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Thread: Scarpa Boots??

  1. #1
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default Scarpa Boots??

    Sittin' here bored with nothing to complain about cause i had a couple clients draw tags and thinking about my feet.
    Buddy gave me his old pair of Koflachs(in tough shape) so i did some looking and came up with scarpa's. For the money they are right there with the mendiels i wear now. Since i'm gonna be leaning into more goat hunting than sheep i wanted to hear your guys thoughts on these boots.
    Interested in the black pair with the rocker sole for better walking. how are plastic boots overall?
    Last edited by BRWNBR; 02-22-2009 at 20:20. Reason: stihl leerning howe two sphel
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    The main thing is that the shell fits your foot. Whether it be Koflach, Scarpa, Lowa or some other. For my feet the Koflachs don't fit, to wide in the heel and narrow in the toe. But, the Lowa Civettas fit perfect. I bought them from Shoebuy.com so they came with a 30 day return policy and free shipping both ways. If the plastics don't fit out of the box then they will never fit. I like mine for the rugged terrain but they aren't as nice to hike in on approaches. The fore/aft stiffness does not bother me that much. But, what I notice is the lateral "forces". Like walking up a river bed on round rock. As the boot rolls to the side all the force is transferred to the lower leg which pushes the knee out or in. This is because the ankles are so stiff. I think it does make my knees a little tired. It's actually not a problem though, it's a feature! Leather boots will give some, the plastics are not supposed to. Now, in steep rugged stuff, with a heavy pack, scree, side hilling, edging, etc. I really like them. I do notice some discomfort above my ankles after a few days because, once again, force is transferred to the upper part of the boot. I talked to someone around here who lines the upper part of the shell with neoprene for a little padding, I may try that. But, with a leather boot side hilling you get ankle roll. It's worse when the leather is wet since it's soft. I like my Civettas but do not see them as a replacement for my old Soloman leathers which I need to replace this year, should have bought 2 or 3 pair 5 years ago. A guy needs both. I'm considering trying some of these Merrel Expedition They have a plastic lateral support in the upper and a nice sticky sole. One thing I don't like about the Civettas is the generic Vibram sole. The ContraGrip sole on my Solomans stick like glue, especially wet river rocks. I've had to adjust to that with the Vibrams.

    Merrel Expedition


    Here are the Lowa Civettas I have.Lowa Civetta

    Lowa Civetta


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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    These are the ones I am considering for my next set of high country boots. I would like something a bit stiffer than my current Kennetrek Mountain boots.
    These are the Liskamm model leather/goretex. I would be interested in hearing more about those Merrel expedition boots though Snyd


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    Ya I need to go try some on. Might be my Brooks Range walkin sheep hunting boots this year. They have them here at Beaver Sports. I looked at them one day. They're pretty impressive, the plastic stabilizer for lateral ankle support and the soft sticky sole is what caught my attention. And only $250 retail . I had some Merrels a few years back and the Merrel last fits my foot shape. Unlike the LaSportivas, too narrow for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    These are the ones I am considering for my next set of high country boots. I would like something a bit stiffer than my current Kennetrek Mountain boots.
    These are the Liskamm model leather/goretex. I would be interested in hearing more about those Merrel expedition boots though Snyd

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    Default Scarpa's.....

    Last year I bought a set of the Scarpa Liskamm's for a sheep hunt. I was very, very impressed with them. They were very comfortable on the flats while hiking in and gave me all the support I needed while side hilling. In 8 days I never once had any foot pain, hot spots or anything. I just can't say enough good things about them. My partner was wearing the Lowa's and he was very happy with them also. Good luck.

    Dave

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    Quote Originally Posted by standdup View Post
    Last year I bought a set of the Scarpa Liskamm's for a sheep hunt. I was very, very impressed with them. They were very comfortable on the flats while hiking in and gave me all the support I needed while side hilling. In 8 days I never once had any foot pain, hot spots or anything. I just can't say enough good things about them. My partner was wearing the Lowa's and he was very happy with them also. Good luck.

    Dave
    Dave
    sorry to corner you on this but I am very interested in these boots and I have a specific question about them.
    When you are sidehilling and go to set the instep of your lower foot into the face of the hill does the Liskamm allow your foot to roll so that the flat of the boot sole is flush with the hill side, or does it bite in and keep your ankle straight verticle underneath you?
    On my Kennetreks I found that my lower foot would roll and not bite in while the outside of my upper foot would hold fast on even the slightest of a ledge (less tha 1/3 of my boot sole would be touching the ground). I know the Liskamm's have a lot more torsional rigidity and I think they may be the best compromise between plastic and leather, just don't want to spend the money on another boot that doesn't perform quite like I would like it too.

    On a side note the Kennetreks are a quality well made boot and other than this one situation I am very pleased with them.

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    Default scarpa

    I've used the Scarpa Inverno (black plastic mountaineering) boot on numerous hunts. I settled on this boot same as Synd. The koflachs just did not fit my feet. I bought them at AMH. The Inverno is a great plastic boot. Plastics are tough flat lander boots. When walking flat land they tend to bruise your shin. I think they call it "shin bump". If you are not real careful to loosen the top portion of the boot an egg sized lump can form and be quite painful. Besides that I had nothing to say negative about them... until

    My brooks range hunt. We flew in and dropped off at the river. We then hiked 12 miles further into "sheep country". I was in the best shape of my life and had never had a knee problem. On the second day I developed a major knee issue. It never materialized into a full out injury but it severely hampered my abilities. I attribute this pain to the additional strain the plastics caused. I know this lacks any real scientific evidence but I've since changed boots and have never had that happen again.

