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Thread: Pillar Glass bedding

  1. #1
    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Default Pillar Glass bedding

    Is this something a nooby can do without screwing up a 500 dollar stock? I get the whole idea but can anybody do it?

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    I would say just about anyone who can bed a stock can do it. Bore out where the bedding screws go and fill with epoxy resin in a way to anchor it to the stock. The concept here to provide a solid non-squishable post on which to cinch down the bedding screws. Normally this would be done to a wood stock that is getting soft at the bedding points. There is no magic in it and I would consider it less effective than conventional bedding from every perspective. Any stock can be bedded and I know a guy who is very good at this. Generally cost about $150 or so depending on the rifle and stock, I'd say. He has glass bedded several for me and within the past month he has done two or three of them.

    Why is it you are considering pillar bedding? What advantages do you consider form this approach vs convetional action bedding/barrel floating or full bedding?
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  3. #3

    Default Pillar Bedding Experience

    I just finished pillar bedding a laminated wood stock for a Remington 700 Magnum. It took me quite a few hours, but I think it will shake out pretty good. I made the pillars from a pair of cylindrical aluminum spacers that were spare parts from a motorcycle. It was quite tedious to get the round (concave) end on the tops of the pillars, to match the round shape of the bottom of the Remington action. Then I adjusted their lengths until the magazine was close to a perfect fit between the action and the bottom metal, out of the stock. I ground gluing grooves into the outside surfaces of the pillars, and glued them in using Brownell's Acraglas bedding compound. It is not an easy task for a beginner like me, but if your are careful and meticulous, you can get it done. Boring out the holes for the pillars is another process that would probably be much more precise and more easily done if you had the proper boring tool, with the pilot to guide it through the existing bolt holes. I managed to get it done with just a large drill bit, and it doesn't have to be absolutely precise.

    Anyway, after I got the pillars glued in place, the following day I glass bedded the action, the recoil lug, and the first two inches of the barrel. That was also not a real easy job, and can be pretty messy. You have to be absolutely certain that the release agent is applied to any metal that may have contact with the bedding compound, or you will glue it permanently into the stock. The rest of the barrel is free floated.

    Now I am in the process of putting the finish on the stock.

    What I would suggest is doing some reading by Googling "pillar bedding". I personally would hesitate to try my first one on a $500 stock. I bought a used laminated stock for my project. It has seen lots of use, and it was cracked, and had been wet numerous times. If I ruined it, I figured I wasn't going to be completely distraught.

    I think it is going to be pretty good, and it is beginning to look o.k. Now, if it just shoots good, I'll be pretty happy! It's a .375 H&H stainless that came with a plastic stock.

    Jim

  4. #4

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    I just installed pillar and bedded my remington 700. It took longer than I expected but you can do it pretty easily IF you take your time. I used shoe polish as my release agent and it worked extremely well but I never used anything else so others may be fine too. I used Holland's pillars but if I were to do it again I'd get the adjustable pillars. I don't have machining tools and cutting regular pillars precisely is a pain. I used Devcon Liquid steel putty and it seems to work well, leaving a very professional finish. Here are a few tips that could be overlooked... make sure you coat the lug area inside, i used a tooth brush and really coated it good. Thank god I did because a lot of the epoxy oozed up into there and I would have been in trouble. Also before you do anything I'd put masking tape around the whole stock, helps keep it clean and you'll be surprised how much mess that epoxy makes. Buy a bunch of qtips for cleaning the oozing epoxy out. Make sure you coat the inside of the pillars and the screw with release agent when glass bedding. If you don't have one, get a dremel with a stone, makes cleanup much easier.

  5. #5
    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Smile weell i just dont know anything about it

    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    I would say just about anyone who can bed a stock can do it. Bore out where the bedding screws go and fill with epoxy resin in a way to anchor it to the stock. The concept here to provide a solid non-squishable post on which to cinch down the bedding screws. Normally this would be done to a wood stock that is getting soft at the bedding points. There is no magic in it and I would consider it less effective than conventional bedding from every perspective. Any stock can be bedded and I know a guy who is very good at this. Generally cost about $150 or so depending on the rifle and stock, I'd say. He has glass bedded several for me and within the past month he has done two or three of them.

    Why is it you are considering pillar bedding? What advantages do you consider form this approach vs convetional action bedding/barrel floating or full bedding?

    Its just a new concept to me. Im a handy feller and can usually figure stuff Out. My whole question is the mcmillian stock ready to go or does it have to customized IE. the bedding. by a smith for my application to 375 ruger. Thier web site is kinda confusing on this. thanks for any enlightenment. If I needed practice I could try it on my laminated stock for my 300 that I still got kicking around. And see how that goes. But it seems as one time deal might be better just have a pro do it.

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    The nice thing about bedding is that you are adding to the stock. The big fear is glueing the action into the stock. So provided you do not glue it in, if it does not come out well you can always remove all or most of the bedding and try again only losing the cost of the epoxy. I would say anyone can do it but you need to be cearful.

