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Thread: Split board snowboards??

  1. #1

    Default Split board snowboards??

    I posted this in another thread, but since deleted it as to not further hijack gogoalie's thread.

    I'm just looking into this option and like it a lot so far from what I read. However, I'm still a total newb at this so bear with me. Can ya posts some links of where to buy these boards, boots, and bindings?? Also I'm not sure how different it is for these split boards, but at 5'9 and 160 lbs I currently ride a 157 cm board. A 173 cm seems HUGE, do you need to get a board considerably longer than what you normally ride to make the skiing aspect of the split board better? How long does it take to go from a split board skiing setup to putting it together, adjusting the bindings for riding, and heading down the hill? Thanks for any info.

  2. #2
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    I'm no expert on split boards, but I know they set up quickly at the top of the hill (a few minutes at most). Sorry I can't help with the rest.

  3. #3

    Default Once place to buy

    REI has two different models in stock. Looked at them last week, range about $900-$1,000 for the board. I don't know anything about the boots. The boards seemed well constructed and very solid when locked together as a snowboard.

    As you walk into REI they are just to right before across from the luggage.

    Steve

  4. #4
    Member akfaller's Avatar
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    if you are going backcountry, splitboards are the only way to go. you expend way less energy and time. if your using snowshoes its not even close to the performance of skinning to the top.

    it's a lot of money to buy a new splitboard, so, making one is the cheaper way to go and from talking to people who have used both its not really worth the extra cost of buying new. voile has the do-it-yourself kit for $150 and skins are also $150. buy a used board or if you have an old one cut it in half and apply the given hardwear. as far as size, whatever works for you. longer boards are always better in powder, due to more flotation but its entirely up to you. your bindings from your present setup will work with the kit and same with your boots.

    check out voileusa.com and also splitboard.com

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    Alaska_Lanche,

    I'm pasting my reply from the other thread below, with a little more to add at the end....

    I ride a Voile 173cm splitboard. I totally love it! My setup has the Mountain Plate bindings, which I HIGHLY recommend over regular strap bindings. The Mountain Plate bindings require a boot with a toe and heel bail system, so regular snowboarding boots won't work....but if you're like me and have over a dozen different pairs of boots, you probably have something that would work. I can use my double plastic mountaineering boots (Scarpa Inverno), but prefer to use my Scarpa Laser ski-touring boots. The control and quick response I get with the ski boot/mountain plate binding combo is unbelievable, and the bindings even have climbing bars for when the terrain gets steeper. Plus, in my opinion the Mountain Plate bindings are way safer than strap bindings in an avalanche scenario (god forbid of course) because it is easy to very quickly release the bindings and free yourself from the board if you find yourself caught in a slide. With strap bindings you're stuck to the board for sure, which in certain situations could cause you to literally "sink" into the mass of sliding snow instead of "swim" on the surface.

    173 is a big board, but I haven't found it to be clunky or slow to turn (before getting this board I rode 165-168). Could be the Mountain Plate bindings at work. That board floats on ANYTHING. In my opinion, for most Alaska terrain and snow, a long board is what you want. I got mine on Craigslist for about 40% of retail.

    The Voile setup comes apart and goes together very quickly, especially once you get the routine dialed. I've never had a problem with snow gumming up the components.

    I've never tried a home-made splitty but I would guess that there's a disadvantage on the way up when you don't have that metal outer edge on your "skis."

    Ride on dude!

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    Member Matt S's Avatar
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    I have a split kit and it is awesome. I split an old avalanche 165cm and it has held up well. It goes together quickly and rides just fine. IMO it's a far better deal than buying a new setup.

  7. #7

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    Where do you buy these split board kits??

  8. #8
    Member akfaller's Avatar
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    http://www.voileusa.com/

    voile makes and sells the split-kits. they also have skins, crampons, mountain plates, and instructions to make your own splitboard.

    what board are you thinking of splitting?

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by akfaller View Post
    http://www.voileusa.com/

    voile makes and sells the split-kits. they also have skins, crampons, mountain plates, and instructions to make your own splitboard.

    what board are you thinking of splitting?
    Not sure, want to keep my current one in one piece.

    Gonna start surfing craigslist for this project. Any suggestions on what size, brand, style of board I should be looking for??

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    Member akfaller's Avatar
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    For size, I would get at least a 160, but around 170 would be more ideal.

    Any board with a wood core is recommended, stiffer the better, try to get a freeride board if you have the option, but any board that is 160 or larger usually is more of a freeride board.