    The next year I came up with the money and bought the Scarpa Liskamm GTX. I spent a month or better wearing them around town and on training hikes. I was very impressed.

    The Liskamm GTX has become my hunting boot. Unless I'm floating a river I go to this boot. I've worn them on two sheep hunts, a goat hunt, kodiak bear hunt and 3 "up and over the pass" moose hunts. When they wear out I'll by another pair.

    Their rigidity is as close to a plastic boot minus the "shin bump" plastics cause. I can wear these on flat ground, near vertical or scree with ease. Ya, as you can tell I like them that much...

    I still own the Inverno's and don't believe I'll ever wear them again. But it's so hard to part with gear when you think to your self - Well I'd rather have them and not need them than need them and not have them....anyway - Hope this helps...

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Dave
    When you are sidehilling and go to set the instep of your lower foot into the face of the hill does the Liskamm allow your foot to roll so that the flat of the boot sole is flush with the hill side, or does it bite in and keep your ankle straight verticle underneath you?
    Mine are very stiff and keep my ankle straight veticle underneath me. I can't say enough about how much I like mine. I had the Meindle before and didn't have any complaints, but after getting the Liskamm I know what I was missing out on. Sidehilling is where I really noticed the difference.
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    dang i think i'm sold on the liskumattics boots...however you spell it.
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  10. #10

    Default Packin

    Believe me there was some sidehilling with this load. That's the whole sheep (meat and horns) plus what was left of my two week camp after one week. My Scarpa Liskamm's held up great, and have lasted longer under more strenuous conditions than my Meindl's did also.

    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

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    sorry i musta missed it..wheres the sidehilling in that pic?? lol
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    Default Rolling wasn't an issue.

    We had lots of side-hilling on my hunt and my feet just didn't roll at all. The leather on those boots is amazingly stiff and, like Blackfeather said, takes a long time to break in. I hiked in mine 4 - 5 times a week for about 3 months which seemed to work well. I also put as much NikWax on them as they would take and my feet stayed really dry. The only thing I upgraded was the insoles, which I would recommend.

    I'm sure the plastics will provide better support in the really steep stuff but I was totally happy with the Scarpa's. They are a great boot. Expensive, but worth it.

    Have fun.....

    Dave

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    I have to look at a boot's heel before I'll even try them on. If I have to walk on a hard surface and the heel is square at the back I guarantee my knees will hurt. A little rocker in the heel is a requirement. In my case, Lowa boots not only fit like a glove but the heel profile doesn't hurt me. The Scarpas are too square for me. I suppose I could take a belt sander to a new pair of $400 boots, but why bother, as long as I can find what I need.

    Plastic boots are noisy. I know they have specific advantages, but they're noisy just the same.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    ...Plastic boots are noisy. I know they have specific advantages, but they're noisy just the same.
    Oh ya, I forgot to add that. My Lowas do squeak.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snyd View Post
    Oh ya, I forgot to add that. My Lowas do squeak.
    i have worn my lowa's "sheephunter" from schnee's boots in boseman, mt and they are great mountain boots. the support is similar to a plastic boot, but more comfortable. no sore shins, or squeeks.

    the boots are waterproof, and have crossed streams to prove it, further they are comfortable in a wide range of temps and conditions. as a first rate hunting boot for the mountains they get my vote.

    happy trails.
    j
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    Default Koflach

    I have had some knee pain with mine only after several miles of flat land hiking. So how much should I take off the heel to keep my knees healthy? Looking at them on line and only see slight differences.

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    do the liskamms hold up well in the rocks, as far as getting cut up and stuff. i know the plastics you can write on with a dremmel tool but was curious on the liskamms?
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    I own a pair of the Merrell Expedition's that Snyd posted above, this is my mini write up on them. I bought them for ice climbing, glacier travel, and mountaineering. Out of the box they are built well with high quality stitching and good wrap around rubber in all the places i want it to wrap around. The construction and ergonomics overall are very good, the insole is crap and I replaced it immediately.

    I waxed them and wore them around the house for a little while and they were very comfortable, then took them hiking and ice climbing. One thing I was very impressed about was that there was almost no break-in required. They were immediately comfortable and stayed that way, I hiked a 4-5 mile round trip hike with ~2000 feet of vert and didn't have any hot spots. One nice thing is that they have a plastig shank so they don't sap the heat our of your feet as much as a boot with a steel shank does when hiking on snow.

    Being that they are primarily my ice climbing boots they dominate steep terain, I have lead 5.6-5.7 rock with them and they were awesome. They do quite well on ice, not as good a stiff plastics but very good for leathers. They are great on steep terrain, but are only ok on flat ground. When I am hiking on flats for a prolonged distance I only tighten them to the ankle to allow my shin to move freely which helps considerably.

    One drawback is weight, these boots are not light by any means. I have since switched to these for my mountaineering boots:

    http://www.ems.com/1/1/14954-asolo-m...ing-boots.html

    but would not hesitate to recommend the Merrell's assuming they fit your feet well and you take into consideration their weight.

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    asrjb25: hmmm.. I guess I have to spread rep around before patting you on the back again so I willl do it here, thanks for the great post on the merrells!

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    Thumbs up scarpa

    My 2 cents worth is I have used these boots on 3 sheep hunts and they worked great, not one complant even under a #75 pack thats were they really shine

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