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Thread: Bent front site

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Default Bent front site

    How do you fix this problem? Its a mod. 629 (older gun) S&M 44.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rock_skipper View Post
    How do you fix this problem? Its a mod. 629 (older gun) S&M 44.

    Reverse the proceedure used to make that problem. I'd use a brass hammer or a heavy brass punch and strike it smartly after anchoring the barrel solidly in a vise. This assumes the sight is fixed and not pinned. Hamilton Bowen, and possibly others, can mill off that sight and mill a slot into the ramp to take replacement blades for the Wiegand sights. This might be an option and a chance to customize and repair. I've had this done a few times and it gives the option of different height sights and also different colored inserts, if you lean that way.
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    How does it shoot?

    Maybe someone did it on purpose, to adjust the sights.

    If that's not the case, support the base of the sight, and pound away. Just don't force it. Use a bigger hammer.

    Elmer Keith would say.... I've straightened out MANY bent fronts sights using Stanleys fine hammers, and .....

    I've been reading Gun Notes again. Sorry.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rock_skipper View Post
    How do you fix this problem? Its a mod. 629 (older gun) S&M 44.
    this is a little more complicated than just striking the sight....... you see, on a fixed sight revolver (for example) point of impact is adjusted by that method.

    if the sight is pinned, remove it, place on a supporting surface and peen it gently with a brass or bronze rod.

    if the sight is fixed, support the barrel flat, and sight base (flat not in a vice , and tap with a brass or bronze rod as necessary. don't over do it, and take your time. it will turn out great.

    good luck and

    happy trails.
    jh
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    Thanks guys for the info. Bought the gun like this and with the back site all the way over, it still shoots about 8" to the right. That said it is a fixed site, and it is about 1/8" thick. Just did'nt want to start beating the heck out of it and have it snap off on me

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rock_skipper View Post
    Thanks guys for the info. Bought the gun like this and with the back site all the way over, it still shoots about 8" to the right. That said it is a fixed site, and it is about 1/8" thick. Just did'nt want to start beating the heck out of it and have it snap off on me
    you may not be able to (or want to) do this yourself but........impact change on a fixed sight gun is easy. i learned this technique in the repair center at ruger, in the armorers program. HOWEVER you must "deadstrike" the barrel-sight opposite the direction the bullet is to go. to move the bullet right, strike left. to move left, strike right.

    a lead mallet is necessary to "deadstrike". steel or other metals will not do. the idea here is to move the barrel incrementally, and it is surprising how easy this is.

    the whole proceedure takes longer to explain than to accomplish, usually one or two "taps" will be ample.

    good luck.
    happy trails.
    jh

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    Just a heads up, but make sure the barrel isn't rotated on the threads. Pounding on the front sight may not be the correct solution to your problem. I've seen more than one revolver from different mfg's that did not have the barrel screwed in all the way or too far. Carefully examine the revolver to make sure this isn't the cause. If it is, find someone with a frame wrench and barrel vise to correct it or send it back to S&W. Fast service and cheap shipping. Lifetime warranties are the best if you need one. Good luck!

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    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunbugs View Post
    Just a heads up, but make sure the barrel isn't rotated on the threads. Pounding on the front sight may not be the correct solution to your problem. I've seen more than one revolver from different mfg's that did not have the barrel screwed in all the way or too far. Carefully examine the revolver to make sure this isn't the cause. If it is, find someone with a frame wrench and barrel vise to correct it or send it back to S&W. Fast service and cheap shipping. Lifetime warranties are the best if you need one. Good luck!
    gunbugs; i have never seen a revolver barrel "screwed in (or) out too far" and as a police armorer worked on lots of guns. come to think of it, at the factory schools that was never a problem either. "my solution" IS the factory remedy for a problem as described. obviously without actually seeing the revolver in question, i can't comment to the accuracy of the authors description.

    headspace is another issue requiring a different remedy.
    happy trails.
    jh

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    While I have never seen this problem on a revolver, I have owned four FAL's that had timing issues with the barrels. If the barrel screws in, there shouldn't be any reason not to at least consider it.
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    I was never a "police armorer", however I did work full time at a retail establishment for over 20 years as a "gunsmith". Both phrases are a little loaded with prejudice. I can't say exactly how many revolvers I've either sent back to the mfg. or taken care of myself, but in that time, probably in excess of 20 that had improperly installed bbls. Our good buddies at Colt were the most common culprits, also S&W and a fair number of single action rugers. Just speaking from years of practical hands on experience. Worked on, (and fixed) thousands of various types af firearms over the years. Generally keep my mouth shut if I don't think I can add to the conversation. Good Luck! GUNBUGS

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    Quote Originally Posted by gunbugs View Post
    I was never a "police armorer", however I did work full time at a retail establishment for over 20 years as a "gunsmith". Both phrases are a little loaded with prejudice. I can't say exactly how many revolvers I've either sent back to the mfg. or taken care of myself, but in that time, probably in excess of 20 that had improperly installed bbls. Our good buddies at Colt were the most common culprits, also S&W and a fair number of single action rugers. Just speaking from years of practical hands on experience. Worked on, (and fixed) thousands of various types af firearms over the years. Generally keep my mouth shut if I don't think I can add to the conversation. Good Luck! GUNBUGS
    hi gunbugs; you put quotes around "police armorer" in a disrespectful way, and as to phrases loaded with prejudice (?) i have no idea what you are talking about.....did you bother to read my early reply where i explained exactly how to correct the problem?
    happy trails.
    jh

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    Note that GUNBUGS also used quotes around his own title "gunsmith". So any disrespect was simultaneously self-effacing.

    Pinehavensredrocket's advice was spot on for the problem of a bent front sight.

    GUNBUGS tried to alert the original poster to the possibility of a different problem that can be misdiagnosed as a bent front sight.

    Everyone is trying to be helpful here. I think if we were all chatting about this in person, with the revolver in front of us, the conversation would go smoother.

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