it is a great idea for those that have boats with adequate room to put a properly sized waste treatment tank. This is similar to septic tank treatment without any baffels in the tank.

  3. #3

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    The idea of having everything above the water line sounds great. They do not say anything about treatment until you read deeper into the information. Appears treatment is based on composting which takes time (more than the 2-3 day excursions most folks take on a weekend) for breakdown/treatment. Without breaking the waste up to shorten treatment and if there isn't adequate treatment time, the drain will plug up. I think it is a great idea for those that have boats with adequate room to put a properly sized waste treatment tank. This is similar to septic tank treatment without any baffels in the tank. Stick with the porta potty or macerator/holding tank.

  4. #4
    Member Maast's Avatar
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    Default

    Actually, the bottom third of that page is referring to a completely seperate item; a composting toilet for boats, and changing over to one.

    The idea is to have the holding tank above the waterline and let it flow out with gravity (out beyond the 3 mile limit of course ) while still allowing for a pumpout, a lot less plumbing and no diaphram pumps or Y-valves to break or leak (common) which is a Huge and exceedingly nasty pain in the ***** to fix.

    My only real concern was the ability of the toilets pump to pump uphill to the tank

  5. #5

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    We are talking about boats.
    Rule number 1 for boats: eventually everything will break.
    Any preparation and planning for when that happens is a good idea.

    I carry a porta-potty rather than plumbing in a marine head.
    I can't come to bed right now honey - somebody on the internet is wrong.

    When you believe in things you don't understand, then you suffer . . . " - Stevie Wonder

  6. #6
    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Maast,

    Keeping things simple is a good idea. The thing to watch is that the new good idea does not have just a different set of problems that you will encounter after you get it installed. My concern would be how do you avoid clogs in this system, and what do you do if it does clog? In a traditional system you have a maciator pump which can grind things up to some degree and push them out with force. Is this system just gravity feed to dump?

    Jim

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fishbob View Post
    We are talking about boats.
    Rule number 1 for boats: eventually everything will break.
    Any preparation and planning for when that happens is a good idea.

    I carry a porta-potty rather than plumbing in a marine head.
    Sorry Maast no ideas for that - I assume you take the wife and good for you if you do. I'm in the same school of thinking as fishbob but I took out my porta-potty and carry a 5 gallon bucket with a toilet seat to be used on the aft deck - everyone just look the other way!!

  8. #8

    Thumbs up 5 gallon bucket

    Quote Originally Posted by bushboy View Post
    Sorry Maast no ideas for that - I assume you take the wife and good for you if you do. I'm in the same school of thinking as fishbob but I took out my porta-potty and carry a 5 gallon bucket with a toilet seat to be used on the aft deck - everyone just look the other way!!
    Works great, never leaks.
    We never really grow up, we only learn
    how to act in public

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