Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: What is Herco powder comparable too for loading purposes?

  1. #1
    Member tccak71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,874

    Default What is Herco powder comparable too for loading purposes?

    My buddy insists that I can load 44 Rem Mag with this powder, but I can't find any load data using Herco. I'm trying to load Nosler Sport Handgun 240 gr. jhp. Does anyone know of a recipe using this powder? The plastic container says its made by Alliant and I did try their web site, but to know avail. Any idea where this powder ranks burn rate wise?

    On another note, I am assuming that when my 44 mag booklet (spiral bound) recommends Unique, that its the same powder some are using to reload shotgun shells, is this correct? The Herco I have is a shotgun reload powder too.

    Any help?

    Tim

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    2,353

    Default

    Herco is a little slower than unique and should make a good mid power 44mag load. It's not very popular for pistol and I don't know why but it should work if you can find data for it.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    2,353

    Default

    And, yes unique the shotgun powder is the same as unique for pistol.

  4. #4

    Default

    You can load the 44 mag with a lot of powders including 231. The question is will you get maximum velocities out of the powder. Herco will not even come close to doing this in the 44 mag. Think H110/296, N110, 2400 as the right choices.

    However, if all your trying to do is load some practice stuff and max performance is not an issue than it will work. A lot of mid range loads have been loaded with Unique in the 44 mag over the years. If you have it use it but I wouldn't go out looking to buy it as a 44 mag powder.

    See this link for some Herco 44 mag loads.

    http://www.sixguns.com/tests/tt44mag.htm

  5. #5
    Member tccak71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,874

    Default

    Yea, that's the deal; new to reloading and have it (Herco, Unique, Green Dot & Red Dot). Can't find H110 or other powders out there.

    Tim

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    137

    Default

    Tim, you might check Mountain View Sports on Old Seward, or Great Northern Guns on Tudor. The price will be a little higher, but at least they have something resembling a selection.

    My favorite heavy load powder is Winchester 296, but in addition to those mentioned by Jack, other powders that work well for the hotter loads are Accurate #9 and Hodgdon Lil' Gun.


    Mike

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,245

    Default

    Herco will work for mid power .44mag loads. i have shot a bunch of it. My powder of choice for .44mag is blue dot or 2400. For plinkin ammo Herco is just fine.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kgpcr View Post
    Herco will work for mid power .44mag loads. i have shot a bunch of it. My powder of choice for .44mag is blue dot or 2400. For plinkin ammo Herco is just fine.
    What is your recipe for 2400? Have you tried heavy bullets, 300 gr?

    I am going to develop a practice (240 gr. lead bullets) and a bear defense loads (300 gr. hard cast bullets) for my 629 Mountain S&W. It is 4" model with pretty "thin" barrel. Since it is short, I thought a bit more faster (than, say, H110) 2400 will work better. Any experience or advice?

    Thanks,
    SERGEIMA

  9. #9
    Member tccak71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,874

    Default

    Looks like I can load 240g lswc with Herco & others. I've got access to some of those to get me started, but I also have 240g jhp w/out info.

    Tim

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sergeima View Post
    What is your recipe for 2400? Have you tried heavy bullets, 300 gr?

    I am going to develop a practice (240 gr. lead bullets) and a bear defense loads (300 gr. hard cast bullets) for my 629 Mountain S&W. It is 4" model with pretty "thin" barrel. Since it is short, I thought a bit more faster (than, say, H110) 2400 will work better. Any experience or advice?

    Thanks,
    SERGEIMA
    I load 21.5 grains H110 behind a Cast Precision 300 grain hard cast bullet. Chrono at 1290 fps out of a 4" S&W mountain gun.

    Obviously start low and work it in your gun.

    The short barrel fast powder theory never pans out in my experience because reaching the pressure max using faster powders always limits you to a slower net speed even in a short barrel.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    137

    Default

    Jack is 100% correct. I also recommend his 300 grain cast bullet load. I use the same powder charge under various 300 grain cast bullets with good success.

    Mike

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack49 View Post
    I load 21.5 grains H110 behind a Cast Precision 300 grain hard cast bullet. Chrono at 1290 fps out of a 4" S&W mountain gun.

    Obviously start low and work it in your gun.

    The short barrel fast powder theory never pans out in my experience because reaching the pressure max using faster powders always limits you to a slower net speed even in a short barrel.
    Wow, this is some serious 1100 lbs ft energy. Thank you for recipe. And for reassurance that "mountain" 629 can hold substantial charges.

    How do you check for pressure signs specifically with revolvers?
    I know the drill with the rifles (flat primer bottom with some kind of crater from firing pin, appearance of some "shining" at bottom of the case, complicated extraction). What I should look at in case of revolvers working my way up with the loads?

    SERGEIMA

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sergeima View Post
    Wow, this is some serious 1100 lbs ft energy. Thank you for recipe. And for reassurance that "mountain" 629 can hold substantial charges.

    How do you check for pressure signs specifically with revolvers?
    I know the drill with the rifles (flat primer bottom with some kind of crater from firing pin, appearance of some "shining" at bottom of the case, complicated extraction). What I should look at in case of revolvers working my way up with the loads?

    SERGEIMA
    It kicks pretty hard in the mountain gun but that's my bear load.

    I look for flat primers and most importantly sticky extraction. I find that the sticky extraction is the best clue.

    However, I also research the loads I'm trying to make sure they pass the sanity test. In this case 21.5 is not max from some sources. So I was pretty comfortable going there. However chronograph testing up to 22 grains didn't show any significant velocity improvement so I backed off to 21.5 and have been using it for years. I find you can substitute 296 here if you dont' have H110.

    Finally I always test stuff in the summer and not in the dead of winter. You can get away with some crazy loads on a winter day in Fairbanks that you can't at 80 degrees. I always use the chronograph these days. If I'm getting speed out of whack with what others have reported it causes concern.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •