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Thread: Adak Reference Photos 1

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Default Adak Reference Photos 1

    Here are some photos from Adak from early June 1984.



    This is the East side of Lake Betty about 3/4 of the way down the shore.



    This is Lake Betty looking North towards Finger bay from half way up the ridge to Gannet Pass. The previous photo was taken on the spit of land to the right where the "island" connects to the shore.



    This is from the top of Gannet Pass looking east to Thumb and Scabbard Bays. If you drop down and go east from Gannet you will end up on the drainage into Thumb Bay (good sea run dollies in July).



    This also from the top of Gannet Pass looking West to Constantine Harbor. What you see is the top of a large bench on the ridge slope and the main valley is below this bench out of view.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    so was the old barge still grounded in scabbard bay? we would catch dollys while dad walked up the hill and hunt bou.. as well both thumb and little thumb bays .... once we had to walk back to town. from one of out outings, in the boat. i can remember feeding fox on the walk and mom and dad trying to make it fun... i also remember never beeing so happy to get home.
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    Default Adak Refernce Photos 2



    This is west shore of Gannet Lake headed to the pass that leads to Teardrop Lake.



    This is the pass over into Teardrop Lake.



    Coming down the slope into Teardrop Lake. We are still about 500 feet in elevation above the lake shore but it is a really shallow slope at this point. Looking up to the top of the ridge you can see that there are a couple of choices about what appears to be a pass through the rocks. Out of view to the right is a large steep canyon that you keep on your right on the way back up and take the easiest route and you will come out right back at the lowest pass.



    This is looking west towards the area that leads to Bay of Waterfalls and the western pennisula of the Island.

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    Default Adak Refernce Photos 3



    This is the end of Long Lake between Teardrop and Hidden Bay. This is the last day of the hike and the weather has turned to normal - 20 mph winds and driving rain. Lucky for us the wind was coming from the north which just happened to be the way we were headed. First generation Gore-tex was not water proof this day.



    And this is why you guys want to go out there - a meat caribou at 80 yards straight up hill which should roll half way down to camp. Season was closed for calving and the only gun was the .38 service revolver that the MP was carrying in his pack. He ran out of shells shooting at ptarmigan on the first day.

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    Default barge

    Vince I don't know what is still in Scabbard Bay. I never made it over there when I lived there. I have not been back since 1993 when I was working on some of the environmental stuff. Chances are the barge would still be there since nobody has the money or desire to clean stuff like that up.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    any one headed out there needs a fishing pole... off the beach or in the creek. the sea run dollys are awsome. kelp bass. and salmon...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    I dont' think there is a stream on the island that does not have dollies in it. The ones below the falls out of Long Lake were black and we could not see them until we tossed some sea run dolly eggs on a hook and pulled out a bunch for dinner.

    We did a bioassy study of the fish in the stream below the White Alice dump and the kid that was running the shocker came back one after noon with a bull dolly that was about 3 pounds and asked "is this a big one?" This was a fresh water fish and not a sea run so it must have been older than the hills.

    In Thumb bay it was always a race to see which dolly hit the eggs first. After about the first 6 fish there were just the 10 inchers or less left and we would move on to another spot.

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    I can't thank you enough! Really helps to be able to see what I'm looking at on the map. I'll be sure to post pictures when I get back.

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    Default fishing

    Nice pictures. What would a good fly be to catch some of those Dollys?

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    The native dollies are starving most of the year so they will hit anything that looks like food - egg patterns might work well. We typically used fresh eggs from pinks. Most of the native dollies are about 10 inches long, but most holes held one or two monsters that hit the bait first.

    Sea run dollies feed on shrimp a lot so anything that looks like that with some flash might work ok. Due to the wind we mostly used spinners and small silver spoons in salt water. It was too hard to cast a fly rod most of the time on the beaches.

    The very first sea run dollie I caught out there was chasing shrimp in about 10 feet of water and a shrimp ended up snagged on my treble hook on the spoon. The fish hit it hard and I didn't know about the shrimp until I beached the fish. We were wading in 4 feet of water to reach the deeper stuff off the mouth of NAVFAC creek.

    The dollies were mostly in schools of 5 to 15 fish and came in a month before the pinks and staid most of the summer eating pinks. At the time I didn't know much about AK fishing so I just stuck to what worked in NV. Now I would try some flash flys or sculpin patterns anything that looked like a fry or shrimp. Heavy shooting head and a rod that can deal with the wind.

    In the creeks I would try small egg patterns or see what type of insects were in there and see what they hit.

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    Default camping

    thanks for the fishing ideas. when camping was it hard to find areas sheltered from the wind? Or can you usually find somewhere dry enough and protected? When the wind blows is it usually in one direction or does it change throughout the day?

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildwilderness View Post
    thanks for the fishing ideas. when camping was it hard to find areas sheltered from the wind? Or can you usually find somewhere dry enough and protected? When the wind blows is it usually in one direction or does it change throughout the day?

