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Thread: Bone saw questions

  1. #1
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    Default Bone saw questions

    I busted my saw last weekend, so I'm in the market again. I wonder has anyone used the Gerber EZ Saw II? It looks like a good design, but wonder if it is long enough to saw off skullcap of moose. Or even sheep.

    I shied away from the Gerber folding saw because they sell replacement blades. To me that means its weak from the get-go. I want something thats strong.

    I have a Sawvivor folding saw and find it too bulky for walk-ins. Good for motorized hunts.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks, HH

  2. #2
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    Default Re: saws

    I don't have any positive recomendations, but I'd stay away from Meyerco Folding Saws. I used one just recently, and I'm not terribly impressed with it. I ended up getting out the hatchet to get through tough spots, because the saw wasn't hacking it (no pun intended).

  3. #3
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    Default Gerber folder

    Mine is in use year-round and I haven't replaced a blade yet. Light, depenable, and it works. One blade is a little bent, but I can be done sawing the ribs off a 'bou by the time my buddy has his Wyoming saw together.

  4. #4
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Default

    mine is the out door edge you get in the Kodi pack... going on 8 years and way to many animals... it is a little tough to use with my big hands but it is light, packable with your blades and zips right through it all. last year alone was 3 bear, 5 moose and 4 caribou, i have yet to find another that works as well...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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  5. #5
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    Default

    my foldable packsaw has a frame, and it's a daisy (GOOD), but maybe a little "weighty". the length allows hardware store blade replacements (VERY GOOD).

    i recieved a folding gerber in a dandy camo pouch for christmas. it includes extra blades and seems like a strong little outfit. the extra blades, or their availability means your saw can be in use for years to come. if you like the saw....that's a plus.

    one thing to remember with the blade type one hand saws....blades are thin and can be bent if forced through heavy material. working slow they are the cats *****.

    happy trails.
    jh
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  6. #6
    Member dieNqvrs's Avatar
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    Default they are great

    I have the gerber with the bone and wood saw blades that come in the black pouch. The wood blade cruises through willow/alder beautifully. The bone portion works great on smaller animals deer and elk but have never tried it on a moose or a sheep. I don't don't think you can go wrong with the gerber. If you are hard on gear get an extra blade for it for down the road.

  7. #7
    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Default Moose Camp Saw

    I go with the Wyoming Saw with the 11" blade. It's a little heavy, but with a meat and wood saw blade, it makes for a real handy tool in camp. It all folds into a handy little storage case, that fits in your back/day pack side pocket

    Browning used to make a saw like the Wyoming, but about half the weight. It was/is an awesome saw, if you can find one. They are great.
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  8. #8
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    I use a "compass saw" from the hardware store, with fine wood teeth. It's way lighter in weight than a wyoming saw. It's worked for a moose skullcap and a muley skullcap so far. Blade is replaceable. Good luck trying to use a wyoming saw or other bow-type saw on a moose skull - the skull is too doggone wide to get a good saw stroke.

  9. #9
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    I use a "compass saw" from the hardware store, with fine wood teeth. It's way lighter in weight than a wyoming saw. It's worked for a moose skullcap and a muley skullcap so far. Blade is replaceable. Good luck trying to use a wyoming saw or other bow-type saw on a moose skull - the skull is too doggone wide to get a good saw stroke.
    you are right there!

    i used to carry a small oregon folding saw. worked like a champ but too short for serious work.
    happy trails.
    jh

  10. #10
    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    Default

    I have used a Wyoming II saw for years. It is great. Full size bone blade a a tree blade. Love to have it. Comes in a camo case that can be worn like a belt.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  11. #11

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    I used the Gerber folding style on Kodiak for Deer, help up enought to do two deer, but the blade was way to dull to do the third. I didn't use it to skull cape off as I knew it wouldnt work well. Blades are too flimzy for that.

    Steveo

  12. #12

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    20" Wyoming saw, love it. Not a sheep hunting saw by any means but it works perfectly and has no trouble going through a moose skull, even a BIG moose. The longer the blade, the longer the cutting stroke, therefore less effort to cut through something.

    If weight is not a major concern I highly recommend the 20" Wyoming.

  13. #13
    Member jdb3's Avatar
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    I agree with 338WM, the Wyoming saw is the only way to go. I've tried most over the years but this is the only saw I, or my hunting partners, use. JIm

  14. #14
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    Default Bone Saws

    You might want to take a look at "dandy" brand saws. I have used the half-dandy for moose & elk and it is very good. A little big but attaches nice to the outside of your pack. Just do an internet search for Dandy Saws..

  15. #15
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    Default

    Small, lightweight, tough, and faster cutting than the designer saws targeted at hunters. I've turned several guys onto these and I don't know a single one who's ever gone back to folding saws.


  16. #16

    Default gerbers

    You definately have to baby the gerbers. IME the plastic body will fail long before you've gone through several replacement blades. I wouldnt carry anything heavier in my backpack though.

  17. #17

    Default SAW

    There is a handle at Home Depot. You use it to hold a Sawz-All blade. Stick the blade shank into the handle and tighten the screw. It allows you to use different blade lengths and and tooth patterns. The blades are cheaper and stronger than Gerbers or Wyomings; less weight too.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

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  18. #18
    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    Default Gerber...

    I have used two different models of Gerber. One of them the blade was too flimsy, and the handle didn't seem real tough. I lost that one, so I bought a different Gerber. It is a little heavier, but seems a lot tougher. Worked perfectly to saw the skull cap off a sheep last year. It is the same one that pinehavensredrocket posted a picture of. I would recommend something like the one Mr. Pid posted for cutting up a moose, since (hopefully) you won't have to pack it too far anyway

    I will be taking my Gerber on my sheep hunt this year.

  19. #19

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    I used this gerber saw last year with great results. I dropped the 9" "wood saw" blade out due to the fact that the 20" chainsaw blade will to all that and more and also dropped the carrying case as well to save weight. The 9" bone saw had no problem cutting off the antlers off my wife moose last year much better than the wyoming saw I have used in years past on moose and caribou antlers. And on a caribou backpack hunt last fall it was nice to buck up some wood for a campfire and the 20" chainsaw with extension made quick work of a bunch of dead fall trees. Anyways, its worked well for me. Good luck.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Small, lightweight, tough, and faster cutting than the designer saws targeted at hunters. I've turned several guys onto these and I don't know a single one who's ever gone back to folding saws.

    GREATEST camp saw ever designed! (I love them!)
    Joe (Ak)

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