    So far I have only bedded 3 rifles, a Interarms Mark X (commercial Mauser 98) and a Romanian 22. Both turned out okay. I used Brownells Acra Glass for both. Acra Glass is nice and cheap and easy to find, it flows nicely into tite spaces like stock cracks or around pillars. The down side is it flows like searup and you need to completely block all paths it can flow out the bottom of the stock. For full bedding a stock I would recommend something thicker and though I have not personally tryed it, "Devcon Liquid steel putty" that has been already mentioned, seems like a good choice. On the 22 there were no pillers just bedding. On the Interarms I drilled out and bedded pillers. I then drilled out the inside of the pillers a little over the screw size, so they would not take any recoil and split the stock. One warning if you drill the pillers is to go real slow. The Acra Glass seems to sofen with heat produced by the drill bit and the pillars twisted out and I had to drill the stock and do them again. But you have all the do overs in the world provided you have enough

    On the Romanian 22 I used the release agent that came with the Acra Glass. On the Interarms I used Kiwi Show wax. The show wax is a little more difficult to apply but leaves a way thiner coating that does not come off as easy, and I will use it in the future in all my bedding. The Acra Glass comes with good instructions and most of them applie to any bedding material.

    The biggest thing with bedding is preperation. In many ways my first bedding job was way better then my second. On the first one I was nervous as hell and double and tripple checked everything. On the second I was more confident and jumped the gun of several things.

    As I said I have only bedded two rifles and they were both cheap. The 22 was less then $100, and the Interarms was $300 something so I did not have much to lose. I figured if I had to chip off the 22 stock I could make a new one out of about any chunk of wood. And a new stock for the Interarms would be about $100, so I figured it was worth the risk. Worst case senario and I learned something for $100. I would do this on my own rifle with a $500 stock with the experiance I have now but it would be much harder to do so for the first time.

    There are many bedding theorys and who knows what is best. For myself I think A full bedding of the receaver togeather with pillers is the best. However, I have not tryed other methods. There are also verious theorys about holding the action in the stock while the bedding hardens. Personally I think it is best to just snug up the action screws, but again I have not tryed other things.

    Here are some links that may be of use.
    http://riflestocks.tripod.com/bedding.html
    http://www272.pair.com/stevewag/turk/turkmain.html
    http://www.larrywillis.com/tip021.html
    http://www.gunsandhunting.com/Midway_May1.html
    http://www.charm.net/~kmarsh/bed.html
    http://www.varminthunters.com/tech/bedding.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by Magnum Man View Post
    Its just a new concept to me. Im a handy feller and can usually figure stuff Out. My whole question is the mcmillian stock ready to go or does it have to customized IE. the bedding. by a smith for my application to 375 ruger. Thier web site is kinda confusing on this. thanks for any enlightenment. If I needed practice I could try it on my laminated stock for my 300 that I still got kicking around. And see how that goes. But it seems as one time deal might be better just have a pro do it.

    I guess I didn't inderstand you were going to do it your self. I've done some bedding and plan to do more of it when I can but I wouldn't start out with an expensive McMillan stock.

    I don't quite understand what is gained by the pillars over a good action bedding.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  8. #8

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    The pillars give you a consistent tension on the action the action screws because they cant compress like wood does. Not sure if it makes much of a "real world difference" but they aren't that bad to install and I doubt they can hurt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeStaten View Post
    The pillars give you a consistent tension on the action the action screws because they cant compress like wood does. Not sure if it makes much of a "real world difference" but they aren't that bad to install and I doubt they can hurt.
    mike: good reply.......and i agree with you. personally, unless the stock is a laminate or synthetic, the pillars would not be the best situation. the idea is to return the rifle to 0 when reassembling action to stock. i torque mine to 65 inch pounds.

    with a standard wood stock(prone to warpage) barrel channel vageries and other stock pressures would pretty much undue the value of the pillars BUT on the synthetic or laminate stock....GREAT IDEA!!

    happy trails.
    jh

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeStaten View Post
    The pillars give you a consistent tension on the action the action screws because they cant compress like wood does. Not sure if it makes much of a "real world difference" but they aren't that bad to install and I doubt they can hurt.

    Ok, but isn't that what conventional bedding is to make a solid base for the action at the correct points of contact? Is there an advantage of this over full action bedding. After bedding a hard contact surface for the bottom metal and the inside for the action fore and aft isn't this solid enough? I suppose if there is any wood in between these tow layers of hard epoxy that could squish together, but if the wood is sound wouldn't that take a lot of torque?

    I can see doing it if the wood has softened over time and constant hammering with recoil but for a good walnut stock in good condition do we gain anything by the pillar bed?.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  12. #12

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    To be perfectly honest, I'm not sure how much a difference it makes. However, I do know that when I drop my action into the stock with the bedding and pillars there is absolutely no movement at all when I tighten the screws. Indication no compression. One more thing, when you are glass bedding, it's nice to have the rock solid pillars there to have the action to sit on. I look at it like synthetic oil vs. conventional... you aren't necessarily going to notice a real world difference with synthetic oil but it probably can't hurt.

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