    As far as brand goes, I don't think it matters, I know Burton has the three hole system, which puts a hole directly in the center of the board, right where you'd want to cut. I'm not sure if it'd matter but it seems like it would.

    Alright, all this talk of splitboarding, I must get out of the house now. South Fork here I come!

  11. #11
    Member B-radford's Avatar
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    AK Lanche:

    I am 6'0" and 185 lbs, anything over a 160 is too big for me so a 170 would be enoumus for you. I have been snowboarding in the Alaska backcountry for 15+ years and i have never been in a situation where i wanted a split board, Snow shoes and colapsoable poles have always worked for me, and i have mabe many trips breaking trial in deep snow with just that. I disagree with the stiffer is better comment, i think that a little softer is better, stiff boards tend to sink in the pow. Also with the way snowboards them selfs are changing, you can ride deep pow with someting as 156.

    Or scratch the whole idea all together and get a sled.

  12. #12

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    Haha thanks, yeah I'm thinking the ol toboggan is the way to go. Yeah I currently ride a 156 acutally and really like it, but I think this might be a fun project to try out. I've done the snowshoe trekking pole route for a while now and would just like to try and see what the split board thing is all about. Could be fun? What are you using for boots snowshoeing and then boarding. I've just been using my Lowa Sheephunters for now as they offer some support, but not like my board boots.

  13. #13
    Member B-radford's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    Haha thanks, yeah I'm thinking the ol toboggan is the way to go. Yeah I currently ride a 156 acutally and really like it, but I think this might be a fun project to try out. I've done the snowshoe trekking pole route for a while now and would just like to try and see what the split board thing is all about. Could be fun? What are you using for boots snowshoeing and then boarding. I've just been using my Lowa Sheephunters for now as they offer some support, but not like my board boots.

    The sheep hunting/goat hunting boots stay at home. I just wear my snowboarding boots and leave them a litlle losser than what i like them at when i ride. I like the extra ankle support when i am walking up hill, plus they keep my feet way warm. Go for it, i have never tried splitboarding, everyone tells me that they are crazy stiff boards and i prefer someting softer.

  14. #14
    Member akfaller's Avatar
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    I don't know B-rad? I think we're going to have to agree to disagree...we're the same height and weight and 156 is too small for me, well, I wouldn't say too small but not my preference, especially when the snow gets deep. I'd rather float on top of the snow rather than having to lean way back to keep the smaller board on top.

    As far as stiffness goes, well, you get quicker response in a stiffer board rather than a delayed response in softer board. And I don't know why a stiffer board would sink? If anything, it would have more float because you can lean it back without it flexing and stay on top of the snow.

    But to each his own. Keep on riding splitboard or not, short or long, stiff or soft. Alright, quit giggling.

  15. #15
    Member B-radford's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akfaller View Post
    I don't know B-rad? I think we're going to have to agree to disagree...we're the same height and weight and 156 is too small for me, well, I wouldn't say too small but not my preference, especially when the snow gets deep. I'd rather float on top of the snow rather than having to lean way back to keep the smaller board on top.

    As far as stiffness goes, well, you get quicker response in a stiffer board rather than a delayed response in softer board. And I don't know why a stiffer board would sink? If anything, it would have more float because you can lean it back without it flexing and stay on top of the snow.

    But to each his own. Keep on riding splitboard or not, short or long, stiff or soft. Alright, quit giggling.
    Ever hear of Banana-traction or reverse cambered boards, or the burton fish? no need for super long boards in the backcountry. Your right, to each his own, I actually find its next to impossiable to sugest what kind of set up people should use. I ride with guys who attack turnagain with 154s and they rip it up. I prefer a softer board because its easier to get the nose up when you are doing stuff like droping cliffs or hitting big pow jumps. Maybe its just me but i think that you get less of a response from something that is too stiff.

  16. #16
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Default Burton Split board on Craigslist

    162cm I believe. $700, was recently posted today in the sporting goods. Hardly used and comes with everything. I would check it out but too short! I would be interested in a 180+cm, not sure if I would use it thought! Sure sounds cool.

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    Size is definately personal preference. I am 5'8" and ride a 174 and love it. At one point I was riding a 182. I have guided on these for 7 winters now.
    As far as buying one goes, this is definately the year to get one if you are even remotely serious. Retailers have not been able to sell them as they have in the past due to the economy.
    Here is a web site that regularly has new and used boards for sale:
    www.splitboard.com
    Also keep your eyes on craigs list.
    Don't bother with the splitkit. It costs over $100.00 and eventually you will want to upgrade to the real deal which is $100 you could have spend towards a pre-made one.
    pm me if you are interested in a 182.

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