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Thread: Game is Food

  1. #1
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    Default Game is Food

    Reading Stranger's February Females thread once again reminded me that Alaska's game animals are food. Many forget that hunting originated as a way to get food, not to get your name in some kind of a record book.

    In that vein, I'm starting a thread dedicated to the notion that Game is Food! Your pictures are welcome. I'm gonna start it off with pictures of a deer meat hunt some friends made a few years ago. Some of the animals were killed by proxy for some of the local elders and some for the hunters themselves. Then they were processed and delivered. Soon after we had a couple parties in which game meat and seafood were prominently featured. That's what it's all about.

    This will be pic heavy and require a few posts.

    First, a couple pickups loads of deer are brought from the boat to the shed for skinning.
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    After skinning, the deer are taken to a garage for butchering.
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    Deer get cut and some made into burger.
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    The hearts and the finished product.
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    Now the good part! Ribs simmering on the wood stove, and a plate featuring the ribs and a Thai (spicy) venison salad.
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    Next on the menue is Corned Moose Brisket and Corned Deer Shoulder.
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    Seafood, King Crab and Shrimp
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    Can't forget the salmon. Made into lox and pickled.
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    Two kinds of meatballs made with moose meat, and crab stuffed mushrooms..........man, My mouth is watering remembering all this stuff.
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    Default Game is Food

    We'll finish up with some local Oysters on on the Barbi.

    The bounty of Alaska.
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    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
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    What time should I be over your house for dinner?

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    heres how we do it last falls moose... ignore the date stamp i never know when it will say it is...funny thing how those cameras work after being dumped in a creek
    Last edited by Vince; 06-28-2009 at 18:44.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    i do the boning and cutting the kids do the chopping and grinding and then there are the beggers at the gate that want to help.... lil one just had her first bday few weeks back.. and still wants in on all the fun.
    Last edited by Vince; 06-28-2009 at 18:44.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Vince,that's really awsome that you get your kids involved!Too bad more parents don't do the same.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Good thread, twodux. Although I savor the meat from every harvest, this thread brought to mind three somewhat recent hunts where the primary memory is focused on the meat the kill provided. The first two are from when my sister had cancer. She went through three years of near continual treatment, and during two of those years she had Tier II caribou permits. Going through chemo and radiation during one year, and flying down to San Francisco every other week for a clinical trial the next, she physically could not go afield herself. In addition, she has three kids to feed, so having a freezer of healthy, clean meat was of particular importance to her. Apart from the money issue (which was huge), her digestive system couldn't handle beef or chicken due to the chemicals contained within them. A stomach on chemo is a picky beast, so I went to get her a caribou those two falls. I don't know that I ever posted the pics here, as neither animal was much to brag about with regards to size. The first year all I could find was a cow. I wanted to find her a larger animal, but in the end it came down to what was there and what would put food on her table. On a cool sidenote, this was the first caribou hunt my wife accompanied me on, and it was a wonderful experience for the two of us.






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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    The next fall I went back up for my sister to find another caribou. On my second day afield the atv I had borrowed died, and I had to be towed back to my truck. I was obviously disappointed, but decided to drive up the road a few miles to see if I couldn't spot anything close to the highway. I spotted a few white spots about three miles off the road across a trailless, swampy expanse. With 4 hours of daylight left, I decided to give it a shot. Right when I was about to give up (as I was down low and didn't have much for visibility), I jumped a group of 5 cows and this one small bull. My first shot caught him in the heart, but I didn't know that and fired again. Oops! My second shot went through his antler when I led him too much, but it didn't matter. A quick butcher job, an anter sawed in half due to the new regulations, and two packs out to the road and my sister's freezer was full again.






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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    The following year my friend, wife, sister, and mother all drew the Delta cow moose permits. One weekend I took my friend, who had up until that point not been a hunter. He is, however, quite a chef and was interested in having a supply of meat in his freezer. When he drew the permit we talked a lot and practiced at the range, but of course there is nothing you can do to prepare for the first time you take a life. When he took his moose he was at first very quiet. I asked him how he felt, and he said he was OK...but it was certainly a reflective moment for him. A half hour later when we got our gear and finally started skinning the moose, though, he began to gain a greater appreciation for what he had done. Pulling the skin back, he kept remarking about what meals each cut would be good for. At the end of the day, he told me that he wasn't troubled any longer - the moose was meat, and lots of it.





    The last one was back in Delta a week later, this time with my family. We took two moose within 15 minutes of leaving the parking lot. It was not a challenge, but it was meat. To make it better, it was a family effort, with my wife, sister, sister-in-law, brother, mother, and nephew all there helping. I loved that this was my nephew's first experience on a big game hunt, as he got to help put food on the table by being a part of the process of caring for it.




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    Vince and Brian, Thanks for the pix! Everybody seems to want to get the big males, but the cows and does and spikes make great eating. I'm never sorry when I get one. I measure my hunting success by how full my freezer is at the end of the season.

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    twodux - Yeah, my wife has told me that she'll be disappointed if I come home with a large bull moose. She likes the taste of the spikes so much that she'd rather I target the little ones.

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    Excellent pots Todux!
    I actually saw you up untill the 4th post and I went to a wedding and came back to join you!!! Meat is the "Word"
    Brian and Vince are right there too.
    Picking out the fat ones and poppin' 'em in the head......in the back grond is a Bull headed our way 1/2 way across teh River...LOL! but we watched him blast into the willows with interest.

    Saving the choice parts from the insides and extra fat, intestins for sausage

    Hang them up and peel thehides as we need meat. Keeping the hide on protects the meat from "freezer Burn"

    Cutting up any during warm weather is a good idea to preserve the meat with no loss.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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