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Thread: Replacing Wood Stock Options??

  1. #1

    Default Replacing Wood Stock Options??

    I am looking into replacing the wood stock on my model 700 BDL (300winmag)with some type of synthetic stock. I am not a huge fan of the asthetics of synthetics but understand the importance of having a stock that will hold up to the elements of Alaska. I am looking for some good places to start my research. If anyone would be willing to shed some light on the subject or provide any websites I could visit it would be appreciated. I am sure all synthetics are not created equal both in weight and durability. I have heard good things about kevlar stocks. Are these one of the better styles? Does anyone know a place in the Anchorage area that carries this type of stock? I am guessing this is going to turn into a custom deal.

    Thanks,

    TT

  2. #2
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    I'm considering doing the same thing with a Ruger 7x57 I have. I've looked at the Bell & Carlson website and they have a few options available. The Hogue overmolded is another. I've got one of those on a Mini-14 and it works pretty good. There are a few other custom options (MacMillan, Lone Wolf, H&S, etc.) that I've looked at, but am not prepared to spend their asking prices. I guess it all depends on how much you want to spend.

  3. #3
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Composite stocks can be broken into two basic groups. The first group are the injection molded stocks. These are what are used on most factory rifles, and inexspensive replacement stocks. A mold is made, and the plastic is injected into the mold, sometimes with some metal inserts added. The upside of these stocks is they are inexspensive. The downside is they are from moderately heavy to heavy, and they lack rigidity. It is not uncommon to be able to flex the forend of these stocks a good 1/4" with your off hand if you put some pressure into it. Theoretically these flimsy stocks should not allow a rifle to shoot accurately, but I've found rifles with stiff barrels to shoot fairly well in these stocks. I would hesitate to use them on a rifle with a light contour barrel.

    The next class of stocks are what is called a hand layed up stock. This is similar to how a surfboard is made, albeit inside out. Epoxy resin is used to saturate fiberglass, kevlar and or carbon fiber laminates. Then a foam filler is added inside the laminate shell. These stocks can be very light, and also quite stiff. Because of the labor involved they are much more expensive. The upside is each one is essentially custom made, so they can be easily tailered to different stock lengths and barrel channels.

    A wood stock can certainly hold up to the elements of Alaska so long as it is properly sealed. I would only replace your wood stock with a higher quality synthetic stock.

  4. #4

    Default Great Info!

    Thanks for the info guys. I agree with buying a good stock if I am going to change. However, the more you start spending on a new stock the easier it becomes to justify a new rifle!!! It is a hard decision but with a little research I am sure I will figure out what route I will go.

    Paul H, when you talk of sealing the wood stock, what do you mean? Is there something more you can do to the facotry seal that will make it more weatherproof?

    TT

  5. #5

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    You could always find a factory take off synthetic stock to replace your wood one. I replaced my old Bell and Carlson stock that was on my 270 with a factory synthetic stock and it works just fine. You could do the same and have your wood stock sealed like Paul H said and then you will have a backup if something ever happened to the one on your rifle.

  6. #6
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The way I've been taught to seel a stock, and it can't be done to one that is already finished, is to saturate the all wood with epoxy, then sand down and finish as you like.

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