    LOL as a kid we got days off school because the winds quit, the sun was out and the same time.... Dad would come home from the comsta as well..

    Adak is known as the birth place of the winds...average mean temp is 40deg. also.


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    Quote Originally Posted by wildwilderness View Post
    thanks for the fishing ideas. when camping was it hard to find areas sheltered from the wind? Or can you usually find somewhere dry enough and protected? When the wind blows is it usually in one direction or does it change throughout the day?

    As Vince said when the wind stopped we were given a day off to enjoy it. Sunshine liberty - everyone not on duty/watch had the day or afternoon off. It happend about three times a year while I was there.

    Some of the nicest weather is late august to late september (storms have longer calm periods between them that might last a day and the rain might fall more vertically at times), other than that period count on it being windy and rainy most of the time with gusts and driving rain. When it is not windy and rainy it is foggy which makes hiking terrian you don't know really fun.

    In some of the ridges you can find gullies that will offer protection from a really bad blow but they may have a small stream running on their bottom so you won't have much room to camp.

    A modern dome tent that can be used for mountainering will work well. Take a good ground sheet to keep the tundra water from seeping up into the floor.

    Anything that can blow away will so make sure you always tie things down or keep them stuffed into something heavier.

    One of the things that I keep forgetting to mention are the holes in the tundra covered by vegetation. Parts of Adak are covered by a volcanic soil - the slopes of Mt Moffet are classic pyroclastic ash flow soil - which is easily eroded but consolidated and competent enough to create vertical side walls. These soils lead to 1 to 2 foot wide gullies that can be up to 20 feet deep. Most are not that deep and their bottoms are on an ash layer that has decomposed into a clay forming an aquitard layer for a stream base. What you will encounter on the sides of the mountains are gullies that come and go much like a limestone cave system in the midwest - just on a smaller scale. You will find "sink" holes big enough to swallow a car or just you. These things are easy to see in the spring and fall, but during the summer when the grass is high and green you can step right into one.

    The story told by one of the SAR guys during the blue card lecture (safety training for hiking in the old days) was a guy was walking his lab up on Moffet above the ski lodge and the dog ran off and never came back. They spent a week looking for him and never found the dog. The next weekend someone was hiking in the same area and kept hearing a dog barking, but could not see the dog. They called or whistled and the dog barked and they eventually walked themselves into the dog. It was in a sink hole about 8 feet deep and 3 feet around with a little stream running through the bottom. The dog had been eating nothing but drinking well for 6 to 7 days until pulled out.

    During this lecture they also told of a missing hiker from the 1970's whose body was never found. He is supposed to be the only missing person never recovered by the old Navy/Marine/USFWS SAR team. On one of the other Adak threads I wrote of one of the hunting/lost in a storm SARs out there in the early 1990's. You should find that thread and read it to keep things in mind for your trip out there.

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    Default fire

    My experience in Adak was that fire with local materials is not an option. On some of the beaches along Kagalaska straights you could find buoys or driftwood, but bay of islands didn't have any beaches or anything flammable in it. Up on the hills dry grass is a great thought, but can't be found. Expect to get wet and stay wet, if camping in a tent. Wear layers that will wick water off your body and dry out at night inside your sleeping bag. Good raingear to keep from getting too well soaked. I spent a cold night out with a buddy, with no shelter other than a couple garbage bags- we found shelter against a small hill and pulled some grass over the top of us to help shed the rain. We used our packs and two game bags of meat to hold the edges down. With the plastic draped over us, and the hill at our back, we stayed relatively dry and almost warm; even managed to sleep a little!

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    Default pics

    Never tried to load any pics here but if they show up here are a couple of pics from Gannet Pass (first one facing North, 2nd facing south). Thanks for posting your pictures, kinda interesting I have many almost identical pics from 23 years later. These were in Aug of 2007, it rained some every day and when it wasnt raining it was foggy or overcast except for a few hours the fifth day the sun came out. Always windy...
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    I do have to Thank you for the Photos. they are bringing back some really great memories. we had a house fire in 2003 and lost all the albums of us as kids on the boat, my dad in his navy horn rims, with his rugs and antlers from the Bou Hunts out there... Tons of memories about our weekends to Scabbard and thumb bays. picking sand dollars off the beaches, and Finding one giant squid washed up. it was huge!!!!

    Hooligan on the beaches with a flash light and the beach bonfires as every one lined up to catch them.

    For those in the Talkeetna cut off area... the folks who opened the grocery store.. Lisa and her brother Ron, were there along side our family.. and Ronnie was the big Brother i never had. taught me to catch flounder off the dock at the end of the small boat harbor. and how to pull bass out of the kelp. and that bow hunting Ptarmis was harder then it looked!!!!


    tossing shrimp nets off the rock jetty and helping mom and dad pick them out. NOT to mention the commercial crabbers boycotting the industry and selling us all Kings at .50 each... the block parties of boiling crab was something. and building snow caves along the drift fences along the roads... LOL we had entire communities in them....


    Thanks Guys for the great memories!!!!
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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