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Thread: Prepping Brass?

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Default Prepping Brass?

    Any thought on seating your primers in prepped brass and storing in plastic bags for later use?

    I generally prep brass in my spare time and store it for later use. I was thinking about seating the primers and storing to speed up the loading process.

    Just wondering if anyone else does this and if there is a problem with moisture while storing in plastic bags. It's pretty dry down here in AZ.

    Also, I noticed that some companies sell prepped and primed cases retail.

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    Priming cases is probably the easiest part of the reloading process, for me anyways. I don't like the thought of pre-priming cases, but that's just me.

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    I agree, it's very easy. I was just wondering if anyone has run into problems with storing pre-primed brass for any period of time. I'm just looking for a short cut to loading when the time presents it's self.

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    I've seen pre-primed brass for sale in ziplocks, I don't see any problem with it.

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    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marshall View Post
    Any thought on seating your primers in prepped brass and storing in plastic bags for later use?

    I generally prep brass in my spare time and store it for later use. I was thinking about seating the primers and storing to speed up the loading process.

    Just wondering if anyone else does this and if there is a problem with moisture while storing in plastic bags. It's pretty dry down here in AZ.

    Also, I noticed that some companies sell prepped and primed cases retail.
    both remington & winchester (among others), offer primed brass for sale. if stored properly without contamination that would kill a primer, such as oil, solvents, etc it should be fine for years. a sealed plastic bag or container is just fine.
    happy trails.
    jh

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    I prep my brass after returning from the range. I size, trim, and prime then store in a durable plastic case. I do not see much advantage to the plastic primer tray with card board sleeve they come in over my storage boxes. I do keep everything inside the house and away from any moisture/elements. I have loaded the same primed brass at the range under a built lean-to cover while raining with no noticible difference. I say try it, any problems quit.

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    My work, wife and kids schedule leaves limited time for reloading. I generally spend about half of one of my days off in the shop working on loads and half of the next day at the range recording results.

    Currently I'm loading and testing for 13 rifles, only 3 are mine. Five of these are dialed in and the others are getting close. I think I'm going to give the prep and store thing a try. If I have any problems I'll stop.

    Thanks for the thoughts...

  8. #8

    Default Suggest Label for Primed Brass

    The only thing I would suggest is to be sure and label the primed brass with the manufacturer and type of primer used. I also label the brass with the number of times it has been fired. Then I store in Ziploc bags. I have loaded stuff that was primed two years before, with no problems. (Marshall, based on information I have seen here, you probably already do this).

    Best Regards,
    Jim
    Last edited by midnightsunfun; 03-03-2009 at 09:07. Reason: Added note.

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    I have done it and worked fine. I just put the empty primer box in the bag so I know what it's got in it.

    Andy

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    I have done it and worked fine. I just put the empty primer box in the bag so I know what it's got in it.

    Andy
    Sounds like a good idea...

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    You could always store the primers in a cabinet with one of those dessicant thingies ...you know, the little black plastic bowl with a black mesh thing full of white dessicant powder in it (sorry for my lack of terminology)? They sell these, and the refills, at all sporting goods stores. I keep one in each of my gun safes, but have never worried about primers/powder in the garage reloading bench cabinets.

    Brian

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    I prime prepped brass, sometimes, and sometimes not. I just prepped 82 cases, but didn't prime them.

    Like they say, record the primer type if you do. I only use CCI, but I like to know if the Primer is Magnum or not.

    I store prepped brass in boxes, and sometimes Ziplocs, BUT if I store it Primed, I don't want them flopping around loose in a bag, because of safety reasons. That's a bigger issue to me than moisture.

    I've never worried about contamination, or moisture effecting primers. It's almost impossible to disable a primer anyway, even with Oil or Solvent. They will dry out and still go Boom.

    Try it sometime.

    Put a few primers cup up, and put oil in some, and water in some. Wait a few days for them to dry and try them. You won't have to wait long for the ones that you watered.

    Smitty of the North
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    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

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    Ocasionally I will prime a few hundred rounds of prepped brass and it last for years.

    In order to avoid getting the stink-eye from my lovely bride, I need to occasionally watch some sort of chick-flick or other such nonsense.

    I take a big bag of prepped brass and a couple trays of primers into the living room along with my old hand priming tool. It is a one at a time old RCBS without the primer tray gizmo.

    During a two hour movie you can primer 500-600 rounds if it has richard Gere in it..... Maybe 200 if it has Clint Eastwood.

    Anyway, I then put the primer tray sleeve in the bag along with the primed brass. So I know what type of primers are seated.

    When I come up with an idea for a new load experiment, I run into the shop and load up ten rounds of each type of primer with whatever bullet and powder charge I want to try.

    I use small sandwich bags which are labeled for the range. I put the spent brass back into each labeled bag so I can look it over with a magnifying glass when I get home and type up the velocity/ group results for each load.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

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    Default You guys load a lot more than i do

    I ususally clean and prep my brass when I get home from the range then put it away until I want to load ! But I am seldon loading more than 200 rounds at a sitting ! Plus I am using a single stage press ! It doesnt take me long to prime 100 brass with my little lee hand tool ! But you guys have me thinking now ! thanks Kevin

  15. #15

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    A couple of years back I found a few boxes of .357 brass I had primed in the mid 80's and never loaded. It had been stored away in the back of the garage for years. I loaded them up with some H110 and they all worked perfectly. Chronograph numbers were in line with the load used and little variation between loads.

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    Perhaps I was inspired by this thread, or was it the inspiring people who frequent this forum?

    Anyways, I just finished prepping 100 each, R-P 30-30 cases.

    * Sized, (without lubing, because the die barely touches anything on new brass anyhow, and it rounds out the neck for the succeeding operations.)

    * Deburred the primer pockets.

    * Uniformed the primer pockets.

    * Trimmed them to 2.028 length.

    * Chamfered the outside of the neck edges.

    * Chamfered the inside of the neck edges.

    * Belled the neck mouths for seating Cast Bullets.

    I accomplished all this in a matter of DAYs.
    Well, that durn puppy wouldn't leave me alone.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

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